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Category: Stupid Foreigner Tricks (page 1 of 38)

The perils of intercultural communication… in the KBO

As I said on my Facebook page, I don’t blame the ump at all for this. It’s one thing to get yelled at by a foreigner in a foreign language. It’s another to get yelled at by a foreigner in a foreign language for a pitch that’s clearly high and inside.

Charlie Shirek isn’t the only one experiencing communication issues in the KBO. Former MLBer Luke Scott was cut from his team last month for yelling at his manager. Well, for yelling at his manager and, one suspects, for putting up disappointing numbers. As Deadspin notes, though, Scott’s case might not be about cultural or linguistic misunderstandings at all:

The report’s “insiders” chalk things up to cultural differences, though no one’s actually on record as saying that. But why would there be any cultural confusion here? Luke Scott speaks fluent dick, and dick is a universal language.

Of course, Scott is a special sort of guy.

Quincy Black to face justice

Seoul Central District Court has indicted—and detained—a 29-year-old American on charges of producing a video of him having sex with an underage girl.

And yes, it’s Quincy Black.

He’s accused of taking a teenage girl he met on Korean Cupid back to his room, plying her with booze and filming them having sex with four pre-positioned cameras.

According to BreakNews, Mr. “Black” spent 20 hours a week teaching English to elementary kids and the rest of his time looking for girls. He edited and uploaded on to an overseas porn site the video he took of having sex with some of the girls. The videos then made their way back to Korea, and you know the rest.

I do find it interesting that the media took interest in this case but nobody’s mentioned this case yet.

Canadian accused of sex with minor in Cambodia may have molested minors in Korea, too: report

Remember how we mentioned a long-time expat here recently got busted in Cambodia for allegedly paying a 14-year-old boy for sex?

Well, according to John Power in Groove, this story might be worse. Much worse:

A former native English teacher in Korea currently facing charges of paying a 14-year-old boy for sex in Cambodia was previously arrested in Seoul on suspicion of fondling a boy and had a history of sexual activity with minors, according to former friends and a recorded conversation.

If the allegations made in the report are true, it would mean a lot of folk really dropped the ball here, including the cops (“I overheard cops laughing about who was going to have to talk with the foreigner”) and possibly the foreign community of Haebangchon:

Savoy added that the allegations against V**** were widely known among foreigners in Haebangchon.

“People talked indignantly but did nothing. I’m excluding a few people from this, including myself as well as anyone else who actually reacted towards a solution, but the general response seemed to be that the shock was public property while justice was an unrelated taboo,” he said in an email.

Why would justice be such a “taboo” in this case?

English teacher who made porn video extradited to Korea… might it be Quincy Black?

The Korea Herald is reporting that a 29-year-old American former teacher at an English village in Daejeon has been extradited from—of all places—Armenia to Korea where he is accused of having made a porn film with a teenage girl:

A 29-year-old American accused of having sex with a teenage girl and posting a video of it online was extradited from Armenia to South Korea on Wednesday, the Ministry of Justice said.

The ministry has been tracking down the suspect’s whereabouts since 2010, when he fled to China as the video stirred a firestorm of criticism in the Korean online community.

“The urgency of each case decides how fast the extradition will take place. In this case, it only took three months, whereas it could take up to three years for other cases,” a prosecutor in charge of the case told The Korea Herald.

Let’s see. Age? Check. Place of employment? Check. Public firestorm? Check. Might we be welcoming back Quincy Black?

(HT to Aaron)

UPDATE: Yep, it’s Quincy Black (thanks, TV Chosun!):

And to think people worried about letting the big newspapers have TV stations.

Anyway, according to the article, one of the girls in the video was 15 years old at the time. Which, if true, would explain why the authorities wanted him back.

As the Chosun reports:

Despite committing a sex crime against children, a serious offense, he shot a video of it with a picture openly on the wall with his name written in Korean. (Note to Chosun: I don’t think that’s his real name).

The Chosun also reports:

The video also caused a stir: as it got around, many foreigners posted comments or SNS messages disparaging Korean women, such as “Korean women are easy to meet (i.e., sleep with).”

I can assure you foreigners weren’t the only ones “disparaging Korean women” online as a result of that video.

Interestingly enough, this was the first extradition to Korea since Seoul joined the Council of Europe’s Convention on Extradition in 2011. So mansae, Korean diplomacy!

What I want to know is what the hell Quincy Black was doing in Armenia. I realize the Russians call people from that part of the world “blackasses,” but still, Armenia doesn’t strike me as a place where a guy like him is going to blend in.

Foreigners busted for drugs, complain of loneliness and stress in Korea

- Prosecutors in lovely Daegu have booked and detained six folk, including a Brit teaching at a local middle school and a Yank hagwon teacher, on charges of smuggling/using “new drugs,” in this case Spice and DMT.

Some 12 other folks, including a USFK dependent and a Canadian hagwon teacher, were booked without detention on the same charges.

Police accuse the motley crew of smuggling the drugs from China and the Netherlands using—sit down for this—international mail and either taking it themselves or selling it to other foreigners.

By nationality, nine were Americans, followed by four Koreans, two Canadians and one Brit, Australians and Kiwi. Personally, I blame the state of Colorado.

The accused reportedly told investigators during questioning that the started taking drugs to “alleviate the loneliness and stress of life in Korea.”

Oh, and speaking of foreign crime, Statistics Korea’s latest report on social trends show that the gap between foreigner and domestic crime rates are closing—the Korean rate of criminality is just 1.8 times that of foreigners. And to make matters worse, foreign criminals tend to be more violent—murder accounted for 0.59% of crimes committed by foreigners in 2010, five times the Korean rate. The rate for mugging was four times higher.

The return of Korean turtles and birds from the past

Lately a number of historical significant items have been returned to Korea – items that were alleged to have been stolen by U.S. soldiers.  It should be noted that in some cases these items were bought from Koreans – although the buyer should have been a little suspicious such as Sergeant Giltner who was approached by a Korean selling antiques from his cart:

One item, a huge carpet – nearly eighteen and a half feet long and about eight feet wide – made from the matched pelts of 48 leopards immediately caught Giltner’s attention. Although he didn’t explain how he had come by the carpet, the Korean peddler claimed “it was worth at least $25,000 and came from the Chang Duk palace in Seoul.” He was willing to sell it for a mere 150,000 Korean won – worth about $25 USD. Giltner promptly bought it and in a letter to his parents wrote that he was sending them “a pretty nice Korean rug” that he had picked up.

After the carpet was sent home, a Korean diplomat recognized the carpet as having come from Queen Min’s bedroom.  It was returned to the Korean government but now it has been speculated that the carpet was not the queen’s.

Los Angeles County Museum of Arts may be forced to return a Joseon era seal:

In a September statement, the museum said there was “credible evidence” that its Royal Seal with Knob in the Form of a Turtle was “removed unlawfully from the National Shrine in Korea.”

“While LACMA has not received a formal request from the Korean national government, we have reached out to them to discuss the results of our research and a mutually satisfactory resolution, including the return of the Royal Seal to Korea,” the statement said.

An official at the state-run cultural heritage administration told The Associated Press that South Korea in May asked the United States to investigate how the seal ended up at the Los Angeles museum known for showcasing art from ancient times to the modern era.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity citing department rules, said U.S. homeland security officials have confiscated the seal, as they investigate.

But not every item coming back to Korea is coming back by legal force.  A large number of Joseon era wooden birds are being given to a univeristy in Korea by a Japanese collector in the hopes of generating goodwill:

Haruo Yahashi, 79, owner of a surveying firm, has collected 140 such artworks, many of which were made in the 19th century and were used as gifts, ever since he fell in love with an elegantly sculpted bird he saw at an antique store in Tokyo some 30 years ago.

He will donate them to Daegu Health College in the city of Daegu in southeastern South Korea.

Many of the sculptures are 20 cm to 40 cm long and weigh between 3 and 5 kg. Some are painted in bright colors such as red and yellow, while others are covered with gold foil, a sign that they were originally owned by wealthy Koreans.

Mr. Haruo Yahashi explained his reasons for giving the gifts as,  “Japan-South Korea relations are facing difficulties now, but I hope my donation will help promote exchanges on a grass-roots level.”

Foreigners Gone Wild 2013

It’s the summer beach season, which means it’s time for this year’s instalment of Foreigners Gone Wild.

KBS got the ball rolling when an investigative journalism program ran a segment on the dangers of Korea’s summer vacation locales—no, I didn’t see it, but judging from the write-ups, the segment included drunk, rowdy (and naked!) foreigners at a certain regional mud festival (can’t think of which one) and pervs—foreign and domestic—secretly snapping photos of women at the beach. The foreign ones are apparently especially problematic because they deny everything and investigators can’t communicate with them.

Like I said, I didn’t see the program. I did read the Korea Times piece on the hidden—or not so hidden, as it were—camera issue on the beach, as did many of you, judging from my comment section. I particular enjoyed this line:

One police official stated, “Korean men usually don’t do anything that arouse suspicion, but foreign men have a tendency to satisfy their curiosity and take pictures. If you want to take pictures of a girl, ask her for her admission and even if you get the shot, posting it online is illegal.”

I’m reminded of the line in the film “Barcelona” about how shootings in America don’t mean we’re more violent than other people, it just means “we’re better shots” (HT to Mark).” What I think the cop really meant to say is that while Koreans get busted a plenty snapping unauthorised photos of the ladies, they’re less likely to simply pull out their camera and start snapping away in front of a beach full of witnesses.

It is interesting to note, though, that according to one report, 16 out of the 18 folk arrested for molesting bathers at Haeundae Beach (including hidden cameras) in 2012 were foreigner labourers. On a positive note, only one was Mongolian. Yay, Mongolia.

The Munhwa Ilbo ran a story on the “foreigners at the beach snapping photos of women in bikinis” crisis yesterday, which I note mostly because of the absolutely awesome illustration that accompanied it:

2013072901071127150002_b

The Munhwa Ilbo notes that the number of foreigners busted for taking photos of women has increased six-fold over four years, from just seven in 2008 to 43 last year. As of the the end of June, 25 foreigners had been busted, and the summer vacation period hadn’t even started. The Munhwa Ilbo also expressed concern about secondary damage caused when foreigners bring their photos back home and spread them, presumably online, and presumably opposed to, say, posting photos on domestic websites along with comments about humping white chicks (note: I have no idea if those shots were taken secretly or not).

More on Foreign Douchebag Video-Gate

The Korea Herald’s John Power has been in contact with a third person who claims to have been involved in “staging” the video of a bunch of foreigners abusing a Korean woman:

A Korean film studies graduate told The Korea Herald on Wednesday, however, that he was one of the makers of the video and that it was “totally fictional.” On Tuesday, two other men, who identified themselves as the Western men in the clip, had separately claimed that the video had been edited and was part of a series of short films shot in January 2011.
[...]
While the Korean, who has participated in film competitions here, declined to confirm to The Korea Herald that he was the director, he said that he had played a major part in making the film. He said he and the rest of the crew, whom he did not wish to identify, had intended for the film to be seen as “a work of art.”

He also said that he was very concerned about the reaction of Internet users to the film and felt sorry for the foreign actors involved, stressing that the current video was very different from the intention of the original. He added that he was not in possession of the complete footage.

I don’t know. I suppose these guys could be who they say they are. The explanations are a bit odd, though, as is the fact that they waited until the story appeared on a WaPo blog to come forward. At any rate, the WaPo’s Max Fisher doesn’t seem convinced it’s a fake, either. I guess it would be nice if the woman in the video stepped forward to say what happened, and even nicer if we could get some actual names.

Foreign douchebag video goes viral… in los Estados Unidos

UPDATE 4: There goes the neighborhood—it’s made the Daily Mail. What I want to know is why the Mail mentioned the Yank accent, but failed to mention the Irish one.

Who knew the Mail was so pro-Hibernian?

Honestly, the video has generated much more of a response in the foreign press than it did in the local press. Of course, that’s changing now—many papers might have passed on the video, but they won’t pass on a big American paper writing about the video.

UPDATE 3: Max Fisher tweets:

The Dong-A Ilbo piece on the WaPo post notes at the very end that a commenter claims the video was staged.

UPDATE 2: John Power at the Korea Herald has posted some of the results of his interactions with the folk who claim to have been “actors” in the video. The Sports Kyungyang picks up on the Korea Herald piece. Check out Gusts of Popular Feeling’s post, too.

UPDATE: In the comment section of Gusts of Popular Feeling, King Baeksu expresses a good deal skepticism regarding the authenticity of the video. He’s also not especially pleased with the decision to run the WaPo post when the video’s nature has yet to be verified. I highly recommend giving his comments a read.

Original Post: At the WaPo, Max Fisher does a pretty good job describing the Internet sensation that was the video of the foreigners harassing a Korean woman.

Jezebel subsequently picked it up.

Like I said, Fisher does an admirable job handling a subject that’s essentially one big minefield. I don’t know how much the video tells us about Korea’s glass ceiling, though—I’m sure you can make linkages, of course, but the problem of gender inequality in Korea probably deserves a fuller discussion. This part creeped me out a bit, too:

One Korea-based American to whom I sent the video explained why it can be especially tragic when Korean women are mistreated by Western men. Some Korean women, frustrated by their country’s restrictive gender culture, can see Western men as a gateway to a world where they’re treated more equally.

Not quite sure why the dashing of Joy Luck Club fantasies is “especially tragic.” Some might argue that it’s probably a good thing in the long run.

But I digress.

One of the comments at the WaPo grabbed my attention, and if anybody’s got more information on this, please, share it—either in the comments or via email (marmotshole@gmail.com):

This is a video made in Bedlam bar in Itaewon in January 2011. All the people were paid actors / actresses. The director is Korean and wanted to get famous for doing some edgy viral videos. This is one of them. He tried to release this over 2 years ago and nothing happened all the websites took it down for its graphic content. I know all this because I am one of the men in this video. I do not condone the actions that I did. But this was a paid acting job no one was hurt. The actress was wearing fake gums to make her teeth look bad and everyone left the shoot smiling and shaking hands.

I have passed on this webpage to the director asking him to come forward. It is up to him if he wants to reveal himself. 2 and a half years ago he wanted this kind of fame I do not know if it will do his current career any good.

Could be true. Could be complete BS. Would be interesting to get verification one way or the other.

Well, you have to admit at least that racial and misogynist abuse sounds better with a brogue

I’d seen the full version of this video on Facebook this morning. Wasn’t going to post it because the girl’s face was visible, but the Seoul Shinmun—bless their hearts—has remedied that issue:

Jesus. Just to note, the full-length version is much worse—as a Facebook friend puts it: “The original is 90 seconds. The number of ways they manage to be obnoxious in that time is something else.”

The video—seemingly shot at a club—has been spreading like wildfire on Korean online communities and through SNS.

What’s unclear is who shot it where and when. I imagine, though, that we’ll soon learn the details.

What I ask my Korean and Korean-American readers, though, is this—what is it about white Western culture that fosters such behaviour?

American English teacher indicted for up-skirt videos

Yonhap reports that a 45-year-old American English teacher has been indicted for using his iPod camera to secretly record some 306 up-skirt videos.

The alleged perv—a teacher at a famous language academy in Seoul—shot his work at public places like the subway between May 8 and May 15. Or so he is charged.

Police say he shot videos of the thighs, butts and other parts of women wearing short skirts or shorts as they climbed the steps or stood on inclines.

English teachers get their own editorial in the Kukmin Ilbo

The recent deportation of an American English teacher suspected of sexually assaulting a minor in the United States eight years ago inspired the Kukmin Ilbo to pen an editorial on the English teacher menace.

Namely, the paper notes that the current E-2 visa system checks only to see if you’ve been convicted of a crime; it does not check if you’re wanted on suspicion of want. This means murders and rapists could run away to Korea to teach English and nobody would know. The drug check, too, determine whether you’ve done drugs only within the two weeks prior to the test. There has also been a lack of info sharing between investigative bodies like the cops and educational authorities despite what the paper describes as an endless string of drug offenses by foreign English teachers; this lack of sharing makes managing the foreign teacher population difficult.

The bigger problem, says the paper, are the unqualified teachers who enter Korea on tourist visas. Demand for teachers outstrips supply—there are currently about 20,000 foreigners in Korea on E-2 visas, but the number of foreigners teaching English is reportedly far greater. Anyway, the Kukmin Ilbo thinks the government needs to tighten up the foreign teacher hiring and oversight system and wants to see effective measures taken.

The Dong-A Ilbo has more on the case. According to them, the American—who’d been teaching in the Jeollabuk-do area for eight years—was wanted in the States on charges of sexually assaulting a female relative under 12 at his home four times in 2003. A commenter at GI Korea seems to think he knows the guy and give much more detail, but all the caveats about anonymous commenters apply.

Suspected American pedophile caught in Korea

This is just great:

An American man suspected of sexually abusing minors in the United States has been arrested in South Korea after an eight-year-long international manhunt, police here said Friday.

The 44-year-old suspect, whose identity has been withheld, is suspected of raping minors in the U.S. state of Kentucky four times between August and October 2003, according to the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency (SMPA).

The suspect entered South Korea in 2004 via Thailand, the SMPA said, adding that he has since been working as an English tutor at private institutions, elementary schools, and universities in the southwestern Jeolla provinces, it added.

Amazing Raylan Givens hadn’t caught him earlier.

Now, you’d think the tightened E-2 regs would have prevented something like this. Apparently not, though:

한편 지난 2010년 7월 회화지도 강사에 대한 사증발급지침 변경으로 비자신청시 범죄경력조회서가 요구되자 A 씨는 지난해 9월께 미국 범죄경력조회서를 FBI(미 연방수사국)로부터 우편으로 발급받아 제출한 것으로 알려졌다. 하지만 이 조회서엔 확정된 판결만 기재될 뿐 수사중이거나 수배된 사실은 기록되지 않아 E-2비자 재발급에 아무런 문제가 없었던 것으로 확인됐다.

외국인 출입국 관리와 회화지도 자격 비자 발급에 큰 허점이 드러난 셈이다.

So, just so we’re clear, you’re saying the FBI criminal checks teachers are supposed to submit DON’T include whether the guy is wanted or under investigation? Seriously?

The Korean cops are saying he hasn’t done anything in Korea and that they’ll simply extradite the guy to the United States. Frankly, though, given that a) he’s been in the country since 2004, and b) if the charges are true, he enjoys raping children, I find it hard to believe he didn’t do anything here. I hope the cops thoroughly investigate every aspect of this guy’s life for the last eight years before turning him over to the Americans.

When pot, gyopos and USFK mail collide

Seoul’s Finest have busted a Korean-American by the name of Park for not only turning his Yongsan home into an indoor pot farm, but also using USFK mail to smuggle pot in from the United States (HT to Mryouknowwho).

Park was growing 57 pot plants at him home, where he built in indoor greenhouse. Even had CCTV cameras installed for security.

According to MBC, Park had been deported from the United States after getting busted for marijuana possession. Personally, I find this difficult to believe—if beating your girlfriend and then getting fingered by Russian intelligence as a possible jihadi isn’t enough to get you thrown out of the United States, I can’t imagine ICE showing a Korean dude the door toking up.

Park is claiming he was growing it for his own personal consumption since life’s been tough and growing it is cheaper. Plus, it’s got that whole DIY hispter cool factor.

Park was caught with 435 grams of gear, enough to sell to 8,700 people. He’d also been using USFK’s post system—which receives easier screenings by customs and is punished lighter for violations (or so says MBC)—to smuggle pot in.

Four months ago, a former GI was arrested for using USFK mail to smuggle in some new sort of drug.

A customs official at Incheon International Airport said with drug smuggling via USFK mail on the rise, USFK and the customs office were closely cooperating. Last year, Incheon Airport customs caught 2,800 grams of drugs being smuggled through USFK mail, over seven times the amount of the previous year.

I believe that should be ‘yeppEUN gongju’

This—well, really, the whole Tumblr—is hella funny.

Mrs. Marmot was particularly amused by how he felt the need to explain the meaning of “Twinkie.”

(HT to Wangkon)

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