The Marmot's Hole

Korea... in Blog Format

Author: WangKon936 (page 2 of 35)

Is Newsweek owned by a Korean Christian?

Newsweek, like many old traditional print news sources, is getting hammered by declining readership and circulation.  In August 2013, dying Newsweek was sold to International Business Times (“IBT”).

So, who owns IBT?  Apparently, it is a privately owned enterprise with two main shareholders, founders Etienne Uzac and Johnathan Davis.  However, there has been a wealth of information uncovered that IBT, and its founders, have very close ties with Olivet University founder David Jang.  Olivert is a Christian evangelical university and David Jang is a evangelical Christian leader who may have controversial religious and secular views.  Billy Graham’s Christianity Today accuses Jang of unorthodox religious views such as Jang claiming to be the second coming of Christ.

Of course, when one links “second coming of Christ” and “Korean religious leader” the first thing one may think of is the late Unification Church leader Sun Myung Moon.  The Guardian actually tries to link Jang with the Moonies, whereas Mother Jones thinks the link is now dead (David Jang went to Moonie meetings when he was younger, but now rejects that church and its teachings).  A cursory review of Olivet University’s mission statement would also indicate that its theology is not compatible with the Unification Church.

Anyways, what’s really gotten the press riled up is the possible association of a stalwart of left leaning news to right leaning religious organizations.  Both Jang and the founders of IBT appear to support controversial anti-gay conversion therapies, where individuals go through programs to reduce same sex attraction and increase opposite sex attraction.

Disclaimer: “Very close ties” and “Legal ownership stake” are two very different things.  Currently, there is no conclusive proof that Jang owns IBT.  The connections are certainly deep and “interesting,” and may be more so as this story develops.

Korean words starting to get loaned into Chinese

I would be the first person to admit many Chinese loan words have made it into Korean.  However, it’s interesting when there are reports that the reverse is happening.

The Chosun Ilbo reports that due to the popularity of Korean dramas in China, Korean terms such as “oppa” (오빠) and “ajumma” (아줌마) are entering Chinese popular vernacular.  The Chinese, however, are putting different meanings behind the words.  오빠, which in Korean can mean anything from a female’s older brother to a female’s older male friend or even boyfriend/lover, has adopted the Chinese characters “,” pronounced “ou-pa” in Mandarin and the meaning of “…amorous feelings toward the subject.”

Ajumma/아줌마?  Well, the Chinese already has a popular word for “auntie,” (阿姨/āyí in Mandarin) the rough equivalent of “아줌마” so it’s adopted the meaning of “…to refer to tough women.”

The Philippines officially orders 12 F/A-50s

The Filipino air force is a joke.  The last jet fighters they had were the old F-5 Freedom Fighters that they retired in 2005.  Even their Defense Secretary teased, “Our Air Force… [is]… all air without force.”

China lays claim to much of the South China Sea (particularly the Spratly Islands) and have routinely violated the Philippines’ territorial claims with both military aircraft and ships.  As of now, the Filipinos have nothing to send in response, other than unintimidating prop planes, patrol boats and antiquated destroyers.  Although the Filipinos do not officially acknowledge they are seeking weapons to counter Chinese incursions, they are essentially trying to obtain specific weapons to counter Chinese incursions.

Yesterday, the Philippines and Korea signed a contract to provide 12 F/A-50 light fighter-bombers, within 38 months, for about $420 million.  As both a war capable plane and a trainer is it the be all and end all for what the Philippines needs to counter China?  No.  But, the Philippines is not a rich country and cannot afford to buy and maintain more capable planes such as Saab’s Gripen, the F-16C (Block 40 or better), the Sukhoi Su-27, etc.  Plus, they are nine years out of practice in flying jet fighters and probably couldn’t use top-of-the line planes to their fullest capabilities because they have no training infrastructure.  The Filipinos themselves acknowledge that the F/A-50 was the best they can do for now.

Manila buys fighter jets worth $520m

(Photo credit: Oman Daily Observer)

Predictably, the Chinese were not happy with this news.  Rumor has it (from the Chosun Ilbo via the Yomiuri Shimbun) that a “Chinese official” made a request to the Park administration to not sell the jets, which Korea reportedly ignored.

So, what could the Chinese hypothetically send against Filipino F/A-50s?  It would have to have long range, so probably Sukhoi Su-27s or Sukhoi Su-30MKK.  Head to head does an F/A-50 have a snowball’s chance in hell against an Su-30MMK?  Most likely not.  An Su-30 is faster, more powerful, has advanced beyond visual range (“BVR”) missiles and sensor driven helmet mounted displays that control “off-boresight” weapons.  However, the F/A-50 has something that may save it: Link-16.  The Philippines are buying long range ground based radars that they will station near the Spratlys.  If linked with the F/A-50s then they can see Chinese planes before Chinese planes can see them, thus giving the F/A-50s a fighting chance, particularly if they are armed with their own BVR missiles.

Lastly, as I had mentioned before, the procurement pattern for the T-50 family of jets appears to belie the fact that it was originally designed as a trainer.  The customers (namely Iraq and the Philippines) want this supposed “trainer” to fight.  As a cheap jet fighter in a “stop gap” role it may not be all that bad.  Smaller and poorer nations don’t have a lot of choices.  Back in the Cold War the Soviets and the Americans sold their poorer client states cheap and easy to maintain Mig-21 Fishbeds and F-5 Freedom Fighters.  America and Russia don’t offer these planes (or modern facsimiles) anymore so there is a market need.  At the end of the day the T-50 family might be a better 21st century F-5 than a 21st century version of a T-38.

Next up?  KAI is pitching the T-50 family to the UAE, PeruBotswana, Thailand, not to mention the U.S. T-X program (in conjunction with Lockheed).

Andrei Lankov: North Korea can feed itself

Surprise, surprise, by and large yes says Andrei Lankov.  We here at TMH haven’t quoted or linked to Dr. Lankov for awhile since his regular Korea Times column ceased.  It doesn’t mean he isn’t eminently quotable or linkable.  It’s just been harder to find his latest musings without a regular column to go to.

Andrei appears to be freelancing more nowadays: Asia Times, Russia Beyond the Headlines and Al Jazeera.  Yes, Al Jazeera.  Andrei’s latest piece is in today’s Al Jazeera editorial section where he makes the claim that North Korea isn’t starving and can in fact feed itself:

One of the most commonly cited cliches is that North Korea is a “destitute, starving country”. Once upon a time, such a description was all too sadly correct: In the late 1990s, North Korea suffered a major famine that, according to the most recent research, led to between 500,000 and 600,000 deaths. However, starvation has long since ceased to be a fact of life in North Korea.

[...]

The gradual improvement in the food situation is closely related to changes in other areas of North Korea’s economic life. Contrary to what a majority of lay people tend to believe, the last decade has been one of moderate economic growth north of the DMZ.

Quest for the T-X Holy Grail

The original rational for Korea Aerospace and Lockheed’s cooperation in developing the T-50 was to build a trainer that could qualify for the “whale” or “mother lode” account: America’s replacement for the venerable, but older than dirt, T-38 Talon.

KAI and Lockheed’s chief rival has always been Alenia Aermacchi’s M-346 Master.  In the global pre-battles between KAI and Alenia Aermacchi there have been wins and losses.  Alenia drew first blood with a win in Singapore.  Then KAI won an order from Indonesia.  Alenia won Israel.  KAI got a big order from Iraq.  Alenia won a modest order from Poland.  KAI is apparently dotting the i’s and crossing the t’s with the Philippines.  It’s been back and forth for the past four years.

However, all this is early dress rehearsal for the estimated 350 new jet trainers that the U.S. Air Force will need.  This is, to say the least, a huge account, that neither side can afford to lose, thus both are playing to win.  Alenia has partnered with General Dynamics, one of the largest U.S. based aerospace companies, and has offered to manufacture the M-346 at General Dynamics’ plants in Arizona and North Carolina.  Needless to say the Koreans and Lockheed are probably dreaming up the same manufacturing arrangement in order to buyrecruit the support of influential Congressman.

Today’s Flightglobal has an excellent summary analysis (with a lot of pretty pictures) of the upcoming battle:

Richard Aboulafia, vice-president of analysis at Teal Group, calls the KAI/Lockheed T-50 Golden Eagle the “most capable” option – but also probably the most expensive to buy and operate. Lockheed declines to discuss prices, but Aboulafia estimates the T-50’s flyaway cost will be $26 million per aircraft.

[...]

The T-50, which has been in service since the mid-2000s, can reach Mach 1.5 and pull 8g, Lockheed says. The type’s single General Electric F404 engine also has an afterburner. “If the [USAF] has the budget, and they want [pilots] to [transition] easily into an F-22 or F-35, the T-50 is the choice,” says Aboulafia.

The BAE/Northrop Hawk option is the cheapest at an estimated $21 million per, but they are clearly the dark horse in this fight.  The Alenia Aermacchi option is in the middle at an estimated $24 million per.

Aboulafia says Alenia Aermacchi’s T-100 – a derivative of its M-346 trainer – holds the middle ground. The aircraft are “very modern”, have “great flying characteristics” and will likely cost about $24 million each, he estimates. The M-346 (below) is powered by two Honeywell F124-200 turbofans, can pull 8g and reach 590kt at 5,000ft (1,520m), according to Alenia Aermacchi.

[...]

“It’s a good compromise,” says Aboulafia of the T-100. “The market has spoken to that. Israel and Singapore [are] two of the most prestigious militaries around.”

Here is a blog with an interesting (but technical) specification comparison between the two jets.

It will be an interesting, hard fought battle between the two.  I am not normally a betting man, but looking at the selection process I would say that the M-346 Master has the edge if a pure trainer is what you are looking for.  Key U.S. allies with similar air power doctrines have the M-346 or have it on order (Singapore, Poland and Israel).  Out of all the KAI wins, only Indonesia has selected the T-50 as a pure trainer.  The procurement history would favor the M-346 and imply that the T-50 a bit of an underdog.  However, as it often happens, the USAF may want the “Cadillac” option and if so, then that would give the T-50 the edge.

USAF%20T-50.jpg

(Photo credit: Flightglobal)

Lockheed says Korea officially selecting the F-35

In a drawn out courtship affair with more twists and turns than Luke and Laura, Ross and Rachel, or even 길라임 and 김주원, it looks like Korea has finally pulled the trigger on officially picking a winner for their F-X (phase 3) bid.  The results were a bit of a forgone conclusion after the F-15SE was rejected last year, but (drum roll, please) the ROK has selected Lockheed Martin’s F-35 Lightening II.

According to a Lockheed’s press release:

 The Republic of Korea has formally announced its decision to procure the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II aircraft for its F-X fighter acquisition program.

[...]

Following a comprehensive evaluation process for their F-X program, the Republic of Korea becomes the third Foreign Military Sales country to procure the F-35, joining Israel and Japan who selected the F-35A in 2010 and 2011, respectively.

My thoughts?  Personally, I am not too enthusiastic regarding the F-35.  Much of the independent press has been bad.  The Aussies don’t think it’s all that stealthy.  The think tank Rand Corporation doesn’t think it’s all that maneuverable and is underpowered to boot.  The Australians needed a lot of convincing and are still not completely on board yet.  The Canadians are wavering.  Even an American general made the amazing admission that the F-35 might not be all that useful without an F-22 riding shotgun (i.e. watching its “6″) for it.

Well, the Korean government originally wanted the F-15SE.  It was the Korean air force that insisted on the F-35 (particularly a few dodgy ex-generals).

The good news is that the ROK’s purchase should make unit costs lower (via “economies of scale”) for the U.S. and her participating allies.  Lockheed will apparently provide some (potentially restricted?) unspecified technical help for the development of the KF-X.  I’m sure there are plenty of people in Ft. Worth, Texas happy with the order, not to mention Lockheed shareholders.

American troopers in “Real Men”

As you all know every healthy Korean male is suppose to serve a two year stint in the armed forces.  It ain’t easy and it ain’t relished by most Korean men.  However, some time after their service, many Korean men develop strangely nostalgic memories of their service.  The Korean has a good series on this here and here.

Capitalizing on this phenomenon is MBC’s reality show “Real Men” where older Korean actors relive their days in the military for the benefit of their television audiences.  Surprisingly, the show has become popular with women who want to know a little bit of what their men had gone through.

Any ways, now “Real Men” has started to have troops from the U.S. 2nd Infantry Division interact with the Korean stars.  The American troopers, for example, don’t seem to mind eating Korean food.  What’s the first thought that runs across the Koreans’ minds when they see the non-Korean faces?  “Gosh, my English sucks.”  A surprising number of the American troops knew some Korean.  The cross cultural exchange is “interesting,” to say the least.

‘진짜 사나이’ 샘 해밍턴 “250원 바나나라떼 정말 맛있어” 극찬

(Photo credit edaily)

The battle for Japan’s soul

It get’s rather tempting sometimes in blogs like this to discuss the Japanese as a monolith and generalize.  That they collectively think or feel a certain way.  That they, as a group, do not think or care about what they did during World War II or the decades before.  Additionally, it would be tempting to say that they, as a group, are leaning towards historical amnesia to all the bad things they did for much of the first half of the 20th century.

As evidence you have the increasing right tilt of their current majority government- the LDP, anti-Korean protests in Tokyo’s Koreatown, Neo-Nazism, sanitation of their history text books, etc.  There is even the apparent white washing of their Imperial war past by renowned animator and film maker Hayao Miyazaki.

Could it mean there is a tilt in Japanese politics and society to forget the unsavory things they did during the Showa Era?  Worse still, could it mean that Japan is reversing itself to adopt a greater military stance against its neighbors?

Perhaps, but this isn’t the whole story.  Anti-Korean protests are met by large (sometimes largeranti-racism or pro-Korean protests and groups of Koreans and Japanese band together to clean up anti-Korean graffiti.

Then there is this:

(Photo credit: War is Boring, via Drawn and Quarterly)

Above is a sample from Shigeru Mizuki‘s recent manga, “Showa 1926-1939: A History of Japan.”  For those of you who don’t know, Mizuki, age 92, is one of Japan’s premiere manga cartoonists, particularly horror genres,  and a veteran of World War II.  His recent manga on the Showa Era shows remarkable honesty to the brutality of Japan’s Imperialistic policies, particularly against the Chinese and Koreans.  Excellent post over at War is Boring offers a good summary.

Could there be a conflict brewing in Japanese society?  One that is battling for Japan’s soul?

Norihiro Kato, professor of modern Japanese literature at Wasada University, has an excellent op-ed in the New York Times on the subject, where he argues that Hello Kitty is a symbol of Japanese denial of their war time atrocities, Godzilla is a symbol of Japan’s sense of victimhood and unresolved pain of losing World War II.  The over “cutification” of their popular culture a result of Japan’s inability to properly face-up and resolve their history.

Hello, America. Is your cheese more expensive?

Well, it would appear so.  A pound of American cheese on the open market is $2.22 (as of March 6th, 2014) vs. $1.56 a year ago.  And it’s getting more expensive.  As a matter of fact, some investors worry that the age of cheap pizza may end because of the rapid rise in cheese prices.  What?  You mean the end of $9.99 extra large pepperoni pizza, with free garlic bread, and a second medium sized pizza for two bucks more?  Dammit!  There goes my football party.  Who do I go and blame?

According to the news blog Quartz, it’s the Koreans.  They love their cheese and they are buying more than ever due to the KORUS FTA.  The Koreans seem to be drizzling cheese on everything from corn to ramen, to their crime againstversion” of  “pizza,” or eating it straight as a snack.

Times are good for American dairy farmers. They are selling milk at the highest prices on record, up 17% in January on the previous year.
That’s surprising, because US consumers aren’t demanding more milk…

[...]

South Korea blew past Japan and Canada in 2008 to become the number two market for US cheese.

Here’s some data:

Top-importers-of-US-cheese-as-a-percentage-of-total-cheese-exports-2003-2013_chartbuilder

Holy, gorgonzola! That’s a lot of cheddar.

Korean drama about aliens, love and fried chicken big in China

Yep.  That’s the unlikely premise of “My Love From the Star.”  Strange plot aside, I’m sure it doesn’t hurt that the lovely Jun Ji-hyun is staring.

A pretty good performer in Korea, with an average ratings of 22.6%, it is apparently at least as popular, and probably a good deal more popular, in China.  In one of the episodes, Jun Ji-hyun’s character apparently has a love for fried chicken and this has lead to mobs of Chinese to form enormous lines at Korean fried chicken places.

It isn’t just food where hilarity has ensued.  In a recent Washington Post article, it would appear that Chinese government officials are talking about the drama as well and bemoaning the fact that Korea’s drama making skills are so much better than theirs:

“Well aware of the craze the drama has created in China, one committee of China’s political advisory body (called the CPPCC) spent a whole morning bemoaning why China can’t make a show as good and as big of a hit.”

Ah, a proud moment for kimchi-cheerleaders?  Maybe not.  What Wang Qishan, head of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection and perhaps one of China’s top seven Communist Party leaders, said about the issue may be rather unsettling, if you are Korean:

“The core and soul of the Korean opera is a distillation of traditional Chinese culture,” Wang said. “It just propagates traditional Chinese culture in the form of a TV drama.”

I get it.  At the end of the day everything in Asia ultimately belongs to China!  I love how he turned that around.  Bravo, bravo.  Very smart Mr. Wang.  Very smart indeed.

UPDATE:

Here’s more on Wang Qishan and Korean dramas and a fuller version of his “quote”:

Wang then attributed Korean telenovelas’ success to their “Chinese spirit”.

“Sometimes I watch Korean dramas on and off. After watching for a long time, I realised I understood why Korean dramas are ahead of ours,” said Wang, who is known for a keen interest in popular culture.

“I’ve been wondering why Korean dramas have [invaded] China. How can they cross the ocean and influence the US and even Europe? In the past few years, they have come out with a Gangnam Style.

“The core and spirit of Korean dramas is the exact sublimation of Chinese traditional culture,” Wang was quoted by the newspaper as saying. “They use TV dramas to disseminate Chinese traditional culture.”

He is apparently also a fan of NetFlix’s House of Cards and has a bit of a reputation as an anti-corruption “tsar.”

This has caused buzz among  Chinese news sources who are trying to interpret what Wang is saying.  A Sina.com editorial thinks Wang is directly criticizing Chinese cultural officials.  The Zhengzhou Evening Post blamed China’s backward cultural bureaucracy and censorship for the failure.  Some media outlets believed Wang’s remarks were meant to encourage government officials to be open-minded and engage more actively with the young online community.

The other side of the cosmetics and plastic surgery discussion

When it comes to the topic of plastic surgery, many people take a “good or bad” value position.  The unofficial consensus is if a lot of it is done to a normal face then it’s “bad,” but if it’s done to restore looks lost due to an accident, then it is generally thought of as “good.”

When it comes to South Korea, much of the press is negative and borders on reporting mostly on the strange and/or weird such as the so-called “tower of jaw bones,” the proliferation of plastic surgery ads in Gangnam-gu, startling before and after shots, or the fact that South Korea undergoes the highest number of plastic surgery procedures per capita in the world.

Korean culture, particularly modern urban culture, puts an extraordinary amount of emphasis on outward appearance.  Clearly, sociological pressures play a decisive role.  Interestingly enough, there is pressure on the supply-side too.  Korean doctors essentially have their incomes capped by price controls mandated by the National Health Insurance plan, so there is pressure to turn to plastic surgery to escape limits on their pay.  All this has created a massive aesthetics-based business of cosmetics companies, skin care clinics and plastic surgeons.

All points well taken from a position that’s attracted a lot of attention, debate and discussion.  IMHO, criticism of Korean sociological pressures and aesthetics culture is not without merit.

However, is it all bad?  If we are to take perhaps subjective values out of the equation and just look at economic impact, then is this all “bad,” per se?  From an economic and business perspective, Korea’s highly demanding aesthetics culture is creating an expertise, technology and infrastructure base that’s become the core of a highly developed cosmetics and plastic surgery industry.  It’s an industry that’s so developed it is attracting considerable overseas demand, particularly in medical tourism and cosmetics.  The big prize is China’s aesthetics market, for which Korea may be uniquely positioned to capture a greater share of than more established players in Japan (i.e. Shinseido), France (i.e. L’Oreal) and the U.S. (i.e. Procter & Gamble).  From a plastic surgery standpoint, Chinese patients now make up the largest percentage of medical tourists visiting Korea.

Tremendous domestic demand and emphasis on quality is creating a “virtuous cycle” of sorts, that’s in turn supporting an industry that’s becoming increasingly more attractive to a lot of non-Koreans.  The demand translates into sales and profits, which creates additional capital to be available to fund more product and service improvements and to keep comparative costs down due to efficient capacity utilization and expansion of economies of scale.  This creates even more non-domestic demand, further expanding and accelerating the cycle and thus giving Korea, Inc. yet another industry to hang its hat on.

The KF-X merry-go-round

Discussions regarding an indigenous fifth generation fighter jet have been swirling around the halls of Korean government, military and industry ever since President Kim Dae-jung blabbed about it way back in 2001 at some Air Force cadet graduation ceremony.  13 years later, it’s still mostly talk.  Sure, we got a few scale mock-ups, drawings, etc.  We may have some “just for shits and giggles” nascent technical drawings someplace too.

According to DefenseNews, here is the latest:

The state-funded Agency for Defense Development (ADD) has long studied a twin-engine concept, either of the C103 design that looks somewhat like the F-35 or the C203 design following the European approach and using forward canards in a stealth-shaped airframe.

Both of the twin-engine platforms would be powered by two 18,000-pound engines, ADD officials said.

Korea Aerospace Industries, on the other hand, prefers a single-engine concept, dubbed C501, which is to be built based on the FA-50, a light attack aircraft version of the T-50 supersonic trainer jet co-produced by Lockheed Martin.

The C501, powered by a 29,000-pound engine, is designed to be fitted with a limited low-observable configuration and advanced avionics.

Ah, the C501 vs. the C103.  The choices that a medium sized country with a limited aerospace budget has when it comes to developing stealth.  C103 will be the hard way and very expensive, but tempting for those who want to have a jet that can be spoken in the same breath as China’s J-20, Russia’s T-50 or America’s F-35.  The C501 is the easier way and more realistic for a country that doesn’t have unlimited fighter development budgets.  It will, however, create what may be just a stealthy, but up engined, version of an FA-50, with limited stores for weapons or future upgrades.

“The Japanese are waiting for us to die”

The UK’s Daily Mail published an AP article today regarding the plight of the so-called “comfort women” residing in the House of Sharing in Korea.  Included in the article are quite a few pictures and some videos.

There are only 55 women left alive at the House of Sharing and their average age is 88.  The chance to offer an acceptable apology to the survivors of Imperial Japan’s comfort women system is rapidly coming to an end.

“… the women may also be the last chance for America’s two most important Asian allies to settle a dispute that has boiled over in recent years, as more of the so-called “comfort women” die and Tokyo and Seoul trade increasingly bitter comments about their bloody history.

“It will be much harder to solve, or more realistically mitigate, the issue after these women pass away,’ Robert Dujarric, an Asia specialist at Temple University’s Tokyo campus, said in an email. ‘Now, there are people — the former sex slaves — to apologize to. Afterward, there will be no one left to receive the apology.”

Comfort woman survivor Kim Gun-ja puts things in starker terms:

“The Japanese are waiting for us to die.”

Vietnam requests Korea cancel their official observance of the 50 Year Anniversary of the Vietnam War

Originally posted on Segye and Newsis, but the Segye release translated into English on Korea Bang, apparently the Vietnamese government has asked the Republic of Korea to cancel official commemorative events marking the 50th anniversary of South Korean troops being deployed to [the now defunct state of] South Vietnam.

According to a “South Korean government official” (“정부 관계자는”):

“The year 2014 is the 50th anniversary of the Korean army deployment to the Vietnam War, and the preparations for a commemorative event are under way in collaboration of the Ministry of Patriots and Veterans Affairs (MPVA) and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA). We recently received a request from the Vietnamese government to refrain from holding a commemoration, placing the government in a predicament.”

The requests sounds legit, although I’ve only been able to find two Korean language publications that have reported it and both seem to be citing the same source.

Anyways, the Korean comment chatter appears to be quite sympathetic to the stated request.  Korea Bang has been kind enough to translate many of the comments:

박감독: Don’t hold a ceremony. The deployment to kill people was anything but something to be proud of. I am sorry for the Vietnamese people. I hope that we will skip the ceremony, and express our condolences.

초록빛: I support the Vietnamese government’s stance. Consider how we slammed Japan’s Prime Minister Abe’s visit to the Yasukuni Shrine. If South Korea keeps on upholding our past, it will impose obstacles to the future partnership between the two countries. I don’t think highlighting veterans’ participation in the Vietnam War will boost military morale and honor. I think it is right to completely embrace the Vietnamese government’s request.

I hear ya Vietnam, but good luck in getting the commemorative events cancelled while Korea is under the Park Geun-hye administration.  Her daddy did send over the troops, you know.

Yet another editorial piece on how the U.S. should get out of Korea, but this time from… Al Jazeera?

Well, more accurately from John Glaser, a conservative “free-lance” journalist who has written for The Huffington Post, Al Jazeera English, The American Conservative, and The Daily Caller.

But how necessary is it, really, to continue to fight on one side of a stalemated civil war that has lasted for more than 60 years? Politicians in Washington insist it is in our vital national interest, but that is far from the truth.

[...]

To this day, the U.S. backs South Korea. Washington has security guarantees with Seoul obligating the U.S to go to war against South Korea’s enemies in the event conflict breaks out. Americans are told they must spend taxpayer money providing military aid and paying expensive operating costs for tens of thousands of U.S. troops so that South Korea is properly defended.

But Seoul can easily defend itself. South Korea’s GDP is $1.13 trillion, versus North Korea’s paltry$40 billion, with similar disparities in the sizes of their respective defense budgets.

He seems to be particularly irked that an extra armored battalion from the 1st Cavalry Division will be deploying from Ft. Hood, Texas, to bolster the 28k troops already there.  Any ways, at least in this article John pretty much sounds like a Doug Bandow clone so fans of Doug will immediately recognize Mr. Glaser’s tone.

John’s got a blog (hosted by antiwar.com) that could be interesting to neo-isolationiststhose who want America to largely withdraw from international affairs.

This I found quite interesting.  John links to a Congressional report discussing the costs and benefits of continued American Empireability to react militarily to threats around the world and to sustain the military advantage it has earned as a result of winning World War II.  Could be good reading to some.

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