The Marmot's Hole

Korea... in Blog Format

Author: R. Elgin (page 1 of 57)

The Letter “D” as in . . .

Defamation is a problem for many in Korea, whose enforcement (or lack of enforcement) quite often infringes upon free speech, if not democracy itself.  The Wall Street Journal has a good, short piece on this issue here.

Have You Seen This Man?

CYH

Apparently, he was reported to be in the vicinity of the Blue House but there is some disagreement with this sighting and there are concerns that more than this man may be missing.  If you spot him, please call the Segye Ilbo, since they have invested some effort in locating this fellow.

Open Thread – December 13, 2014 – Have an Asian Christmas

Japanese xmas

Ho, ho, ho . . .

Have A Jazz Christmas and A Happier New Year Too

poster_2014_web_version

This year, try celebrating the holiday season with some Jazz – the Ronn Branton Group is performing at Seoul Arts Center, on the 21st (IBK Chamber Hall) and Christmas Eve at JangCheon Hall (Apkujeongdong).  This year, he has a great lineup of musicians from the U.S. and Germany, performing original arrangements of Christmas songs and seasonal favorites.  For tickets, in English, just call 010-3817-7214.

Open Thread – The Civil Forfeiture Edition

Say what you will about Korean police but they don’t do anything like this or this  because of the worst has been deemed proper.

Have a good weekend.

The Taxman Cometh – What Would Jesus Do?

The National Assembly’s Strategy and Finance Committee held a  meeting with representatives of various religious faiths (Catholic, Evangelical Protestant and Buddhist) for the purpose of discussing how clergy should be taxed.  Their plan is to levy an income tax of 22 percent on 20 percent of the incomes earned by ordained clergy.  (cite)

Well, out of the three main faiths represented, guess which one threw a fit over the money and threatened fire and brimstone?

Here is a hint: which faith is well known for running a growth-for-profit scheme where the pastor has sole proprietorship of the church and runs some of the world’s most intensive missionary programs, not to mention urinating and defacing Buddhist temples and statues in Korea?

Continue reading

The DPRK vs. The World

Yesterday, the UN voted for a resolution that condemns North Korea for human rights abuses and for the first time recommends the prosecution of its leaders for crimes against humanity at theInternational Criminal Court.  The only question I have is will the DPRK’s long-standing mentor and supporter – the PRC – or the original instigator of trouble in the region – Russia – stand up and defend the backshooters?

As quoted in the linked article:

“If they want to be seen defending the human rights record of the worst human rights offender on the planet, let them do so in public and pay a price” (Sue Mi Terry, a senior research scholar at the Columbia University Weatherhead East Asian Institute and a former intelligence officer with the United States government, who specializes in North Korea.

Open Thread – The Stupid Politician Edition

Our stupid politician for this edition is Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who claimed that Muslims were in America long before Columbus or Amerigo Vespucci.  Erdogan made his outrageous claim during a conference of Latin American Muslim leaders in Istanbul (The Hugo Chávez Memorial Pork Bar-be-que) which is fitting since Erdogan and Chávez have much in common – an appetite for saying crazy shiz and dishing out corruption.

A Besmirched Reputation – Too Drunk For Korea?

Imagine receiving a letter from prospective employer, in Korea, that declines hiring you because of the reputation of Irish people loving their whisky too much.

Read the unbelievable article here.

If ever there was a case of defamation, this would be it.

Fabrication of Evidence – the NIS Saga Continues

A court has convicted two NIS (National Intelligence Service) counterintelligence officials of fabricating Chinese government documents to build a spy case against a refugee from North Korea.  An excellent article by Choe Sang-hun is to be found here.  The judge, Kim Woo-soo said:

(the agents) seriously obstructed the function of the criminal justice of the country, . . . they betrayed the trust the people placed in the National Intelligence Service when it gave it both power and responsibility.

This decision comes after so many mistakes from this agency and an administration that is not intent upon fixing them, though there is much said about such.

A Decent Japanese Village Vs. Ugly Hate Groups

korean_busters

Photo by Tyler Sipe, NYTimes

Martin Fackler of the New York Times has written an interesting report on a village in Japan that attempted to build a memorial to the Koreans that died from malnutrition and abuse, at the hands of Imperial Japan, however the village discovered that certain  Japanese hate groups don’t want this part of history visited again and they are very vocal in their efforts to hide the truth about war-time Japan.

Mr. Fackler attributes much of the evil efforts against the village as being directed by a Japanese internet group:

. . . Known collectively as the Net Right, these loosely organized cyberactivists were once dismissed as radicals on the far margins of the Japanese political landscape. But they have gained outsize influence with the rise of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s conservative government, which shares their goal of ending negative portrayals of Japan’s history, and with the acquiescence of a society too uninterested or scared to speak out. “I don’t blame the mayor for giving in,” said Mr. Mizuguchi, 79, an architect who guided a visitor to the site of the old airfield using a hand-drawn map. “I blame the rest of Japan for not speaking out to support us.

This Japanese hate group has been noticed before now, in their attacks against Koreans:

The demonstrators appeared one day in December, just as children at an elementary school for ethnic Koreans were cleaning up for lunch. The group of about a dozen Japanese men gathered in front of the school gate, using bullhorns to call the students cockroaches and Korean spies. Inside, the panicked students and teachers huddled in their classrooms, singing loudly to drown out the insults, as parents and eventually police officers blocked the protesters’ entry.
The December episode was the first in a series of demonstrations at the Kyoto No. 1 Korean Elementary School that shocked conflict-averse Japan, where even political protesters on the radical fringes are expected to avoid embroiling regular citizens, much less children. Responding to public outrage, the police arrested four of the protesters this month on charges of damaging the school’s reputation.
More significantly, the protests also signaled the emergence here of a new type of ultranationalist group. The groups are openly anti-foreign in their message, and unafraid to win attention by holding unruly street demonstrations. (cite)

Another very interesting article on Japanese racism and hate groups can be found here.

The article is here.

Some of the Real K-pop – LeeSA

LeeSa

LeeSA doing her cover of “Red”.

I have spent a good bit of time listening to chaebol music and, though the production skills are good, it leaves me wanting to hear something fresh – something fresh like LeeSA (리싸).  She has a great voice and her covers really do sound good, so much that I prefer listening to her version. Her version of “Red” is really nice.  The stripped down versions of these covers are great because the music is not hiding under a pile of audio tricks, sampling and ProTools plug-ins – Just basic mixing.

As happens with most indie Korean artists, LeeSA has a notable presence on youtube, which is lucky for listeners looking for something different from South Korea that has something to do with music and not “music business”.

Other great original songs, such as “Could You Stop that Smile” are here.

16 Concert-goers Dead in Seongnam

A failed ventilation grate at the fateful Seongnam concert.

At least sixteen people were killed after falling through a ventilation grate at a K-pop concert in Seongnam.  An English link is here. According to accounts:

. . . in the dense crowd, 20-30 people climbed on a grate over the deep ventilation shaft. Under their weight the grate gave way and the group fell through.

Photo: Yonhap News

UPDATE: The concert promoter has committed suicide shortly after being questioned by the police.

Korean Government Sabotages Kakao Talk

what_happenedDue to claims that the Government and prosecutors have been using Kakao Talk logs to monitor people, Kakao has taken a beating, resulting in over 400,000 users migrating to other applications that have off-shore servers and better security, such as Telegram (cite) (There are reports that even prostitutes that conduct business arrangements through Kakao have switched to Telegram due to security concerns.) I also use Telegram and it works well.

The government has reportedly done so for state security concerns as well as enforcing the infamous defamation laws.  According to one source:

Accusations by the New Politics Alliance for Democracy on alleged cyber monitoring by the government gained more credibility yesterday when it was reported that prosecutors are planning to monitor some key words on major portal sites that they believe would disturb “social order” and “defame” people, after which they would order the managers of those sites to delete the posts. (cite)

Kakao has responded by apologizing for allowing security concerns to mount:

Lee Sirgoo, CEO at DaumKakao which owns Kakao Talk, apologized for its initial handling of privacy issues at a news conference called at short notice by the company. The government’s recent announcement of stern punishment for what it called online rumors prompted many South Koreans to switch from Kakao Talk to foreign messaging services. . . Kakao Talk will introduce new privacy features to protect the information of its users, he said. Next year, it will begin deleting messages from its servers as soon as they have been read by the intended recipients. The company said it could face legal sanction by refusing to cooperate with warrants. . . .It has also adopted a new privacy mode, which uses end-to-end encryption, allowing chat records to be stored only on each user’s smart device and making it impossible for investigators to monitor the contents.  “We will continue to search for more necessary measures and make improvements down the road,” Lee said. “Kakao Talk has been growing on the back of users’ trust. We know it will take excruciating efforts to regain users’ trust,” Lee said.

Daum Kakao commands about 35 million local users for its flagship Kakao Talk in the country with a population of 50 million, compared to around 10 million users held by LINE, operated by Naver Corp. Kakao Talk also has about 152 million users worldwide through 15 languages, including Korean, English, Japanese, Spanish, German, Arabic and Russian. (cite)

As in America, if the government sabotages public confidence in software developers offerings, the result will likely be bad for business and a major setback for Korean software developers, who already have onerous burdens put upon them by government regulations.

Open Thread – October 11, 2014 – The Economic Dinosaur Edition

Just because the Korea Economic Research Institute hires old-school idiots that love felons does not mean you can’t enjoy this beautiful fall weather.

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