Fun with polls and surveys!

Some interesting surveys regarding Korea and Koreans, and their relationship with other countries, have come out.

First of all let’s look at some surveys regarding Korea’s attitudes on China.  According to one sponsored by the JoongAng Ilbo and the Asan Institute of Policy Studies, South Korea’s attitudes of the PRC have improved, particularly after President Xi Jinping’s state visit to Seoul recently.  Results summarized in the graphic below:

(Graphic source from the JoongAng Ilbo)

There are however, misgivings.  Most South Koreans think China is still an economic and military threat.  Also, since most Koreans have lungs, a whopping 95%+ hates China’s most pervasive (and unwanted) export: pollution.

The good ole’ U.S. of A also gets high marks.  According to the latest Pew Research results, South Korea’s “positive” attitudes of the U.S. are in the 82% region, up from 78% in 2013, the highest they have ever been since Pew has conducted the survey.  Only the Philippines (former colony) and Israel (fellow U.S. military aid dependant) had higher rankings.  According to the Pew, South Korea’s attitudes of China are comparatively in the 56% positive territory, a rise from 46% last year.

Lastly, non-Koreans (living outside of Korea) continue to admit they have a hard time distinguishing North from South Korea.  Ah, Egypt.  Not only do they hate the U.S. more than any other country out there, but they are the worst at telling the difference between North and South Korea.

  • redwhitedude

    I think people who think China will not take NK side in case of war are naive. Despite the feel good after Xi Jinping’s visit China continues to repatriate NK refugees to NK where they face certain death. Also as long as the Korean peninsula is divided China has ample opportunity to meddle in the Korean peninsula. I doubt they will be voluntarily willing to let go of that. What does this mean? Koreans will not fully trust China and popular feelings will fluctuate between highs and lows depending which issue takes prominence(illegal fishing by Chinese, pollution, NK refugees, comfort women, and so forth).

  • Aja Aja

    Yes but the US doesn’t love South Korea. This is like the jjak sarang that’s going on for decades now.

    And what’s up with Germany? Why do almost half of them have unfavorable views of the US? Even during Korea’s most dark days of anti-American feelings of ten, twelve years ago, doesn’t match the German poll numbers showing unfavorable feelings towards the US.

  • outofspace

    I’ve noticed this in real life as well. German people seem to have a lot of negative feelings toward the U.S. and its people, and those feelings usually manifest in the form of complaints about Americans being loud and stupid. Whether they’ve really just seen too many stupid tourists and businessmen pass through or dislike America for other reasons, I don’t know.

  • A Korean

    They are not “naive”, they are morons.

    Like rolypoiy said, fools die.

    Well, it’s a que for jinjoo. Oh, look, it’s JoonnAng Ilbo, jinjoo’s favorite paper.

  • A Korean

    Explains their love for Obama.

  • Bob Bobbs

    The number of (insanely naive) people who think that China will not take the North’s side in the June 25th war Part Deux dropped from 75.9% to 34.9% in two years? This is based on one session of Chinese glad-handing in Seoul? How…dynamic.

    As for the second survey: yes, yes telling the difference. Boooring.The thing that surprised me was the disappointment about not being seen as a democracy. Is South Korea a democracy?

  • http://www.rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    I’d imagine much of the anger comes from the spying revelations, although to be fair to the Americans, I suppose the Germans could ask themselves why the Americans feel the need to spy on them:

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/07/09/why-we-need-to-spy-on-the-germans.html

  • RElgin

    Germans are very naughty
    http://youtu.be/bQyjI7UsGTU

  • RElgin

    . . . kind of

  • Bob Bobbs

    I lived in Germany in 1991, and the dislike for Americans was there then, too. I recall watching Top Gun on TV and it being derided as “Nazi propaganda”. It is of course, but (many) Americans are pretty contemptuous of other cultures and nationalities. Why are you so surprised when the contempt is turned on you?

  • Bob Bobbs

    It might have something to do with carpet-bombing all of their cities and occupying their country for decades. Just a thought.

  • BSDetector

    I’m going to go ahead and call cheese on that WSJ chart where people claimed they could -easily- tell the difference between north and south Koreans. Give any of them a standard six-pack of headshots with 3 north and 3 south Koreans minus any tell tale olive drab clothiing, soldiers in the background pointing guns and shouting “everyone look happy or we open fire” and it’d be a guessing game plain and simple. The only remaining dead giveaway would be people with easy to spot plastic… ermm I mean reforming surgery. This is why we can’t have nice surveys, everyone’s a liar. :(

  • BSDetector

    Wow I’m a dummy. Absolutely prematurely commented on that chart. It’s about differentiating between the countries and not the people. I’m going to go and leave my original up there as a reminder to myself to RTFM.

  • Sumo294

    The reason why the Germans dislike Americans is that they have higher expectations for the culture that is supposed to be a superpower. They expect Americans to be the brightest, the most mannered, and the most reasonable people on planet Earth. They are surprised when they realize that the majority of Americans do not fit this bill. They are genuinely puzzled as to why America became a superpower and they wondered if their country could of been greater had it not been for the wars. Their dislike stems from their private disappointments with American culture–whom most Germans feel is inferior to their native culture.

  • eujin

    A lot of Germans know what happens when you get so paranoid you start spying on family and friends.

  • http://jushinjok.blogspot.com JinJoo

    “I think people who think China will not take NK side in case of war are naive.”

    The Asan Institute for Policy Studies also added:

    “The belief that China is unquestionably on North Korea’s side has certainly weakened over the past year. However, it is too early to say that the South Korean public trusts China under all contingencies. In contrast, when the same question was asked about the United States, 89.7% stated that the United States would help South Korea (Figure 8).Despite the ups and downs of the Korea-US alliance, South Koreans have a deep-seated trust in the United States when it comes to national security.”

  • http://jushinjok.blogspot.com JinJoo

    “Oh, look, it’s JoonnAng Ilbo, jinjoo’s favorite paper….”

    => ??????? To many Koreans (and I am one of these Koreans), JoongAng = 중국일보.

  • A Korean

    It’s a sarcasm. 돌려치는 말?

  • redwhitedude

    I’m pretty sure that as long the Korean peninsula is divided the Chinese will have a chance to meddle there and be in the thick of things there. Not sure if they are willing to let go of being able to influence there. Also not sure if China likes the idea of having SK absorb the north and push its borders right up to China.

  • redwhitedude

    Paranoia from the so called “patriot” act.

  • redwhitedude

    Just like the Stasi archives they have in Berlin. They managed to keep it locked up before all the contents were revealed in 1990.

  • redwhitedude

    The people that run the US are the few smart ones. A lot of the Americans are just slobs. It’s like the select few and then you got the mass of slobs.

  • redwhitedude

    Looking at the education system and the attitude towards it I’d say SK is not a democracy. Just look at how education was used in the Joseon period. It was used to socially stratify people those that became Yangban and those that couldn’t. You see somewhat of a carry over with things like those from SKY and then you have everybody else. SKY people tend to monopolize higher positions in government and so forth.

    You don’t see that in countries like the US eventhough Ivy tend to be overrepresented.

  • http://jushinjok.blogspot.com JinJoo

    “Not sure if they are willing to let go of being able to influence the peninsula….”

    China’s plan to annex Korea probably started right from the day when the Republic of Korea was established in 1945, even if it showed itself so concretely from the NTW administration.

    I am currently writing a post on Korea’s past and present governments which relates to how and when the Chinese influence started penetrating Korean society (based on observing what’s been going on).

    In Korea, without using the word “irony”, you can’t explain Korean politics.

    What would you say if the Minju (democratic) movement so wanted by Koreans was actually backed by Chinese money? What would you say if the majority of so-called pro- North Korean collaborators are in fact disguised pro-Chinese collaborators? Chinese spies are well known all over the world, but there isn’t even one reported case of a Chinese spy in Korea. Why would that be, knowing Korea is the very country China wants to eat first?

    KYS, the democratic movement’s politician, became the first civilian/ democratic president, and he provided the pro-Chinese environment. What could be more ironic than the fact that the PCH’s dictatorship, criticized by the majority of Koreans, actually protected Korea from being eaten by China?

  • http://jushinjok.blogspot.com JinJoo

    ^&^

  • redwhitedude

    As I said the biggest facilitator of Chinese influence is the fact that Korea is divided. All that political meddling is facilitated by that. Without it sucking up to China will be exposed as opposed to having to deal with China to deal with NK effectively.

  • ChuckRamone

    Oktoberfest is apparently a mega exhibition of drunken German boorishness. I call hypocrisy.

  • ChuckRamone

    alllooksame.com

  • wangkon936

    According to the Economist’s Democracy Index, South Korea is counted as a “full” democracy, ranked 20th, interestingly ranked higher than the U.S. which was ranked 21st, or Japan which was ranked 23rd:

    https://portoncv.gov.cv/dhub/porton.por_global.open_file?p_doc_id=1034

  • wangkon936

    Kinda like a Teutonic St. Patrick’s day, but lasts for a whole month instead of just a day?

  • eujin
  • ChuckRamone

    I visited a German friend in Munich after we studied together in Japan. I remember him complaining about Oktoberfest while I was there. I don’t recall any America blaming.

  • RElgin

    . . . What would you say if the majority of so-called pro- North Korean collaborators are in fact disguised pro-Chinese collaborators?

    That would explain the anti-USA-Mad Cow Demos here and in Taiwan as well as the anti-naval base (anti-USA) demos on Jejudo.

    Your contention here is not far fetched.

  • wangkon936

    “…biggest facilitator of Chinese influence is the fact that Korea is divided”

    There’s always been a lot of Chinese influence in Korea, but Korea wasn’t always divided. The biggest facilitator to Chinese influence in Korea has been China’s strength and importance as a state. Biggest eras of Chinese influence in Korea have been during the Tang, Song and Ming Dynasties, which incidentally were also among the best dynastic periods in Chinese history.

  • redwhitedude

    True but this is different. You’ve got a regime in China who wants to meddle in Korea and keep it divided on a peninsula that has been unified for about 1000 years at least.

  • redwhitedude

    USA beef protest was more about political opportunism rather than the actual issue with US beef. The left was trying to milk it as much as possible.

  • wangkon936

    Not really all that different. You didn’t think Tang China didn’t use those similar politics against the peninsular states of Koguryo, Silla and Baekje and make ’em battle each other?

    But any ways, Joseon was roughly the same size as the two Koreas and the Chinese never saw Joseon as threatening. I don’t really see how China can see even a united Korea as threatening. Unless they allow a major American fleet to permanently harbor at a major Korean port.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    The people that run America are the not-so-few backward and corrupt ones.

  • redwhitedude

    On Tang China it is history repeating itself. That division is what enabled it to dabble in the peninsula in the way that it did. However I would trust tang china more than communist china.

    China doesn’t like the idea of having a pro US Korea neighboring it so it is using NK as a buffer. When push comes to shove reunified Korea under SK will gravitate more towards US than it.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Let’s ask Park Chung Hee, or whatever that thing in the Blue House’s name is.

  • Bob Bobbs

    “It’s about differentiating between the countries and not the people.” Erm, not entirely. It’s about the news/entertainment/media from the countries. 트로트/뽕짝 is pretty darn no matter where it comes from, except that one sings about rose petals and sunshine and double-eyelid surgery and the other about building the West Sea Barrage and expanding production of pig iron. I would have hard time telling the difference, too.

  • redwhitedude

    That’s going retro not 21st century. Apparently the instructor is old school given how old she looks.

  • redwhitedude

    I guess plutocracy is a “full” democracy.

  • wangkon936

    So, corporal punishment at a middle school equates a country under a dictatorship? I don’t get you Bob. It’s like you have never taken a high school level civics class before.

    Your example is a non-sequitur to the question at hand.

  • wangkon936

    Dude, don’t blame me. Blame the Economist.

  • wangkon936

    19 U.S. states still allow corporal punishment:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/19-states-still-allow-corporal-punishment-2014-3

    Dude, are you like ignorant or something?

  • Bob Bobbs

    I ain’t hiding. It’s the language of love (and an official language of Canada). I think you mean decipher. Those kids have rights. Where are they? That woman follows totalitarian principles in a state classroom flying the Taegukgi. For shame. And no, I never took civics. C’est quoi, ça ?

  • Bob Bobbs

    BC banned it in the 1970s. Catch up, will ya’? http://www.repeal43.org/school-corporal-punishment/

  • Bob Bobbs

    I get the feeling that video is indeed from this century. The old hag…not so much.

  • redwhitedude

    Who says I was blaming you?

  • I AM IN ODE

    “Will China take Korea’s side?”…what is the touch-football?

  • wangkon936

    I know you have told me you were Canadian previously, but you have this aggressive form of moral superiority and exaggerated sense of self-righteous indignation that keeps making me think you are an American from a red state.

  • http://jushinjok.blogspot.com JinJoo

    There, of course, were/are authentic pro-North Korean collaborators, but having no money, North Korea could/can only do so much spying in South Korea. Eventually the pro-NK push decreased or joined together with pro-Chinese collaborators.

    My opinion is based on observing what’s been going on, so please regard it as an interesting (?) speculation.

  • wangkon936

    I know you have told me you were Canadian previously, but you have this aggressive form of moral superiority and exaggerated sense of self-righteous indignation that keeps making me think you are an American from a red state.

  • wangkon936

    Bob, so what? So what if there is corporal punishment in a middle school? I see no bearing on its relationship to Korea’s level of democracy. Why don’t you provide some level of educated commentary on the strength of the linkage, eh? If you can’t, then I have to conclude that you’re just being a troll.

  • wangkon936

    Okay then. Blame just the Economist… 😉

  • wangkon936

    Let’s wait and see how the PRC handles its upcoming “middle income trap” hurdle before we start comparing it to the Tang Dynasty.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/robert-samuelson-chinas-next-challenge/2014/03/19/739f112e-af7d-11e3-a49e-76adc9210f19_story.html

  • redwhitedude

    And probably worth disregarding at times.

  • redwhitedude

    At least the democracy in Korea can be entertaining. American Congress way too well behaved to be any fun to watch on C-Span. 😀

  • http://jushinjok.blogspot.com JinJoo

    The Chinese will never let go of being able to influence the peninsula…

    Contrary to what people have said in the past, China didn’t jump in and help North Korea. The reality is that China’s involvement during the Korean war between 1950 – 1953 is far more accurately as being that China was actually the one who initiated the Korean war

  • wangkon936
  • redwhitedude

    Given its political system not very well. If they really screw it up it could blow up in their faces. It’s going to be a rough road. However it seems like they conveniently ignore certain aspects of how Korea and Japan played out. They think it is a validation of heavy handed state involvement in the economy in “guiding” as a permanently sustainable model.

  • redwhitedude

    Well China had just undergone a civil war that wound down in 1949. Could it be the USSR under Stalin compelled China to get involved?

  • redwhitedude

    yeah, but that was before TVs.

  • Sumo294

    The old guard are long retired on both the left and the right. The older original liberals were actually as advertised–kind and compassionate persons who were really trying to change the world for the better–their plan went to hell as all their ideas were co-opted by their radical second generation. The conservative old guard were nobly trying to save the world from socialism and communism but neglected to see the dangers of such ideology would invade their own home–that their own sons and daughters would go to college and become the agents of cultural change. They won the war of ideology abroad but lost at home.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Threats. Always with the threats.

  • Bob Bobbs

    I have another viewpoint on what it means to be North American. Canada is the way. America will follow.

  • http://jushinjok.blogspot.com JinJoo

    The captured article I posted above talks about Professor Soh Jin-cheol, who was a researcher specialising in the Korean War, and also an ex-Politics Professor at WonGang University. He received his Ph D from Oklahoma University in 1963. His thesis was “The Real Cause of the Korean War”.

    According to Professor Soh, North Korea, Russia and China are joint war criminals from the Korean War. He said Stalin had planned the war for a long time, Kim Il-sung carried it out faithfully and China stood joint surety.

    Just before the war, during a meeting with Kim Il-sung on the 14th May 1950, Mao Ze-dong told Kim “from now on, the war is our joint task”, thus indicating clearly that China would be one of the countries directly involved with war.

    Before the war started, 50,000 Chinese solders were already deployed along the 38thParallel.

  • http://jushinjok.blogspot.com JinJoo

    There also is a book titled “Chosun (Joseon Jok) Volunteer Army smuggled into North Korea and the Korean War”, written by Kim Joong-seng , who was born in China, and during the Korean war, served in the North Korean People’s Army 6th Division. He obtained Korean citizenship and currently lives in Seoul.

    Before the war started, Kim said, 65,000 Joseon Joks {the Volunteer Army hardcore unit who were highly trained and experienced, having gone through the Chinese Civil War fighting against the Chinese National Party (KuoMinTang) led by Chiang Kai-shek} were smuggled into North Korea and these Joseon Joks were already deployed to the front lines. 47% of the North Korean People’s Army hardcore unit was comprised of JoseonJok.

    As the war developed, China started sending more Joseon-joks, Han Chinese and Manchurians as “cannon fodder”.

    The Korean War itself was, in effect, Mao on the surface pretending to “communize”, when in reality the long-term goal was to “조선화 Chosunize” the peninsula using his henchman, Kim Il-sung.

  • wangkon936

    Uh, I don’t think so. We ain’t gonna be giving up our guns anytime soon.

  • wangkon936

    No threats. Just asking you to be intellectually honest. Link (i.e. rationalize) your contentions. That’s not too much to ask IMHO.

  • http://jushinjok.blogspot.com JinJoo

    Edited….

    Chosunize => re-Chosunize

    The real tragedy of the Korean war was that Koreans were killing one another, instigated by China – the way China has always done for the thousands of years, always playing one against the other.

    According to Mr AHN Cheon, professor of Seoul Education College:

    “Former president ROH is being criticized harshly in history. ROH led a country with a poor governance which rocked the nation at root without making any achievements. The then Roh regime made a diplomatic tie with China on 24.08. 1992 by his short-sighted diplomatic policy. As a result, Korea has lost a lot due to the thoughtless closed-door diplomacy of Roh’s regime. What is the most important is that they failed to consider liquidating the past history in the course leading to the tie. China is a country with sinful past, who used to be most antagonistic to Korea.”

    China is
    a country with sinful past, who used to be most antagonistic to Korea.

    http://blog.naver.com/pilha5/130145495829

  • Bob Bobbs

    My contention is that the right to security of the body is an essential right for all people in a democracy. The video indicates that South Korea pays lip service to this concept but does not take it to heart.

  • Bob Bobbs

    You are entitled to your viewpoint, but, in the words of MLK, “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.” And who says Canadians don’t own guns? http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/facts-faits/index-eng.htm