Hyundai does well in latest JD Power survey of initial quality

The annual JD Power & Associates survey of automotive initial quality places the Hyundai brand 4th, the highest non-luxury brand in the survey.

The rankings are below:

jdp-iqs-survey-1

(Photo from egmcartech.com)

Hyundai’s ranking in initial quality has gone up and down over the last decade, peaking at #4 in 2009, but spiking to has high as #25 the following year (2010).  According to this graph from the JoongAng, Hyundai’s ranking has improved for three year’s straight:

Hyundai scored number one in three product categories: small car (Accent), compact car (Elantra) and midsize premium car (Genesis).  It scored number two in two categories: midsize sedan (Sonata) and midsize SUV (Santa Fe).

Who else did well?  Kia, surprisingly at #7, ahead of BMW and gasp, Honda.  Chevy also did well at #4, welcomed news I’m sure given GM’s tough year of mass recalls and Congressional inquiries of potentially life threatening defects.  Bringing up the rear?  Fiat.  How does a car so small have so many problems?  Yes, I’m sure YangachiBastardo would be proud.

  • redwhitedude

    Wait until the Chinese brands get included. They’ll redefine quality control. Or “Quality control with chinese characteristics”.

  • wangkon936

    I think the Italians will figure out a way to beat them to the bottom.

  • redwhitedude

    But will they beat the Chinese with their dysfunctional legal system especially in the area of consumer protection?

  • RElgin

    Chinese consumer protection is a helmet and a pair of shades.

  • RElgin

    Fiat always had these problems.

    My dad lost his 850 Spyder one day when the throttle cable that was attached to the gas pedal broke. It happened so quickly that he did not have time to throw the car into neutral.
    My brother lost one Fiat X9 when a plastic engine part ruptured and spewed petrol all over the engine, thus starting a little fire.

  • redwhitedude

    No incentive to make cars that actually work well. It’s just a ruse to separate people from their hard earned(or illegally earned) cash. Guess what will happen when this keeps happening? More protests. Chinese with their current political dysfunction are so self defeating.

  • redwhitedude

    Glad I never driven one. I prefer volkswagen over that.

  • dlbarch

    High School. Fiat Spider convertible. “Fix it again, Tony.” Heading over the hill to Santa Cruz every day after class. Getting laid regularly.

    ‘Nuff said.

    DLB

  • wangkon936

    You ever get laid in a Malibu?… 😉

  • dlbarch

    The funny thing is, to this day, my favorite cars are either the ones I had in high school (Fiat, BMW 2002) or the ones I WANTED in high school (Magnum P.I.’s Ferrari 308).

    I think one never fully outgrows the first cars one fell in love with.

    DLB

  • wangkon936

    My first car was a Toyota Corolla… I didn’t love it… hahaha…

  • dlbarch

    Well, my first car in Korea was a 1993 Hyundai Sonata, and I actually DID love that car. In some ways, driving in Korea is a whole lot more fun when one’s NOT worried about getting into a scrape or two.

    Also, it’s fun to watch a Benz yield to you ’cause you just know he cares a whole lot more about his car than you do about yours!

    DLB

  • A Korean

    That’s what they said (and some/many still say) about Korean cars not too long ago.

  • wangkon936

    Yeah, but it took Koreans decades to get to the level of the Japanese. Arguably, even today, they are still not there.

    I visited a VW plant in Shanghai a couple of years ago. There’s a lot they still need to learn. I’m not worried.

  • A Korean

    Worried? Neither were the Japanese and Americans. And China has big enough a domestic market to subsidize their export for a long time.

  • A Korean

    Actually, the point wasn’t that Hyundai needs to watch its back, but the irony of Koreans gloating at Chinese for gizmo quality.

  • redwhitedude

    True, but China and Korea are politically very different. Proper enforcement of safety regulation, quality control, and consumer protection is a significant factor in quality improvement. China is a country who’s legal system tends to get hijacked by the Chinese Communist Party so it remains to be seen whether they will follow Japan and Korea or they will flop around and leave Chinese wondering why they can’t get anywhere 20 years down the road.

  • redwhitedude

    Can the average Chinese afford a car as it stands now?

  • redwhitedude

    Honda civic and didn’t love it either.

  • wangkon936

    But… that car did get me a lot of action… not because it was a cool car but because I was in college and there were just a lot more opportunities. I got more action in that car then in my BMW.

  • redwhitedude

    As long as it is reliable, that’s all I care.

  • redwhitedude

    Japanese used to do that on Koreans.

  • A Korean

    You know that’s a dumb thing to say.

  • A Korean

    I hope you grok that whether Chinese will catch up is besides the point.

  • redwhitedude

    Well they used to be dismissive of Samsung back in the 80s when Lee Kun Hee took over from his father. Back then Korean products were considered cheap junk.

  • redwhitedude

    Maybe things will turn out different but I think it is safe to say that as the Chinese economy develops more and it becomes more sophisticated, politically it has to adapt. The problem is that the CCP want’s the political system to stay static just like it is now with them having monopoly in power. Will they be able to accomplish both things? I don’t think it is far fetched to say that foreign observers tend to be skeptical.

  • RElgin

    The Chinese are hot on stealing anything they can get. What is sad is how many Korean technicians or businessmen will sell out.

  • wangkon936
  • redwhitedude

    True. Just like Koreans did to Japan and the Japanese were complicit in it. The same probably goes with Japan back in the 50s and 60s doing to US and Americans being complicit in it. But the real concern how China will go about it from now on. Will they follow a similar path as Korea and Japan or will it hit a wall or even crash and burn with the political system they have now. Another thing that is different in Chinese case their designation of “strategic” industries but unlike Korea and Japan which tended to coerce private enterprise to do what the government wanted these businesses to do China has state owned enterprises which a lot of them are suspected of being inefficient and in the red. The government is an even more direct player in the economy. They seem to cherry pick aspects of state guided capitalism which is how Korea and Japan developed. Korea paid a price when state covered for these chaebols to assume really high debt in exchange for doing what the state wanted back in the 60s and 70s, i.e. the 1997 crisis. Chinese conveniently ignore that.

  • redwhitedude

    Good articles. But remember if China graduates an ever increasing number of PhD and there is competition for tenured position in universities and research positions but they perceive the hiring process to be say riddled with nespotism and bribery and all other garbage all these people will take their brains and go somewhere else. Not claiming that I know that is how exactly things are in China but given the sort of abuse of positions that I hear about in China and the weakness in rule of law it doesn’t take much to run into such problems. Hopefully they will clean up but I’m not sure if they will.

  • wangkon936

    But… the Chinese currently have one huge handicap. They are a one party system that doesn’t have a system that maximizes people’s capitalists and competitive motivations to create true world beating companies.

  • redwhitedude

    That guarantee of power adversely affects everything. They don’t have to clean up because they don’t have to subject themselves to the voting and risk losing power. All those anticorruption drives all it amounts to is just purging drives to get rid of people they want out. This also means that they don’t either don’t have proper legislation and/or enforcement of things such as IP.
    Note also what they are claiming in corruption, the CCP claims they can do it themselves but if somebody else points out a corruption the CCP feels threatened and put the person who raised the issue away for a few years.
    This leads to little incentive to change and possibly adapt.

  • redwhitedude

    Here’s an example of shipbuilding. It includes comments about the Chinese shipbuilding.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCAGvZEVvkI

  • redwhitedude

    Also their one party system is somewhat paranoid. They want to keep tabs on everything. This can lead to excessive red tape and very intrusive law enforcement. There is certain level of paranoia about something that is independent from the central government. This might discourage entrepreneurial attitudes.

  • wangkon936

    Shipbuilding is a prime example. The Chinese haven’t caught up to the Koreans and won’t be able to for the foreseeable future. Part of it has to do with a Chinese government that’s too slow to react and disincentivized for reform.

  • redwhitedude

    Sounds like bureaucrats running the show instead of business people, this is probably the way state owned enterprises are run. Listening to the dictates of the state instead of looking at the market it is suppose to cater.