Crap I read: June 18, 2014

So much for heightened safety vigilance

The JoongAng Ilbo inspects Korean safety standards, and they’re not impressed with what they see:

It’s been two months since the Sewol ferry sunk in waters off Jindo, South Jeolla, claiming the lives of nearly 300 victims. But Koreans have already returned to their slipshod ways, forgetting the bitter lesson that negligence of safety can lead to tragedy.

This includes lax safety procedures on Korea’s ferries, including insufficient attention paid to safety instructions, poor lifeboat maintenance, passengers smoking where they shouldn’t be, people blocking exits, etc. Hongdae clubs, too, are reportedly firetraps.

Working holiday/sex trade link?

The Korea Times reports that the Japanese embassy is turning down working holiday applications for women aged 26 or over:

The Japanese Embassy rejected all applications from Korean women age 26 or older for working holiday visas this year in an apparent bid to fight prostitution, sources said Sunday.

The measure follows reports that Korean women have misused such visas to work as prostitutes in Japan.
[…]
“Women age 26 or older all failed to obtain a working holiday visa. There was no exception. All 100 percent failed. Many applied for the visa again and again, but we have to say that the acceptance rate is zero. It seems the age cutoff wasn’t so strict for men,” said an employee of Go Japan, an agency arranging working holidays and student visas on her blog.

Hard to tell what’s true and what’s BS here. The Japanese embassy, for its part, is denying such a policy is in place.

Architects are a funny bunch. Even in North Korea

If you haven’t seen it yet, check out the designs North Korean architects came up with when they were told to “go crazy.” The paintings are currently on display in the (award winning!) Korean Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale.

Your tax money at work

That Four Rivers project just gets better and better.

He’s right. Even if it shouldn’t be coming from him.

Even more evidence that irony is dead:

The rumor arose following Rep. Suh Chung-won’s suggestion earlier in the day that Moon Chang-keuk needed to step down, adding to pressure on the controversial ex-journalist.

“After looking at Moon’s actions since his nomination and listening to public opinion, I think Moon needs to read the people’s will regarding his words and actions,” Suh said.
[…]
“(Moon) should engage in serious self-examination. Then (Moon) needs to carefully judge what way (is best) for the people.”

He’s not wrong—Moon’s out there, and recent remarks he made at a lecture at SNU, in which he suggested the recent gay pride parade in Sinchon was intended to “ruin the country,” do not inspire confidence. Still, I suppose it would have been nice to hear this advice from a guy who didn’t do two stints in the pen.

I will say in Moon’s defense that a column he wrote in 2008 that he’s now taking flack for, in which he criticized the Roh administration for exaggerating the Japanese threat to Dokdo, where there was no realistic threat, while saying nothing about the much more real North Korean threat to the NLL, was probably spot on. I’d also say, however, that if Japan’s Sankei Shimbun likes you, you’re probably the wrong man for the job.

  • wangkon936

    Too much money and demand in Japan. Too much of a enforcement push in Korea.

  • platethief
  • Ajoshi123

    I see whores and room salons all over the place here in Korea. Not much of an enforcement push, in fact last night some of the workers in my company were enjoying the seedier delights Korea has to offer, even though they are married with children.

    I feel sorry for the women, their lives must be pretty shitty here in Korea if they have to leave their homeland to sell their snatch.

  • Ajoshi123

    Not really a big surprise.

  • flyingsword

    Of course nothing changed in Korea….look at them drive. They have no sense of safety at all. Getting it done the fastest, cheapest, easiest way is what is all about. That attitude will not change overnight….if ever.

  • flyingsword

    Enforcement?!?! In Korea?!?! Where & When? Besides the week long “enforcement campaigns” every 2 or 3 years there is not much in the way of enforcement…of any law. From driving, to prostitution, to ferry boat safety. One or two high profile events a year does not enforcement make.

  • codfilet

    Less chance of running into someone they know in Japan.

  • pawikirogii

    did you get a fork? how long you live in korea? you know, many bitter expats stay in korea for the prostitutes. you one of them?

  • pawikirogii

    and you? fork?

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    So he is bitter because he is telling it like it is? Sewol is now ancient memory. Whats the next big scandal?

  • pawikirogii

    yeah, he’s using a tragedy to score points. that’s a sure sign. he got one fork too many. next!

  • pawikirogii

    ps he seems to be well versed in korean prostitution keeping track of crackdowns and all. we all know why.

  • pawikirogii
  • SalarymaninSeoul

    He’s not scoring points, he is telling the truth. You are more outraged about this than about the fact that no lessons from Sewol were learned?

  • brier

    I don’t like the four rivers project. Wish they would keep the rivers and streams in their natural state. But let’s not forget the original precursor to this project. The dredging, damning and embankment of the Han River through Seoul. Yup, sandbars gone, wetlands gone. The damning of the Han through Seoul turns it more into a long finger lake than a river that flows. Nobody says return the Han to its natural state through Seoul. The Four Rivers project is a bad idea, and I imagine all you got to do is follow the money.

  • unplanned_life

    Japan’s form of QC, just wants to ensure its prostitutes are under 26.

  • Aja Aja

    Regarding the lack of public safety culture..

    So, if something bad happens again, the public will blame the government, the police, the coast guards, the divers, and everyone else except themselves. They should really look in the mirrors, safety starts with each individuals. Respect the rules and regulations, and demand the government and the law enforcements to do something when you see violations by businesses. Yet the same people who were blaming the Sewol on the coast guards are probably the same people who violates everyday safety rules and who ignore and break the rules. Then they expect the government to be the super natural powers that prevent tragedies, only when it happens and it’s too late.

  • redwhitedude

    Then they’ll swing to the other side, which is finding every excuse to fine airlines. Hey you gotta make money somehow.

  • redwhitedude

    It’s going to be painfully slow. Should see what it was like in the 80s. Cabbies where F1 drivers with short fuses.

  • redwhitedude

    But but that is “protectionism”. 😀

  • redwhitedude

    He’s just flashing the angry expat brigade membership card.

  • redwhitedude

    But doesn’t it make you wonder where all these prostitutes come from? Teen runaways, trafficked women, women who fell into debt trap and got the short end of loan sharks and so forth. I think the authorities not only are they lax but they don’t have a clue on how to deal with such problems. It seems that there is tremendous ignorance in this problem and in sex ed or lack of it. Just telling people “don’t do it because it is illegal” isn’t going to cut it.

  • wangkon936

    Nah, I think it’s because of the money. Japan has its economic problems, but it’s still the 3rd largest economy in the world.

  • wangkon936

    Sometimes it’s simpler then that. Women who fall into debt. Women who want nice purses and $$$ for plastic surgery. My buddy told me that this one girl he knew was into it because she started a clothing boutique store and it went belly up and she had a lot of debts she owed.

  • wangkon936

    Things do change in Korea. However, for many expats time revolves around the one year contract, so time progression is a bit truncated.

  • wangkon936

    Balderdash… Japanese like ’em young.

    http://www.public.iastate.edu/~rhetoric/105H17/nnguyen/cof.html

  • djson1

    Yeah, when I read that, I was thinking…so, under 26 is OK?

  • wangkon936

    The ban for women “under” 26 so that would mean that the older ones wouldn’t be subject to the ban.

  • djson1

    But actually, aside from his cheap-shot comment about ferry boat safety, I have to agree that enforcement is not as strong as it could be with the red light districts (and prostitution in general) and driving. Although, I will say enforcement has gotten A LOT better than from 10+ years ago. It’s a gradual process.

  • djson1

    At the risk of sounding like a perv, I know that in the late ’80s and early ’90s red light districts like Mia-ri and Chongryangri were huge and covered several blocks. I would imagine with all the recent redevelopment and law enforcement, those places are pretty much gone now, right? My point being that enforcement has taken some effect. BTW, You can always answer this with the initial disclaimer: “From what I read/heard….”

  • redwhitedude

    There was an article a while back about a Korean woman who ended up in California in debt servitude.

  • wangkon936

    Methinks this “Ajoshi123″ thinks in terms of one year contracts or five years tops. Thus, his idea of improvement is only under those auspices.

    What I have been hearing is that their’s been steady pressure to curb prostitution in Korea. Not sure if it’s had an effect on absolute numbers yet but it’s certainly had an effect on marketing, distribution and supply.

  • redwhitedude

    Yup I think there is more money to be made in Japan. Also Japan is only one of only two countries that hasn’t outright banned child porn. That may change soon but still the fact that they let this kind of thing legally go for so long is not a good reflection.

  • redwhitedude

    I think it also involves changing people’s attitudes towards it too. Not sure how successful that is.

  • redwhitedude

    Plus they don’t know where Korea is coming from. They just see Korea in a 1 year snap shot. If you wanted to get an accurate picture they would have to stay in Korea for a long time. Such as a 5-10 year window should suffice.

  • redwhitedude

    Disturbing when you consider Japan hasn’t even banned child porn yet. Apparently the explanation is “child modeling”. I think Russia is the other country that has that legal hole.

  • wangkon936

    Well, there are those that comment here that claim to have lived in Korea for 17 plus years.

  • wangkon936
  • wangkon936

    I think he’s USFK and… he likes jumping screen names. Seems to be collecting them like shoes or cars. Mr. WhoEverYouAre. Pick one and stick with it. Gracias.

  • dlbarch

    Korea is an exponentially better place now than it was 20 years ago, and even then, it was never that bad.

    I have great memories of Korea dating back to 1987, when I was a total know-nothing F.O.B. coming from Japan. That shouldn’t keep one from offering insight and criticism where it’s warranted, but the endless expat complaint that “Korea sucks” is just wrong.

    On the other hand, I have no desire to return. I think Korea is a young man’s came…awesome in one’s 20s, a bit sad in one’s 40s.

    But, yeah, overall a pretty impressive place.

    DLB

  • wangkon936

    I think it’s because of the urban crawl. It might not be too bad for you if you had a nice condo by the sea in Jeju and a sailboat.

  • redwhitedude

    It also depends on how observant they are. Living in a country isn’t necessarily a guarantee that they’ll understand the country. It’s hard to tell online.

  • wangkon936

    One thing about Korea is that these “establishments” tend to be concentrated in certain districts known for these activities. One can see a lot of “free lancer” women walk the streets of these districts looking for some “overflow” business. They are typically the only young women that walk the streets of these districts. So, that brings up a natural question. If you see these places “all the time” where the heck do you live?

  • redwhitedude

    More like senile porn. lol

  • wangkon936

    It’s not as common as you think. The person in question has like five different screen names where he approaches his gripes from slightly different angles. We are aware of the switching. I don’t approve, but I don’t make the decisions here. I’m sure if he becomes annoying enough he’ll get moderated.

  • dlbarch

    Word!

    DLB

  • wangkon936

    I know you bro…. 😉

  • redwhitedude

    I remember in the early 80s they had issues with gangs such as kidnappings. There was an instance of a gang snatching a woman by staging it as if there were shooting a movie, it was in the early 80s but that was when issues with such crimes were on the decline already. If you go back further cops were nothing more than thugs in police uniform. There is a dutch photographer that traveled around asia around 50s, 60s, and 70s. I asked him why there weren’t any movie clips of Korea back in the 50s and 60s and he told me back then Korea was not considered safe hence he didn’t go there. He had clips of Japan, Hong Kong and other places but not Korea.

  • redwhitedude

    I don’t get those people. I use only one username.

  • pawikirogii

    i don’t think korea will ever rid itself of prostitution. when i was young, i thought the sex industry there was due to economics and assumed it would disappear when korea became wealthy. i’ve since realized that that ain’t gonna happen as prostitution seems to be a part of korea’s modern day culture. i don’t like prostituion but on the grand scheme of things, korea has much more pressing issues.

  • redwhitedude

    Here we go with “culture”. It’s more about attitudes. But to be fair nobody has gotten rid of it. It’s about enforcement. In the US you hear about people getting busted for prostitution here and there.

  • pawikirogii

    it’s valid to point out korea’s lack of a safety culture but when i consider such things, i always think about the larger picture. korea has moved into the first world. it can’t and isn’t as bad as the expat likes to paint it. the real problem for korea with regards to things like ferry disasters, fake nuclear parts, ect is that the world now looks at korea much closer than it ever did before. sooner or later, if these lax safety regulations and disasters caused by inattention to detail continue, people might start to question the products koreans make. that’s something koreans should think about.

  • pawikirogii

    right and at this time, korea doesn’t seem interested in changing their attitudes towards the sex industry. that doesn’t mean it will never happen but i don’t see it happening for a long time.

  • wangkon936

    I guess people want more power and more say so then God has given them via natural ability.

  • wangkon936

    If the goal is getting “rid… of prostitution” then that won’t be accomplished anywhere. It’s been around and will continue to be around anywhere in the world. So, one needs to think about reduction, not elimination. Reduction is a worthy and attainable goal. If you give women more career options than 1) marriage or 2) elite college education then you will see less prostitution IMHO. Remember, there are still relatively few good career opportunities for younger women who don’t graduate from SKY universities in Korea, despite the higher overall GDP in Korea. Economics for young women in Korea haven’t really changed that much from 10 or even 20 years ago. Japan has similar problems, even now.

  • redwhitedude

    Going on the topic of education. The problem with education in Korea is that it is being used to socially stratify. You’ve got SKY grads and then everybody else. Quite unlike the US in which you could have somebody who is a ivy grad working along side somebody who is successful despite graduating from a lesser school. Frankly I think Korean mentality in education needs to change. Their attitude is not “democratic”. It’s more about what you do after than what school you went. This stratification is a carryover from the Joseon period where you have people rising to Yangban because they had access to education unlike the rest of the people.

  • Bob Bobbs

    No, OVER 26 = no visa. Or so they say.

    “The Japanese Embassy rejected all applications from Korean women age 26 or older…” – See more at:
    http://www.rjkoehler.com/2014/06/18/crap-i-read-june-18-2014/#disqus_thread

  • Bob Bobbs

    Uh. Try again. A lot of my buddies are approaching 20 years ‘in country.’

  • Bob Bobbs

    Those with sufficient numbers of years in Korea are still shouted down.

  • flyingsword

    16 years here….

  • flyingsword

    We never said Korea ‘sucked'; just that they have no sense of safety….

  • flyingsword

    ????

  • redwhitedude

    It becomes apparent who has more experience in Korea.

  • Sumo294

    Basically women have a commodity men want–youth and fertility and men have excess labor and productivity to barter with that is why no country, culture or nation have ever gotten rid of it.

  • redwhitedude

    What about unwanted pregnancies? lol

  • Sumo294

    I understand your point–but its complicated. Here is something to consider–some women actually choose to be prostitutes out of free will. They are educated and come from wealthy families but do it for the lifestyle and while they most certainly are part of the business they consider themselves to be entertainers. My understanding is that most women in the profession do not see themselves as being a prostitute despite what society thinks.

  • wangkon936

    Pharmaceutical technology and otherwise has greatly reduced that issue.

  • wangkon936

    Well, then. You must be a general by now. At least a full-bird colonel, no?

  • Ajoshi123

    11 here.

    To be honest not much has change in regards to safety, still bikes ride on the sidewalk and still people don’t wear helmets or put seat-belts on their kids.

    With regards to whores and room-salons, if anything there are more room-salons and other 안마 places in most major dongs then I remember when I first came here.

  • redwhitedude

    Wait until somebody has a horrible accident. It will force them to act. Still has a long way to go.

    As to room-salons and massage places, hard to say maybe there were places of prostitution that are more than ever trying to mask themselves as such. Maybe the overall number of places of prostitution is the same or there is an actual increase. Perhaps they are relocating to different places and such. Hard to say.

  • wangkon936

    안마s may have diffused a bit more into the gu (구) because there have been attempts to crack down on the larger red light districts. Those efforts wax and wane, but pushing prostitution to the gus have been a consequence. Any ways, texted my 32 year old unmarried cousin on Kakao just now and they are not really prevalent in his particular dong (somewhere in Gangseo-gu). However, the districts (Gangseo, Bucheon, Gangnam, etc.) may each have their own 안마, but each individual dongs (동, neighborhoods) generally won’t.

  • wangkon936

    Why do you stay in a country for so long if you hate it? It would seem to defy logic, no?

  • BSDetector

    “passengers smoking where they shouldn’t be”
    Yeah there’s a serious safety concern. -_-

  • wangkon936

    ????. See, this is EXACTLY what I’m talking about!

  • wangkon936

    Well, okay then. Maybe it is a QC issue after all.

  • BSDetector

    Huh? It’s Thursday and I’m wanting it to be Friday so I’m operating at 2/3 brain efficiency and 1/10 care capacity. Expand, clarify, enlighten, entertain…

  • wangkon936
  • BSDetector

    Why? He’s complaining about driving and hookers. I’m thinking that on the list of things in regards to enhancing safety that rogue smokers should even be mentioned at this point.

    Or is this about your comment that he’s hoping screen names? If so then it’s probably because anyone posting on `the Hole from a USFK system is doing so behind a giant tax-payer funded proxy so we’re probably showing as coming from the same source address. I thought you’ve been here a while and would’ve known that. -_O

  • http://www.rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    I always figured that what it was.

  • Ajoshi123

    I think there a quite a few more than before, the number of room-salons, norebangs and other adult entertainment are more numerous than I remember. There is never one far from wherever our company takes our customers.

    The granny snatch is a new phenomena though.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-27189951

    Very sad when so many people in a country have to sell themselves.

  • BSDetector

    Think of it this way, I’m pretty sure you guys were here back in 2003 when it was even worse but the internet is like Hooker Hill, a proxy is a condom and your computer…

    …well I don’t need to continue right? 😉

    The lesson is don’t take your computer to Hooker Hill. I think… is it Friday yet?

  • wangkon936

    That might explain why my cousin says there’s no 안마s in his dong. It’s a residential heavy, not a business heavy dong.

  • wangkon936

    “Very sad when so many people in a country have to sell themselves.”

    Then go home. What’s stopping you?

  • wangkon936

    Room salons aren’t always places of prostitution. Some are, but many are not.

  • pawikirogii

    perhaps for the prostitution. he seems to be well versed in it.
    and yes, he should go back to wherever he came from.

  • pawikirogii

    ‘It’s not as common as you think. The person in question has like five
    different screen names where he approaches his gripes from slightly
    different angles. We are aware of the switching. I don’t approve, but I
    don’t make the decisions here. I’m sure if he becomes annoying enough
    he’ll get moderated.’ wangkon in reference to ‘flying swords’

    I KNEW IT. he’s a high ranking official in the AEB.

  • wangkon936
  • Ajoshi123

    So, if I comment that parts of society here are sad I should go home? That a pretty pathetic argument. ]

    Where do you live? If not in Korea you shouldn’t even be commentating.

  • Ajoshi123

    I’ve never slept with a prostitute or even been to anything more than a singing room here. There prevalence here is obvious enough though.

    I think that is sad that so many women have to sell themselves, especially old ladies who should be treated well by a society that supposedly respects its elderly.

    But hey, what do I know?

    As for the go back comment, are you so thin skinned that you feel that anyone who questions the problems in Korean culture and society should just go home? You feel that insecure when people question things you want them to leave you to your closed minded view?

    There are some pretty amazing people and places in this county, but there are a hell of a lot more things that are wrong and need fixing. I’m not going to ignore the problems I see around me, you seem to want everyone to wear tinted glasses or just say “well that happens in the USA too.” We’re not in the USA, we are in Korea, things need changing here, Koreans don’t seem overly keen on bothering to fix things. At least commenting about problems is better than burying your head in the sand.

  • pawikirogii

    he’s still high ranking.

  • pawikirogii

    honestly, i tire of the endless advice from expats. korea is doing just fine, sir.

  • bumfromkorea

    It’s a knee jerk reaction, fostered by the disturbingly large number of expats who sees Korean society as problems rather than seeing problems with Korean society. While both types criticize Korea, the former ends up saying things like “Korean culture of…” “Koreans always…”, “A typical Korean…” etc. (some of the less subtle ones just go to town on these “Klowns”)

    Unfortunately for all of us, there have been a recent increase in such assclowns’ presence in this blog’s comment section. So I’d imagine the community here is a bit touchy. Only now do I realize the importance of websites like Expathell – I’m sure the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Depository isn’t exactly a pleasant place to visit either, but it sure as hell is necessary.

    I get what you’re saying, dude. And I’d imagine you’re not saying anything different than what many Koreans are bitching about their own society (particularly the younger generation). But, as always, it’s that one (or in this case, 4 to 5) 미꾸라지 that muddles up the entire pond.

  • bumfromkorea

    I would hate to give this moron more traffic, but the first paragraph of this post is such a revealing insight into what these types are like. I believe this particular idiot didn’t even realize what his own writing would mean.

    http://klownisms.wordpress.com/2014/05/29/we-dont-need-no-water-let-the-motherfucker-burn/

    Dude thinks he’s in a gulag for 8 years. No wonder he hates these fucking “Klowns”. I’m just disturbed by the number of Koreans this psycho comes into daily contact with.

  • bumfromkorea

    addendum: He or she would also need to at least try to adapt to their new home, and at least try to learn the local language. If you spent so much time in a country and you still can’t even glean basic meaning off of a simple sentence in the local language, then that’s a good sign that you’ve been playing clueless tourist for all those years.

  • pawikirogii

    to save people time, klown says he’s in korea for money. he says he makes about 7 million won (7k usd) a month. he says he has no hobbies outside of animus. in other words, he’s in korea to leach. i think we should forget about this klown. let him stew while we enjoy our rotten fetid kimchi. it’s so damn gooooood!

  • RElgin

    This project is the hallmark of LMB’s administration and its problems with planning anything on a governmental scale without corruption, misdirection, ineptitude. His tenure is marked by the canal fever speculation craze that swept Korea as well. This is what happens when a middle-management type gets elected instead of retiring.

  • http://www.bcarr.com/ Brendon Carr

    So, in addition to all your other ignorance about Korea, you are unaware that “dong” is a subdivision of a “gu”?

  • redwhitedude

    But can you really tell them apart all the time?

  • A Korean

    Like jesus said, know where your dong is.

  • wangkon936

    Hahaha… Brendon. I know 동 is a subdivision of 구.

    My point is this: since a 구 is larger than a 동, and may contain 동s of different flavors (i.e. residential, business, entertainment, etc.) a 구 is more likely to have a 안마 than a 동.

  • http://www.bcarr.com/ Brendon Carr

    Why don’t you try out some dongs and let us know about the flavors?

  • wangkon936

    Well yeah. A room salon advertises itself as a room salon, not as a brothel. They are legal, that is if they stick strictly to their legally defined parameters. You go in a room salon, you sing, chat, drink, dance with girls, give a little squeeze, etc.

    It’s how Korean men unwind kinda like how American men unwind at strip bars. Both are legal entities but still considered vices in their respective cultures. Now, there are some room salons that offer after hour services. You talk to the madame using code (i.e. “can I take this one home with me,” etc.) upon which you will know if this particular room salon will offer the after hours services. Kinda like how some strip bars in the states will also offer “additional” services in a private room after talking to the proprietor in “speak-easy” type code. However, like the state, not all room salons or strip bars will offer these “additional” or “after hours” services.

    Now, there are the “full service” room salons that will not only offer the standard “companionship” services but also a litany of sexual (and apparently illegal) services also. Not sure how common those are, but I believe they are rarer than the standard room salons. A couple of well moneyed Korean American friends I knew did actively try to find these “full-service” room salons in Gangnam. Couldn’t find them.

  • redwhitedude

    Isn’t there something similar with certain bath houses?

  • wangkon936

    “I realize the importance of websites like Expathell – I’m sure the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Depository isn’t exactly a pleasant place to visit either, but it sure as hell is necessary.”

    Hilarious! There’s also the toilet analogy. It an’t pretty, but it’s necessary.

    For the record, I like Expathell. It had the usual negative tripe but at least it wasn’t just constant droning of complaints. It was funny, original and creative. I liked his series where he pretends that he’s interviewing an ajosshi. It’s hilarious and there is a surprising amount of truth in it.

    At the end of the day, expats who choose to express their experience of Korea in such a sarcastic and negative manner shouldn’t act so surprised that they have attracted the ire of netizens and citizens in the real world. They shouldn’t complain about it either. I think they know this to some degree as well such they do choose to be anonymous in the vast number of situations.

    I mean think about it. Turn it around. What if a large number of expatriates from a country that has a higher per capita GDP such as Sweden, Australia, Canada (yes, Canada has a higher per capita GDP than the U.S.), Denmark, etc. came to the U.S., and usually not the best and brightest from these countries, but the average bloke/joe schmo came and just started unloading the same kinds of sarcastic and negative tripe? I mean, turn it around. Walk a mile in another man’s moccasins. There is plenty to make fun of and criticize in America if one really wanted to. The proliferation of guns, a militarized society, a chronically overweight society, crappy mass produced food, stone age healthcare system, stratified races, disparity between rich and poor, a society that incarcerates a huge percentage of its male population (and 25% of its male African American population), a deadlocked political system that can’t even pass a budget on time, etc. The list goes on and on. Again, if you really wanted to, there’s just so much material you can be negative all day for weeks. Again, if you chose to.

    Any ways, you don’t think American netizens wouldn’t react the same way if a large group of such people did the same thing? Oh, you bet they will. Because Americans are a proud people, who have built up a pretty damn good country, despite it’s flaws and who, incidentally, also think their way is the best way. Sound familiar? Of course it does.

  • wangkon936

    Maybe. I dunno.

  • wangkon936

    An expat girl from Minnesota said the best thing about this crowd:

    “Before teaching in Korea I read A LOT of negative comments on places such as Dave’s ESL…. A wise person once told me that those who complain on Dave’s are people who are bored and lonely, sitting in their tiny Korean apartments instead of going out there and LIVING your life in Korea to its potential. . My advice to those thinking of traveling to Korea is: GO! Research your school the best that you can – but just take a leap. The worst thing that can happen is you have to scrape some money together to fly home.”

    From here: http://katieskoreanadventure.blogspot.com/

  • wangkon936

    Sir, we are both men who are firmly of an “adult” age. Let’s act like it. Thank you.

  • wangkon936

    I would say that the 3rd largest commenting body here are people who use to live and work in Korea and now don’t.

  • redwhitedude

    He probably didn’t do his homework when looking for rental places.

  • redwhitedude
  • bumfromkorea

    Well, they would probably go to this reaction :http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fZZqDJXOVg

    For me, it’s not even Korea vs. Expats who are whiny issue. It’s one immigrant saying to another – Sack. The. Fuck. Up.

    There’s a distinct difference between the critical comments from people who clearly adjusted and the critical comments from people who clearly hate themselves, their surroundings, and the host country. One trend seems to be that the former complains about the problems in Korea, and the latter bitches about the “Korean problem”.

  • http://www.bcarr.com/ Brendon Carr

    When you leave it teed up so perfectly? Come on.

  • wangkon936

    Sometimes I just think you’re bored.

  • Ajoshi123

    Korea is doing just fine?

    I’m sure I don’t have to explain to you the recent disasters that that happened here, but to say Korea is “doing just fine” when the level of public saftey is so low, traffic accidents and pedestrian deaths are so high and old ladies have to sell their bodies just to make a living, is retarded.

    If you think that is doing fine, I suggest you cut down on the soju.

  • RElgin

    Yes but what about the 딩동 ‘s?

  • RElgin

    Per safety vigilance, a Korean I know well reported an older concrete wall that borders a road because it is deteriorating and is bulging out over the road. If it collapses, it could easily kill anyone beneath it.
    They reported this to Gwanak-gu. a week or so later, the Gu Office responded by email that they had notified the owner about the wall.

    No action was taken, the owner was not required to fix the wall or given a deadline. The Gu only let the fellow know that they had done something, even though nothing was accomplished.

    This is why the JoongAng Ilbo has not been impressed with how the government, at all levels, deals with public safety issues – as in so many places, bureaucracy is heavier than gravity.

  • dlbarch

    Hey, if Jeju National University needs a visiting lecturer in American jurisprudence for a couple of semesters, then sign me up.

    DLB

  • redwhitedude

    I doubt even going “home” would make a difference. Even in the US you hear of people getting busted here and there over this. In fact this happens in any country people selling themselves.

  • redwhitedude

    But but adults can go senile.

  • redwhitedude

    Isn’t it funny how countries blame the other for prostitution? I mean what about their nationals happily collaborating in trafficking women?

  • Bob Bobbs

    Because they don’t want to go back to Moose Jaw. I dunno. Ask them.

  • Bob Bobbs

    If you are in a dong, you are also in a gu. Yes, some dongs may not have anmas. There is probably not a single gu that does not have any.