Trailer for “Battle of Myeongryang- Roaring Currents”

Speaking of movie trailers, for you fans of Admiral Yi Sun-sin there is a new movie coming out that portrays probably his most famous battle where, the story goes, he successfully fought off 330 Japanese ships with just 12 or 13 of his own.

Battle of Myeongryang- Roaring Currents,” is starring Choi Min-Sik, probably one of Korea’s most internationally well known actors.  It will be interesting to see how he portrays Admiral Yi, given his history of portraying such dark characters.  Another interesting thing is that at least some of the storyline and aesthetics will be based on the American comic book “Yi Soon Shin: Warrior and Defender.”

  • redwhitedude

    Looks very interesting and more lavish than the portrayal of the battle than that Immortal Yi SunShin.

  • Aja Aja

    Looks and sounds like a fantastic movie. I hope the acting and the script is just as good as the trailer. Who plays the Japanese Samurai’s?

  • wangkon936

    At 0.42, Japanese sekibune ship explodes upon impact with just one cannon ball! Michael Bay would be proud!

  • wangkon936

    Well, Immortal Yi Sun-shin was filmed on a TV budget, after all.

  • Aja Aja

    Could have been an ammo supplying ship, full of explosives taking a direct hit.

  • Aja Aja

    2005 KBS Drama, it was pretty good, in which the comic book is based on.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=si04ZNjma4M

  • Aja Aja

    I think this movie portrayal of true leadership is what is needed in Korea right now. This is a good timing for this movie.

  • wangkon936

    Maybe… but still looks like it’s from Michael Bay’s school of action exaggeration.

    Check out Grimlock exploding just from being hit by Optimus Prime’s shield!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8HPIH5JCak#t=136

  • wangkon936

    True.

  • djson1

    I can’t wait for this to come out on DVD or blu-ray. It looks pretty good. I hope the CGI is realistic.

  • djson1

    I bought this DVD set in 2006 and still haven’t watched it. Procrastination at its best.

  • Aja Aja

    Are you a history buff? What’s Japanese version of the Imjin Waeran war? I know Toyotomi Hideyoshi is a hero in Japan, as the person who united Japan. I imagine to the Japanese, Yi Sun Shin is just an unknown and they probably think Japan won that war after Hideyoshi generously accepted peace from the defeated Chosun kingdom. Either that, or they don’t mention the war or the Japanese defeats in their text books. Just my guess.

  • wangkon936

    djson1,

    Look at 0.19. There you are seeing Korean actor 류승룡 speaking Japanese with Korean subtitles. 류 also spoke Manchu (with Korean subtitles) in the movie “War of the Arrows.”

  • Aja Aja

    In the trailer scenes, they were speaking Japanese. I wonder who the actors are. In the 2005 KBS drama, the Japanese were Korean actors speaking Korean. The caricatures of the evil Japanese were just over the top. Hopefully this movie doesn’t fall into the same trap.

  • wangkon936

    It is 류승룡. I am kind of assuming he will play a similar character to his portrayal of the Manchu warlord in “War of Arrows.” That’s probably why he got cast as a Japanese character.

  • Aja Aja

    I see. Didn’t recognize him with that costume. Yes, he played that Manchu barbarian in the War of the Arrows.

  • redwhitedude

    Yeah but doesn’t need to movie budget to tell a story effectively.

  • wangkon936

    Speaking Japanese with a pronounced Korean accent. However, not easy to pick up if you don’t have a good ear for either language.

  • redwhitedude

    Time to watch it then.

  • wangkon936

    True.

  • Aja Aja

    I guess it would have been difficult to get real Japanese actors for this movie, especially when the relations between the two countries isn’t good at all.

  • redwhitedude

    You mean Michael Bay’s school of plotless movie making.

  • djson1

    I’ll check it out later since I’m at work, so I couldn’t have the sound on. He spoke Manchu in War of the Arrows (I didn’t watch that)? That’s an obscure language to learn. Are you sure it wasn’t just Mandarin? Even in Chinese movies, I would think people portraying Manchus speak Mandarin. That’s cool if they actually took the time to learn a few authentic Manchu phrases though.

  • Aja Aja

    Nope. It definitely didn’t sound like Chinese Mandarin. If anything, it sounded like American native Indian languages.

  • djson1

    Hey, those Korean-made cannonballs…that’s what they do.

  • redwhitedude

    You can learn manchu at Harvard University unfortunately given the status of the language it is primarily used to read old manchu documents.

  • redwhitedude

    Just saying American indian language is awfully broad.

  • Aja Aja

    Maybe Inuit?

  • redwhitedude

    I think inuit maybe classified as paleosiberian among siberian languages. It’s very different from Tungus. Paleosiberian are languages that don’t fall in other language groups such as turkic, tungus, uralic and mongolic.

  • redwhitedude

    You pretty much have to be a native japanese speaker to tell the difference.

  • redwhitedude

    I don’t consider manchu to be barbarian. However that is the traditional views from Mings and Joseon.

  • wangkon936

    Oh, I’m not so sure about that. The Koreans were able to get a Japanese actor for this movie:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_Lost_Memories

  • djson1

    I asked one of my Japanese friends that question as well (he’s a fairly educated guy too). I think his take was that it was just one of Japan’s earliest international campaigns and they were on their way to kick ass until Hideyoshi had to call people back because he was sick or something like that. And yes, most Japanese didn’t really know about the turtle ships and Admiral Yi. I asked the same to my other Japanese friends and nobody knew of the battles at sea with the turtle ships. Which is probably why if you walked in downtown Tokyo in 2005-2006, the Korea Exchange Bank had this huge mural in their office windows of the turtle ship at sea destroying Japanese ships. Pretty brazen of the KEB folks to put that up on the window along the sidewalk.

  • Aja Aja

    But that was then, over ten years ago. This is now in 2013 when the movie was shot. I think there would have been a public flack in Japan, if any of their actors participated in this movie which could be interpreted as anti-Japanese in nature by the Japanese.

  • wangkon936

    They spoke Manchu in that movie. The movie was set before the Manchu conquest of Ming, so they were still speaking Manchu (rather than Mandarin).

  • redwhitedude

    I’d understand the explosion if the ship happened to be a supply ship loaded with ammo for the matchlocks(gunpowder and so forth).

  • wangkon936

    With lots and lots of explosions!

  • Aja Aja

    ha ha.. that’s what I figured. Of course the KEB was able to do that, since not many Japanese knew the significance of it.

  • redwhitedude

    That’s like asking Brits about the American War of independence. They really don’t dwell on it. Perhaps they see it as just “a bunch of troublesome colonies not worth retaining”.

  • redwhitedude

    It sounds like overbearing Korea “promotion”.

  • wangkon936

    Oh, I can tell… not that I can speak much Japanese, but I did watch a lot of anime when I was a kid/teen.

  • djson1

    Oh, I understand that. But I was basically meaning that all Chinese historical dramas (non-Cantonese movies) speak Beijing style Mandarin regardless of time period. It’s kind of like how Hollywood pretty much portrays every historical movie with actors speaking in English accents.

  • redwhitedude

    Let’s not forget eye candy! Megan Fox. Can’t act.

  • redwhitedude

    Well I guess if you were bombarded with native Japanese you could.

  • wangkon936

    With the exception of Kevin Costner’s “Robin Hood.” It’s hilarious to listen to all the actors with some kind of British accent and Kevin Costner portraying Robin Hood with a Californian/Mid-western American accent.

    I would think that the English would be offended, but you see them play that version of Robin Hood all the time on BBC International.

  • redwhitedude

    Isn’t everybody guilty of linguistic inaccuracies? I doubt in Korean historical dramas people were speaking modern Korean.

  • wangkon936

    Hahaha…. true.

    They were speaking this strange language:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_Ix9SL-vUQ

  • Aja Aja

    Great find. What is the time period of this, and by this time, how much Chinese vocabulary was integrated into the spoken language?

    I think I picked up about 8% of it, the vast majority might as well be Greek.

  • djson1

    Ha! yeah…that’s exactly what annoyed me about that movie (Robin Hood). Most actors can at least pull off a decent British accent…but Costner was way off in that (even his Texas accent in JFK was pretty bad). That also reminds me of Russell Crowe’s Aussie accent in Gladiator (where he was a Spaniard).

  • redwhitedude

    Just think of how badly all Koreans would get whacked for speaking incorrectly by people from that period.

  • Aja Aja

    The guy at the end who translates the 15th century Joseon script into today’s Korean, has a strange pronunciation. I think he has a speech impediment where his tongue is getting dragged along. That would annoy a lot of people.

  • redwhitedude

    It’s awkward. It isn’t natural.

  • wangkon936

    Middle Korean is some wicked shit, ain’t it? But, then again, so is reading Chaucer in the original Middle English:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QE0MtENfOMU

  • wangkon936

    The “strange pronunciation” is an honest attempt to speak Middle Korean in the correct way.

  • pawikirogii

    they spoke manchu in ‘war of arrows’ and please remember that even though there are few manchu speakers, there are about 40k speakers of a language called ‘xibe’. xibe is almost identical to manchu though the people who speak it say they are different from manchu people. manchu/xibe sounds very similar to korean and i’m sure the korean actors had an easy time pronouncing the language. words like 어로탐비 would be so easy for a korean to say. lastly ryu sungnyong is one of my favorite actors. check him out in a fantastic film called ‘masquerade’. and djson, do yourself a favor and watch ‘war of arrows’. very entertaining action film.

  • pawikirogii

    wang, thank you so much for this.

  • pawikirogii

    i too bought the abridged version and thought it was ok but not great. i lent it to a white friend of mine and in one week he returned it. i assumed he didn’t like it because how could he be done with a 30+ hour series within a week? the answer to that is, when you really like what you’re watching. he loved the series and so did his wife. give it a try, djson.

  • redwhitedude

    I was wondering about how many manchus are in china. Statistics in China don’t seem to be terribly reliable, especially since there have been cases faking ids especially to the extent that fake passports coming from China.

  • pawikirogii

    wiki says there are ten million manchus but i’m not sure about any of that. however many manchus there are, not many speak manchu.

  • redwhitedude

    Given the track record that chinese have with stats I wonder how accurate that count is.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    I won a small prize for having the best Southeast Midland Middle English pronunciation in my Chaucer class back in university.

    I wasn’t particularly good with the ladies back then.

  • Sumo294

    Wow–ty for this–this was very interesting.

  • Sumo294

    Even later–Queen Elizabeth on a tour of the kingdom had to use close to twenty translators because the regional dialects rendered the supposedly shared English mutually unintelligible. The St. James Bible, Shakespeare and the dictionaries killed off over 200 dialects–the same way modern Korea has killed off Jeju’s native dialect. For example, the new governor of Jeju cannot even speak the native dialect–which means that speaking the dialect it not necessary to hold local power in Jeju anymore.

  • wangkon936

    I tried reading a few pages of The Canterbury Tales in Middle English. My tongue and throat revolted. I felt like I was strangling.

  • wangkon936

    No worries. There was probably as much dialectical heterogeneity in Korea around the Three Kingdom’s period (6th century AD) probably until middle Koryo (11th century AD). Jeju is just a well preserved example.

  • http://www.bcarr.com/ Brendon Carr

    This is your best comment ever.

  • silver surfer

    Looks like a comic book version. Figures.

  • silver surfer

    But we still know it happened.

    If you ask us about the history of the English in Ireland, otoh, we generally have no idea.

  • silver surfer

    Do your white friends know you hate them?

  • silver surfer

    The 15th century version sounds more Chinese, and the modern version sounds more Japanese.

  • Sumo294

    I have given thought to your phrase “dialectical heterogenity” in describing languages and I conclude it is accurate. Tyvm for teaching me something–it makes life interesting.

  • Sumo294

    What about a Korean -Japanese–such a person would be fluent in Japanese.

  • pawikirogii

    do your korean friends know you hate them?

  • pawikirogii

    that is, if you have any friends.

  • redwhitedude

    But probably not to the level of detail as the Americans.

  • wangkon936

    I would say that the 15th century version sounded more Manchu. The Manchus actually had a lot of influence on the formation of Mandarin, the lingua franca of today’s China. Before the Manchu conquest the lingua franca of Ming China had 7 or 8 tones. After the Manchu conquest, the court language of China was reduced to 5 tones and that language eventually became Mandarin.

  • djson1

    Great insights, Pawi. BTW…I just remembered: I actually have the War of Arrows blu-ray and just never watched it. haha. Time to watch it this weekend..maybe.

  • djson1

    I actually know a Manchu girl who lives in Beijing. She refers to herself as “Man”…short for Manchurian. I think people in China (especially in the northern regions) are probably mixed Manchus in more numbers than reported but since they are all mixed or integrated, it’s tough to get an accurate number.

  • djson1

    It also has to do with the preceding dynasties. Before the Manchus, the official court language was dependent on where the dynasties originated. For example, during the Tang, the dialect may have been closer to southeastern dialects, which is why loan words in Korean are pronounced closer to Cantonese dialects versus Mandarin (since many words were borrowed pre-Tang)

  • A Korean

    “which is why loan words in Korean are pronounced closer to Cantonese dialects versus Mandarin (since many words were borrowed pre-Tang)”

    I doubt that. Tang dynasty was a long time ago, and China had several other dynasties since then, and the whole time we’ve been sitting next to/near them.

    BTW, djson1, you can’t “delete” comments – courtesy of disqus. :)

  • redwhitedude

    Another thing that I heard that will complicate things is that the chinese during the cultural revolution did away with their jokbo.

    What was the population of Manchus during the Qing dynasty?

  • redwhitedude

    Yeah. I get the feeling that PGH is trying to steer a rudderless ship.

  • redwhitedude

    You should check out the mongolic Xianbei. That’s what happened to them between the Han and Sui dynasties. They carved up northern china among various Xianbei states. I think there was one instance where the King forced adoption of the chinese language and dress by banning Xianbei language and dress.

  • pawikirogii

    you are in for a nice treat, djson! after twenty minutes, the action starts and never lets up! btw, there’s a website out there that will actually teach you the basics of manchu. manchu words always follow the consonant/vowel rule almost like korean indigenous words. enjoy the movie!

  • pawikirogii

    :-)

  • wangkon936

    AK,

    It’s true. Many of the Chinese borrowings into both Korean and Japan came from the Tang Dynasty.

  • redwhitedude

    However there have been attempts a linguistic accuracy such as the controversial movie Passion of the Christ. They used aramaic and latin. But this is going off on a tangent.

  • redwhitedude

    Maybe it’s me but I found the plot a little bit lacking.

  • A Korean

    Tang is not pre-Tang, is it? :)

    Besides, Tangs were decidedly of the northern stock, and there elapsed more than a thousand years since the Tang era in which things went back, forth, and around the NE Asia for word borrowings and etc.

  • Gubook

    As a small aside, Shigenori Togo (famous for opposing Japan’s war with the US as un-winnable) was descended from Korean potters kidnapped during the Imjin Waeran. Not terribly sure about how well known the Admiral is across the strait but the war clearly affected Japanese society in more subtle ways. (read a marked improvement in Japanese pottery / tea culture)

  • pawikirogii

    it’s an action movie, red. plot is second in these kinds of movies.

  • redwhitedude

    You could say the same thing of the transformers. Hardly good movie. Still the action has to have a solid plotl ine.

  • pawikirogii

    take a look at an easy to understand website about manchu language.and grammar.

    미니아마 할빈데 에레 만주기슨 다치레 비테베 우다하

    In Harbin my father bought this book to learn Manchu.

    http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Manchu/Lesson_2_-_Nouns

  • pawikirogii

    just so we have context, please give me a few action movies you thought were good.

  • redwhitedude

    The original Conan the Barbarian, and the original Robocop, that would be the first one.

  • pawikirogii

    wow, they are super old! i suppose we have different tastes. i thought the transformer series was awesome and i also liked sam raimi’s spiderman series. the newest superman was also top notch. don’t like the x men franchise, ironman, or captain america. lastly, i thought the pirates of the carribean series was excellent fun!

  • redwhitedude

    Yeah that too. Spiderman with Tobey Maguire. Iron Man isn’t bad but Captain America is good too. Pirates was too. I think the good ones that I mentioned are partly due to casting as well. Arnold Schwazenegger and James Earl Jones, Peter Weller as RoboCop.

  • cactusmcharris

    Eating Raoul

  • Aja Aja

    The first fifteen seconds sounds like Mandarin, because it has the word Hunmin Jeong Eum – a translation of classical Chinese into Korean, a Chinese vocabulary in itself.

    But listen carefully to the rest of the speech text sounds. I don’t think it sounds like Chinese at all.

  • silver surfer

    They toned it down.

  • silver surfer

    Ah, the inevitable ‘tu quoque’ response of the Korean apologist. Why’d you delete it?

  • silver surfer

    Probably not. But, in general we are aware of the defeats we’ve suffered in our history (after all, there are so few that they’re easy to remember) – Robert the Bruce, Owen Glendower, Joan of Arc, the battle of Islandlwana, and the American War of Independence. It’s really an indictment of Japanese education and culture if they’ve never even heard of Yi Sun Shin.

    This (http://www.revolutionspodcast.com/), btw, tells you everything you want to know about the American Revolution. This guy is brilliant. He did the entire history of Rome from Romulus and Remus to the fall of the western half of the empire. Now he’s working his way through the famous revolutions of the world. He’s already done the English Revolution (lots of stuff I was ignorant of), the American, and will be doing France next.

  • silver surfer

    But wouldn’t you agree it sounds closer to Chinese than the Korean of the present day does? A bit more tonal?

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.kr/ Horace Jeffery Hodges

    King James Bible, not St. James Bible. I’ve not heard that James has been declared a saint. Except in your comment, of course . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • redwhitedude

    Great Britain had lots of colonies to deal with so they could be giving some attention to India, Africa, and so forth. That’s a lot of areas to be aware of because of its far flung empire at the time.

    As to Japanese education it shows that they are at the level of Chinese. Apparently these Chinese from what I’ve heard are taught the Korean War was started by the South and I don’t have to tell you the treatment of the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution. I wonder if Korea is the same but since Koreans didn’t do any conquering at the time period in question it isn’t apparent.

  • pawikirogii

    i had to look this one up. i placed it on my netflix. btw, you guys, there’s this english dude named ‘korean englishmen’. he has a vid interviewing people at a superjunior concert in london. at about 2:10, he interviews this pretty black girl. she starts in english but then switches to well accented korean. thing is, she learned from books and ktv. never been to korea. surprising. have a look.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AANU7gYfA5Y

  • Seoulgoodman

    It took place hundreds of years ago. Why would and should the Japanese care? Heck, according to what I read, most Koreans didn’t care until the early ’70s when the South Korean government was looking for a national hero to exploit the nationalistic sentiment.

  • silver surfer

    Why would or should the Japanese care or at least know about Hideyoshi? Everything he did took place 100s of years ago, too. The Japanese are selective in which historical events they choose not to acknowledge.

  • silver surfer

    I agree it shows they are at the level of the Chinese, and that’s a damning indictment.

  • redwhitedude

    It seems like nationalism is plaguing the history education in both countries. It may be more subtle in Japan’s case. Korea is probably just as guilty on this as well.

  • Seoulgoodman

    As everybody else. So, nice try playing the victim.

  • djson1

    You couldn’t be more wrong about Koreans not caring about the Imjin wars and Admiral Yi before the 1970s.

    “According to what you read…”? How about citing some sources? I guess it was your wife again who told you all this? AND just because something took place “hundreds of years ago”, should that mean people don’t take any interest in their own history? By your logic, I guess we Americans should not care about anything before the 1800s…since it’s “hundreds of years ago”.

  • Seoulgoodman

    Are you even old enough to have known the ’70s, or even the ’80s?

  • Sumo294

    Lol–just saw this–you are right of course.

  • djson1

    I definitely wouldn’t expect the Japanese to know Yi Sun Shin, but at least they should know the history of the Imjin wars and the reasons why they retreated back to Japan after two failed attempts to move on to China. I don’t think they even know much about those wars.

  • silver surfer

    If everybody’s the same, then why do English people all know about Joan of Arc? Some nations teach history more objectively than others.

  • Seoulgoodman

    Joan of Arc? Are you kidding?

  • norimix

    Most Japanese aren’t taught historical facts that shed weakness in Japanese history.. However, I heard that naval academys around the world including Japan study Yi Sun Shin’s battle stragedies. Admiral Togo who many in Japan consider their greatest admiral and hero defeated the Russian Baltic fleet in 1905. At a celebratory dinner many praised his victory by comparing his accomplishment to that of English Admiral Horatio Nelson in reply to this Togo said “I appreciate your compliment. But,…if there ever were an Admiral worthy of the name of ‘god of war’, that one is Yi Sun-sin. Next to him, I am little more than a petty officer.” Togo was known to have a shrine to Yi Sun Shin to which he made offerings and prayers to before battles.

  • norimix

    Yo Sun Sin was a true hero.. Do a little studying before spouting your ignorance

  • redwhitedude

    The KEB putting a huge mural in the office window in downtown Tokyo?? That’s in your face promotion. I don’t question Yi Sun Shin being a hero.

  • silver surfer

    No, I’m not kidding. She’s a famous historical figure from another country who inflicted a major defeat on ours. A bit like Admiral Yi, if you’re Japanese.

  • Seoulgoodman

    When was Admiral Yi canonized?

  • redwhitedude

    I think everybody is guilty of not shedding the historical weaknesses to some extent. However the point that you make about Yi Sunshin is that unless you are involved in the navy you are probably not going to have a full understanding and appreciation of Yi SunShin’s accomplishments.

    Also I don’t get why people downplay history by saying “it happened 100s of years ago”. Well if you are a history buff then you will care. We all study histories that happened hundreds of years ago growing up but we just don’t care because it is irrelevant to our daily lives. Its the politicians who make a beef about it to score political points and that is something that people should be wary. Making it political.

  • wangkon936

    … and Neo-Confucianism. Don’t forget Neo-Confucianism. The
    Tokugawa bakufu ate Neo-Confucianism up because it gave the state the ability to mantain control and order without having to fight off dozens of warlord challengers.

  • norimix

    “I think everybody is guilty of not shedding the historical weaknesses to some extent. ”

    I think Japan is famously known for leaving out factual events in their historical text books which causes friction between them and rest of Asia to this day.. When I was in college my roommate was a Japanese International student and he admited that he was never taught about Japanese brutality during WWII. He claims that he was made to believe that Japan was a victim of Western aggression (nuclear bombing) and that many Japanese believe that Koreans who live in Japan are all Yakuza or Bozozuku gang members who stay in Japan to commit crimes and terrorize Japanese community. He had to study on his own to realize that Japan’s history isn’t squeaky clean as Japanese schools made it out to be. This kind of ignorance happens because Japanese government revise and cherry pick what they want to teach their children when it comes to their own history.

  • redwhitedude

    China also is also another country that does that to a great extent. As I mentioned Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution. Not mention that the Long March was last ditch desperate attempt for the chinese to save their asses, not so glorious as they make it out to be. There were instances of Japanese tourists visiting pearl harbor who thought that the US was the aggressor.

  • norimix

    But we all expect that from China and their Intranet (firewall from hell) but Japan on the other hand has access to the world through internet in modern Japan. But, the fact of the matter is that many Japanese refuse to believe the true history because it will dishonor their heritage. Go to any youtube videos with korean history as a topic and you will see right wing japanese trolls working hard at trying to revise history.

  • redwhitedude

    But if the chinese travel abroad they’ll encounter views that clash with theirs. I don’t think they regulate people like NK.

    As to the Japanese. I guess what is being taught at school weights more than running into internet sites with different views.

  • norimix

    Most chinese studying abroad are from the privileged class of Chinese nationalists. During the Beijing Olympics there was a peaceful protest against human rights violation against Tibetans when the Olymic torch passed through Seoul. The protesters were violently attacked by international Chinese students studying in Korean universities.

    From some of the comments I’ve read from japanese right wing trolls, japanese ppl invented Hangul (korean writing system)… O__o

  • redwhitedude

    Well what can you say? That’s an indictment of the chinese “rule of law”. They are not heard in their political system so what is their way of getting heard? Just thuggish protests. They spent $40Billion for the Olympics an astronomical sum. $17Billion went towards cleaning up the environment. The 2004 olympics was very wasteful for the greeks. This and the sochi olympics redefine waste. All this because people don’t have a say and government are intent on using it as a PR and/or propaganda exercise. No wonder the IOC is not getting that many bids for the olympics. The ones that can “justify” it are those that come from countries that don’t have an open political system.

    As to Japanese right wingers. Yoko Mada and this clown of propaganda buster comes to mind. As to Chinese Duke of Qin.

  • redwhitedude

    Isn’t it funny that whenever something happens in the Korean peninsula Japan gets a boost. Look at what happened to japan when the Korean peninsula was unified under Silla.

    Heck the last time this pattern was followed was the Korean War. And you know the boost that the Japanese got from that.

  • Aja Aja

    It just opened today, to all time record opening audience in Korea, according to Dong-ah Ilbo.

    This website

    http://tvdaily.asiae.co.kr/read.php3?aid=1406812196740321008

    says that the acting by Choi Min-Shik was great, but the scenes running up to the final battle scenes were boring. The battle scenes themselves were not great, with awkward CG animations that wasn’t up to snuff to Hollywood quality (I don’t think I’ve ever seen any Korean movie that matched up to the special effects that Americans movies often contain). Maybe for the next block buster movies, they can hire American companies to do special effects, but that may blow the movie budgets out of the water.