Donald Sterling and the Koreans

The news in the U.S. that’s been the subject of water cooler talk is the National Basketball Association banning the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, Donald Sterling, from the sport for racist comments he said about African Americans and Latinos.  Recorded by his mistress/girl friend (I’m not sure what to call her because Donald is still legally married) V. Stiviano, and somehow distributed to media gossip blog TMZ, Donald apparently admitted his belief that both African Americans and Latinos were racially inferior to Whites.

The NBA is also going to force Sterling to try and sell his team, but Donald is expected to fight this legally.  Apparently, the NBA, as it is a private organization, can ban members for beliefs contrary to the organization’s mission.

So, why blog about it here?  Somehow the Koreans got dragged into this.  You see Donald has made most of his money through commercial and residential real estate.  He also manages the properties that he owns.  Many of his buildings are in Los Angeles’ Koreatown and there have been ongoing allegations that he favors Korean tenants over African American or Latino tenants.

So, leave it to Slate to capitalize on this racial train wreck with an article entitled, “What Donald Sterling’s Love Of Koreans Reveals About Racism In America.”

… here’s another piece to Sterling’s warped worldview, one that illustrates the bizarre and incoherent ways in which racism works. As Sterling allegedly schemed to rid his properties of certain racial minorities, he sought to fill his development with Koreans, an ethnic group he valorized as hardworking and reliable.

Sterling did not take a passive approach to attracting Korean tenants. He changed the name of one of his buildings to “Korean World Towers,” adorned his buildings with Korean flags, and explicitly stated a preference for “Koreans” in his housing ads.

I’m not sure if this article will be remembered in the same breath as other seminal works on race relations, but it is certainly popular.  553 comments and counting on Slate’s site as of 6:28 am GMT.

  • http://www.bcarr.com/ Brendon Carr

    V. Stiviano. With an “S”.

  • sloppycho

    And to further play up the Korean connection, here is V. Stiviano rockin’ the Ajumma look

    I knew it would take off one day… seriously. And of course the epicenter of this new fashion craze will be in LA.

  • wangkon936

    Thanks. Fixed.

  • cmxc

    The part that I don’t understand is why a former employee of Sterling says that
    she “needed to learn the ‘Asian way’ from his younger girls because they knew how to please him.”

    This seems inconsistent with Sterling’s stated preference for Korean tenants.

  • Sumo294

    His gender bias is stronger than his racial preferences–the media is overhyping his alleged racism.

  • bigmamat

    I read the article last night. I didn’t find it shocking or difficult to believe. Since when is it news that an American businessman is willing to exploit immigrants and minorities for profit? If he had owned a chain of restaurants instead…

  • brier

    “…..because they knew how to please him.” Hmmm? Am I reading this right?

    Mystery solved on why he preferred Koreans!

  • JW

    It’s remarkable that this guy was allowed to own an NBA team for so long. The recent tape isn’t even all that bad compared to some previous remarks/actions by this guy. What’s the difference? I guess social media.

    http://deadspin.com/your-complete-quotable-guide-to-decades-of-donald-sterl-1568047212

  • Gubook

    He used Koreans in a classic divide and conquer mindset, pitting the good, submissive Asians against the dirty, subversive blacks and Latinos. It’s the same sort of racial logic that fueled media coverage of the LA riots.

  • wangkon936

    Well… maybe he likes both. Physical attractiveness and reliable tenants. He is a business… man, after all.

  • wangkon936

    America’s version of Dog Shit Girl?

  • wangkon936

    $12.50!?!?!?

    http://globalgrind.com/2014/04/30/get-the-look-v-stiviano-the-v-stands-for-visor-photos/

    Wtf? I can get this at the Korean market for $3.50. Someone is making a killing!

  • wangkon936

    It’s already being called the “Paparazzi” visor in NYC…

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/donald-sterling-mistress-v-stiviano-stokes-visor-sales-manhattan-article-1.1779168

    I love how one lady said, “… such a sumple concept for people who don’t want to get looked at!” I don’t know if any ajumma wears the visor because they don’t want to get looked at… 😉

  • redwhitedude

    Yeah, especially hanging out with a guy old enough to be her grandfather.

  • djson1

    A little bit off the topic, but this whole Sterling/Stiviano media circus is really making me sick.
    From the media largely ignoring that we shouldn’t have released the audio in the first place, to the hateful hypocritical hateful comments by Sterling (a religious minority building his empire off of minorities), to the illegal shenanigans of TMZ that go largely ignored, to the extortionist prostitute now called V.Stiviano, to all the people who pretend they have no racist views, to the NBA pretending to care, to the NBA players who would gladly look the other way to get rich until it hits the media and then overreact (boycott the games? Are you kidding me?) to the general public who blindly follow what they think they need to follow to look PC.

    All disgusting.
    I think Kareem had the best outlook of all this, especially coming from a former NBA player.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/basketball/abdul-jabbar-taped-sterling-prison-article-1.1775937

  • JW

    Why is it disgusting? From a moral standpoint, I see nothing wrong with using a secret recording to expose a consciously vile worldview that interested parties *should* know about. If my boss harbored an active hatred against Asian-Americans, I would think that my right to know supersedes any reservations you might have about secret recordings. On the other hand, to use that recording as leverage for self gain is a different matter and should obviously be discouraged.

  • djson1

    What’s scary is that people see nothing wrong with using a secret recording in somebody’s home and releasing it to the public without the person knowing. We all think and say things in private that we wouldn’t necessarily communicate to the public. This whole overreaction of the recording sets a bad precedent and now you will have sleazy media outlets like TMZ going around and paying extortionists for recordings that are actually illegal and a misdemeanors in most states.

    To your point about a boss that was racist, that would depend on your personal beliefs. If your boss was an outright racist and you had an issue with it (as most would), you would probably just leave the company. But I wouldn’t bait the conversation to secretly record him and set out to ruin him. One evil deed shouldn’t justify another evil deed.

  • JW

    Let me ask you a question — do you have any moral objections to the police using a wire to secretly record a person’s conversation in order to gather evidence against that person, in the hope of eventually convicting him? I don’t find that morally objectionable. And that is basically what happened here, minus the criminal and governmental dimensions. He’s not going to jail for it obviously because he didn’t commit a criminal act. But he was caught engaging in a *socially* criminal act, and was therefore *socially* indicted and punished for committing that act. Therefore I see nothing wrong with it.

  • http://www.bcarr.com/ Brendon Carr

    Show us the warrant.

  • JW

    I figured somebody would ask about that. I’m guessing the settlement of the federal discrimination lawsuit isn’t good enough warrant for you.

  • http://www.bcarr.com/ Brendon Carr

    Settlement is not an admission of guilt. It’s not a conviction, either. It’s a calculation that it’s cheaper to get out of a dispute early.

  • JW

    Ok, then what about naming your residential buildings “Korean World Towers” ?? (lol) If you still say no, then there is no more hope for you. :-)

  • JW

    Wow, you must have a really low opinion of the US Dept of Justice. Is that correct?

  • djson1

    I see the point you’re trying to make, but I honestly don’t think those are two comparable situations. As far as I know, Sterling was telling his prostitute gf to not bring minorities to the games and flaunt it on the internet. He didn’t ban minorities from going to the games (there’s a difference). It’s like when your grandmother warned you (not necessarily your grandmother, but many out there) that you’d better not bring home a person of a different ethnicity…I wouldn’t say she committed a crime.

    Law enforcement only gets warrants issued to wiretap when they are collecting evidence against a criminal who committed a crime. They don’t wiretap powerful men just to expose to the world: “Look, this guy’s a racist ass!” And moreover, definitely not just so they could extort the guy…like Stiviano was doing (and the people who were in cahoots with her). If we’re going to start catching people committing “social criminal acts” (not really illegal stuff but non-PC talk), then like I said, TMZ is going to be busy and paying a lot of people to start bugging private homes, and THAT’s where I have a problem.

  • JW

    1) You mean to tell me that you didn’t go through his rap sheet of previous racist remarks and discrimination lawsuits brought against him? That is not enough warrant for you, to conclusively state that he is an out and out racist? Wow.

    2) Comparing a police wiretap and this incident is perfectly appropriate because the nature of the physical act is PRECISELY the same. The only thing that is different is that one is done for criminal prosecution reasons and the other is done for social prosecution reasons. Why should that make any difference? Socially “lychmobbing” him is not categorically different from the government throwing you in the slammer for the purposes of this argument. They’re both appropriate punishment for wrongdoing.

    3) I totally agree with you about the extortion attempt, if indeed that is true. I think you and I can both find that objectionable without agreeing that secretly recording him and outing him to the public is an objectionable act.

  • Tapp

    Getting a wiretap isn’t an open and shut process. Police can’t just decide to tap anyone they want. They have to prove to a judge that they are pursuing a case. Despite the shenanigans of the NSA last year, police are not allowed to blanket-tap the population or even a group of the population. The most important aspect is that there is another entity that controls the wiretap. There is a system of checks and balances in place to protect US citizens from illegal search and seizures (4th amendment). In many states, it is even illegal to have audio recording on security cameras because people could be recorded against their knowledge. TMZ and Stiviano illegally recorded a conversation without Sterling’s approval and they are both benefiting financially for it. He will sue the shit out of both of them.

  • djson1

    Personally, I don’t have a huge problem with Sterling’s degree of racism. I have a much bigger issue with the way he was baited into his racist rant (privately in his home) and the illegal recording released to the general public. Again, I know I may be in the minority, but I do feel strongly about how this whole thing went down (and not because I like Sterling).

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    He was the owner of a largely black team, in a largely black basketball league, with a significant black fan base that spent good money on Clippers tickets and apparel. And yet he was unequivocally racist against black people. Is it illegal? No. But black Clippers fans deserve to know how the team owner feels toward them.

    His girlfriend was sick of it and wanted to show the world what a true bigot he really is. As far as baiting him, you can’t bait someone to say something that they don’t actually believe. She may have led the conversation, but he shared his explicitly racist thoughts with her. Nobody put words into his mouth.

    I haven’t read any real comments on the legality of all of this. Any California lawyers that can comment?

  • pawikirogii

    just to be fair, would it be ok if korean journalists exposed the real identity of jake of expat hell?

  • Sumo294

    I am not for it–Jake of Expat Hell is not an intrinsic danger to the ROK–he is not trying–for example–to disenfranchise all property owners and then rounding up the petty bourgeois into “reeducation” camps. There are far more serious issues in Korea–one more atypical liberal white guy from America writing “serious prose” and pursuing his dream of writing a “ground shaking” travel anthology should not be a priority in anyone’s life. Everyday someone takes a test that tells that person he or she is smart–they go study in classes that tell them that they are now knowledgeable and combine that with a sense of exceptionalism then you have another typical self righteous liberal.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    When the netizens go crazy with death threats and harassment, will their identities also be revealed? And will the police actually arrest and press charges for the threats and harassment?

    Jake is a bitter blogger who rags on the dark sides of Korean society. He isn’t a hypocrite who gets rich off Koreans while hating them in private.

  • Sumo294

    Native: Why should I listen to you?
    White Liberal: Because if you listen to me I will fix the environment and you and your family will live long lives and prosper!
    Native: Why should we listen to you?
    White Liberal: Because if you listen to me I will usher in an era of global peace and you and your family will live long lives and prosper!
    Native: Why should our nation listen to you?
    White Liberal: Because if you listen to me I will not only improve your native cute culture but I will also–for the minor price of taking away all of your stress inducing material assets–improve YOU!

  • JW

    Well of course getting a police wiretap is a much more involved process. The authorities use it to throw you in jail!

  • pawikirogii

    sigh, i’m talking about the issue of privacy. mr sterling’s privacy was violated and moves the ball closer to the day that we can’t be secure in our own homes. you want to get mr sterling, that’s fine but don’t go into his home to record his private conversations unless you feel he’s committed a crime and you go through proper procedure. my god! what is happening to this wonderful country?

  • pawikirogii

    you are creating lots of conditions. if it’s ok for mr sterling to have his privacy violated for being a bigot, then why isn’t it ok to violate jake’s privacy for being a bigot? asking what happens afterwards isn’t answering the question, mike, and you know it.

    and just for the record, i’m against what was done to mr sterling and see it as a gross violation of his privacy. i also support jake’s right to anonymity though his blog isn’t his house or home.

  • pawikirogii

    and disliking black people isn’t a crime and saying such in your own home shouldn’t be either.

  • Sumo294

    Its a thought crime–if you even think it–you are guilty. Also–according to the liberals–there is no difference between racial preference and racial prejudice. For example, if a liberal white guy prefers to marry a liberal white girl–that man is guilty of a racist act.

  • http://www.bcarr.com/ Brendon Carr

    California is a two-party consent state. V. Stiviano has committed a crime if she has recorded Donald Sterling without his consent. That is why she has offered the thin gruel of an excuse that Sterling had asked her to record him at all times — because Uh oh, this is criminal conduct. Anyone remember all the outrage on the left when James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas uncovered actual criminal conduct with its hidden camera investigations, and how gleeful they were when they could finally punish O’Keefe?

  • JW

    We never were fully secure in our own homes. That’s just a pipe dream. Currently 38 states plus Washington DC do not require both party consent for recording a conversation no matter where it takes place. Only requirement is that you have to be a party to the conversation.

  • JW

    “if it’s ok for mr sterling to have his privacy violated for being a bigot, then why isn’t it ok to violate jake’s privacy for being a bigot?”

    If it’s true that this Jake character is a bigot on the same level as Sterling, the answer is YES, for the sake of those people around him who deserve to know. However, conditions obviously do come into play when making the actual decision. You wouldn’t want to out a Muslim hater in a Muslim country, for example.

  • http://www.bcarr.com/ Brendon Carr

    Who gives a shit what 38 states plus Washington DC do? The only relevant question is what is California’s law on this point. In California, the law says a person does have the right to be secure against being recorded in his own home.

  • JW

    Who gives a shit? Apparently Pawi does, since he was wondering about what was happening to this “wonderful country”. I was replying to his comment.

    Btw, to address your question in particular, the legality of the question doesn’t matter ONE IOTA as far as discussing the morality of this incident is concerned. Besides which, as I implied by mentioning the 38 states, the legality is pretty randomly distributed across the states so even if you were to take that into consideration on whether to find it objectionable, you have no ground to stand on.

  • Sumo294

    Brendon–when have liberals cared about law and order? To them all of America’s laws are just a road stop to their destination of socialist utopia via the UN. Their incredible most wonderful intellect with the legitimacy of having studied under famous and awesome professors means that they are the who that understand how to interpret laws through a modern liberal ethical perspective for the betterment of mankind. If a good contentious liberal who donated a lot of money to environmental causes beats his girlfriend into a coma–why he made a mistake and the law should not be bent and law and order should be . . . etc. Its about them and how they see the world. No one else is intelligent enough or compassionate enough to ever understand their sacrifice in being the protectors of what is wonderful in this world.

  • JW

    LoL. Enough said. Thanks for providing cause for a hearty laugh this morning. One more day and it’s friday…

  • djson1

    “His girlfriend was sick of it and wanted to show the world what a true bigot he really is.”

    You’re giving her too much righteous credit here. She wasn’t sick of it when the flow of expensive gifts and money was good. She only got sick of it when Sterling’s wife sued her and she saw the gifts reduced to a trickle. Some of us can see right through that.

    Also, it was baiting in every sense of the word. If you listen to the recording, he wants to stop talking about it but she keeps bringing him back. And she does try to put words in his mouth by saying things like “Do you want me to change the color of my skin?” and he replies emphatically “NO…”. He was obviously confused by her line of questioning in the recording.

    Do the fans need to know he is racist? Maybe…but they definitely didn’t need to know this way. I just want TMZ and Stiviano to get sued to the ground for all this.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Social prosecution? You do understand what rule of law means, right?

  • Bob Bobbs

    She was so sick of it that she sat courtside with him and ___d his ____.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Morality is an ever-moving target. That’s why laws are made by elected officials.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Now you discriminate against Muslims. You’re not very consistent.

  • JW

    No, I don’t. Wikipedia says

    “Despite wide use by politicians, judges and academics, the rule of law has been described as “an exceedingly elusive notion”giving rise to a “rampant divergence of understandings … everyone is for it but have contrasting convictions about what it is.”

    Enlighten me with your wisdom, if you don’t mind.

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  • Tapp

    The differing results doesn’t magically make one wiretap legal and the other against the law. Again, in most states it’s not legal to record a phone conversation without notifying them beforehand. That is the reason you have the obligatory “this call may be recorded for quality assurance……” message at the beginning of most business related phone calls. When you take emotion out of the equation, Stiviano broke the law, Sterling did not.

  • http://www.rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Just to make sure this stays at a theoretical discussion, let me make clear that should anybody try to “out” Jake here, the comments will be erased and the commenter immediately banned.

    Thank you for your cooperation.

  • brier

    I just clicked over at his blog, and all the content is gone. (or my computer is messed up.) A shame. His writing is excellent.

  • bumfromkorea

    … was someone seriously threatening to “out” him?

  • brier

    I have no idea.

  • Bob Bobbs

    If you see villagers with pitchforks and flaming torches, there is an 8.75% chance that you are not being dealt with under the rule of law.

  • Bob Bobbs

    So I suppose you don’t have a huge problem with me putting a microphone up your ass and broadcasting all your half-baked ideas to the world?

  • Bob Bobbs

    Good good.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    Yes, you have a point. And as Mr. Carr has said, her actions were probably illegal under CA law. We’ll have to wait and see how this plays out.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    No, it was just a comparison since he was a recent topic on here. But RK’s right – we wouldn’t want this to sound like something more than a theoretical debate.

  • bumfromkorea

    Oh, I just thought that because the site has been wiped clean.

  • I AM IN ODE

    Sterling was talking in private, he didn’t do anything illegal. If you don’t get it then fuck off.

  • djson1

    Was that to me, Bob? If it was, maybe you should learn how to read first.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Your first sentence was so half-baked that I skipped the rest.

  • djson1

    So, you’re not dyslectic, just incapable of comprehending the whole point of my original post.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Do you honestly not have a problem with someone who doesn’t want black people attending his basketball games?

  • djson1

    He never said he didn’t want black people attending his games (which would be impossible at an NBA game). He was telling his “GF” not to bring minorities with her and then posting the pictures online. Yes, it’s a racist comment, but it’s far different from what the media led everyone to believe. Either way, it’s an ignorant comment, I agree…but it’s still different from a blanket statement about just not wanting black people at the games.

    I see it this way: his old racist peers (inner circle of influential investors) were probably telling him that it was an embarrassment that his “GF” kept flashing pics of her online with all these “minorities” and that it made him look bad (to his old peers). I think that’s what he was trying to tell her and he didn’t have the proper filters on when he was conveying that to her. Either way, my point is, I have a bigger issue with the illegal recording than his degree of old racist views. If I had a problem with every person who had this type of view, I would not be able to live anywhere. If you talk about Cliven Bundy though, that’s a different story.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Then we are largely in agreement. This thread is long and tortuous. I still ‘have a problem’ with his views, but we are now splitting hairs: I understand that the views of an 81-year old are not those of most people alive today.