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Korea a great place to get fertility treatment… as long as you’re officially married

A piece in the, again, the Chosun Ilbo notes a rather odd quirk that’s hurting the medical tourism industry.

Namely, a number of foreign couples who come to Korea for artificial insemination procedures are being denied the procedure because they aren’t officially married.

Korea’s biological ethnics law apparently requires couples to submit a marriage certificate or a similar certification before they can undergo an artificial insemination procedure. This particularly sucks for potential patients from Russia and elsewhere in the former Eastern Bloc, where—due to decades of rule by godless commies—only about 60% of couples living together are officially married.

Some 90% of foreign patients who come to Korea for fertility treatments come from Russia and elsewhere in the former Soviet Union. Over the last three years, the number of Russians who’ve come to Korea for fertility treatments has quintupled.

Anyway, some now ask if perhaps some flexibility might be required in the case of foreign patients.

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  • SeoulGoodman

    “biological ethnics law”?
    Given the topic of the story, I’ll file that one as a Freudian slip.

  • seouldout

    Seems to me when someone intends to go overseas to undergo a medical procedure one would be inclined to do a bit of research first.

  • redwhitedude

    If they reversed the law to foreigners then it would be seen as giving preferential treatment to foreigners, so it would have to be all or nothing.

  • SeoulGoodman

    Typo still not corrected? It should read “ethics”, not “ethnics”.

  • setnaffa

    Seems okay to me… But those who oppose it may not be thinking about the children’s future…

  • bigmamat

    And the American says….who needs to be married…why is that a criteria….

  • redwhitedude

    I see a boom of paternity tests.

  • seouldout

    Presently Korea has laws on the books that give preferential treatment to foreigners, for instance gambling in a casino and attending international schools.

    Just sayin’.

  • redwhitedude

    Is there an outcry over that? I’m not sure if fertility treatment is going to be the same case.

  • SeoulGoodman

    Not all casinos here are closed to Korean citizens.

  • seouldout

    Almost all are. My point still stands. The law provides for a more preferential treatment to foreigners since they are not restricted.

  • setnaffa

    How is that related to medical tourism?

  • redwhitedude

    I wonder if polygamist are allowed then if their respective countries recognize polygamy?

  • seouldout

    It’s a reply to redwhite’s comment that “preferential treatment” can’t be given to foreigners, most of whom are tourists.

  • seouldout

    I don’t know if there is an outcry or not. My comment merely provides you two examples of “preferential treatment” given to foreigners showing you that no, it doesn’t need to be “all or nothing”.

  • setnaffa

    Okay, I can see your logic now that you have explained it.