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Homeless foreigners? Seriously?

The JoongAng Ilbo reports that Seoul had got homeless foreigners, and figuring out what to do with them is a bit of a headache.

According to the piece, there are about 60 homeless foreigners in four shelters in Seoul, and probably more roaming the streets.

Fun fact: Foreigners are apparently not allowed to make use of government-run homeless shelters:

“When government-run homeless shelters take in Koreans, they receive government subsidies, but there is no money earmarked for foreigners,” said Kim Hae-sung, director of the Global Village of Love-Sharing.

An official from the Ministry of Health and Welfare admitted that foreigners were excluded from standard homeless shelters. “We have enough trouble supporting the Koreans,” he said. “It is hard to pay attention to the foreigners.”

Somebody clearly didn’t get Joseph Carens’ memo.

The Justice Ministry claims that it can’t simply deport homeless foreigners if they’ve got legal visas. I’m not sure why that is, and it seems to me it would benefit everyone involved if the ministry just rounded these folk up and put them on a plane back home so that their families, friends and—more to the point—taxpaying countrymen can take care of them.

Well, anyway, we are warned if Korea doesn’t do something about this, it could become yet another social issue:

“If we do nothing about homeless foreigners now, they can grow into a new social problem,” said Kim Young-ran, professor of social psychology at the Sookmyung Women’s University. “We need to create a system to protect them at the existing welfare centers for the homeless.”

This story does bring back memories, though. I remember when I first moved up to Seoul there was this homeless Westerner who used to live outside on the hill overlooking Noksapyeong Station. Used to wear a hanbok top. Lovely gent, I recall, but clearly a bit down on his luck. I believe he has since returned to his homeland.

Thailand reportedly has a foreigner—well, Westerner—homeless problem, too, albeit much worse. Alcohol and bad business decisions (often linked to bad romantic decisions) seem to play a major part in the Thailand case.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Taxpayer subsidized educations in poli-sci at Berkeley for Koreans illegally in the US for decades, and not even a spot on the floor of a cold-weather shelter for a homeless foreigner in Seoul’s -20 weather. That is barbaric. What hypocrisy.

    On what grounds can you deport them? For not being rich enough? That’s discrimination. If they can’t get welfare and can’t even get into a shelter, how are they are a burden on the South Korean taxpayer? Let them stay. When one considers some of the filthy, cold water, 5th floor walk-up, roof-top shacks that foreigners call home in Haebangchon, one could easily deport them for not being rich enough. There was a 90 year old woman who lived in an unlit cellar under a staircase directly behind the Kyungridan who made her living by recycling cardboard and rolling cigarettes out of butts she found in the garbage who was kicked out when her building was given a facelift and turned into ‘luxury’ apartments- deport her too? To where? Why?

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Is Korea duty bound to tolerate them? If they are not productive, kick them out.

  • gbnhj

    The Global Village of Love-Sharing? Which shares only with locals, because they don’t get any money by helping non-Koreans? They may want to consider a name change.

  • Stephen

    I do see some major hypocrisy here in that 60 homeless foreigners are too much of a burden to support, yet how many (illegal) Koreans are living off subsidies in the US? Homelessness and unemployment in Korea should not be viewed as merely a Korean issue.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Productive? Like running a brothel productive? Or running an illegal hagwon that takes passports from its foreign workers productive? Running a sweatshop that chains its workers to their machines productive? Lynching dogs and burning their hair off with blowtorches productive? On those grounds, a lot of Koreans could be kicked out too.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    You cant very well deport a citizen, can you?

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Deport them, too. There is no way that foreigners should be added to the ranks of home-grown parasites.

  • Bob Bobbs
  • Stephen

    You do realize if Korea deported its homeless foreigners in exchange for homeless Koreans abroad Korea would have a serious deficit to work with. Fortunately not all countries in the world would abide by such a barbaric, inhumane immigration policy.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Barbaric and inhumane?

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    LOL, OK, but if we are going old school then instead of exile or banishment I say burn them at the stake.

  • Bob Bobbs

    You’ve lost me on that one. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRrcaC2Jass

  • Stephen

    I wouldn’t expect someone who labels the homeless “parasites” to understand barbaric and inhumane, so you are forgiven.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    The definition of parasite fits perfectly for those living off others. If the shoe fits, wear it.

  • JoeChicago

    No but according to your anology we should arrest unproductive citizens and kick out unproductive foreigners.

  • Stephen

    You assume the homeless live off others of their own free will. The handicapped, mentally ill, physically old and unable who only need a roof over their heads and a hot meal aren’t half the parasites of our corrupt government officials. Supporting the homeless should be the least of your worries – take a look at where your taxes are really going.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Not really. Look, I accept that the welfare state is here to stay and the short of a revolution and the complete downfall of democracy and the State, people will vote themselves a larger and larger share of Other People’s Money. That is the unfortunate thing about living among this vile species we call Humans, which for the most part aren’t worth their weight in coal. I get that. But there is no reason to add more weight to an already sinking ship. Get the merely unproductive, and especially those sucking up any benefits, out of the country.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    I realize that, yet there is no good reason why any country must support or tolerate outsiders.

    We are talking about 2 different things and I don’t see why we need to prioritize. Both problems: that of corrupt officials and corporate welfare and that of welfare for civilians should be addressed simultaneously.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    Considering many English hagwons pay late (or never) and can fire teachers for little or no reason, it’s not surprising that there are homeless foreigners here. If Korea actually enforced its labor laws, many of these homeless people could afford a plane ticket out of here. Foreign teachers shouldn’t have to repeatedly call the labor board to force their schools to cough up paychecks or honor the clauses in their contracts.

    I know many people rag on unqualified English speakers finding easy work in Korea, but some people who come teach here have no support back home. Flying halfway across the world only to get financially fucked over with little recourse to the law can seriously screw up lives.

  • Wilson

    It’s not hypocritical for the South Korean government to enforce its laws just because the US government fails to enforce its laws against Korean citizens in the US. The majority of Americans support rounding up and deporting illegals i.e. enforcing the law. The US government has been failing to enforce the law. The South Korean government has nothing to do with the US government’s failure to enforce its own laws.

  • stereotype

    Just for comparison.
    There were 2,024,089 people who received public welfare money from the Japanese Government for no income or very low income families as of July 31, 2011. The welfare money is large enough to cover rent and food for a family. Of the 2,024,089 people, 43,479 were foreigners, of which the largest group was North/South Koreans with 28,796, followed by Filipinos with 4,902 and Chinese with 4,443.
    If you can read Japanese, read here for statistics.
    http://www.e-stat.go.jp/SG1/estat/GL08020103.do?_toGL08020103_&listID=000001107137&requestSender=search

  • stereotype

    I mean 2,034,089 people in Japan.

  • Bob Bobbs

    You misread the article: they are not deporting them because of the Immigration Act, not in spite of it.

  • Bob Bobbs

    ‘The merely unproductive’ could sum up millions of South Korean university students. Deport them too?

  • Cham

    What hypocrisy? The Korean Justice Ministry isn’t actively lobbying for Ju Hong to get a Political Science degree from Berkeley.

    Looking at a group of people numbering in the tens of millions as one entity with a collective conscience is faulty logic (no matter who does it, Korean, American, what have you) and just too easy to point fingers at.

    Furthermore, the Justice Ministry isn’t deporting them. There are no grounds, as you have said, so there are no deportations. You’re getting worked up over something that just isn’t happening.

    Finally, I agree with some of what you have to say. Korea has come to a point as a nation where it can start to pull some more weight and help those who are in need, Korean or not. But everybody starts somewhere and I figure now is a good time for Korea to start as a society.

  • Cham

    Which houses 40 of the 60 foreign homeless people. Sounds global enough. Plenty of love-sharing too.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Again, you cannot really deport a citizen. You can banish one but who will take them? This isn’t Ancient Greece with empty hinterland just beyond the borders of the polis.

    For the unproductive of the home-grown type, roll back all state assistance and thin them out.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    There is an edit button that comes in handy for correcting mistake, i.e. editing.

  • Bob Bobbs

    No, but the Korean government did lobby to have Korea included on the US visa waiver list despite the Korean tendency to overstay. They bear some responsibility. As for generalizations, I didn’t invent the Minjok; Koreans did.

  • stereotype

    Thank you, SalarymaninSeoul.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Work houses? Transportation? You do realize the 19th century is over, right?

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Unfortunately it is over. You speak as if the 19th century was worse than the 20th. Less wars, less welfare, less parasitical entitlement. Look at the world today and all the people with messed up lives, more often than not of their own doing, feeling entitled to be taken care of at the expense of others. Is this better?

  • Bob Bobbs

    You have a powerful sense of nostalgia.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    No, simply a sense of justice

  • Bob Bobbs

    À la Roland Freisler, perhaps.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    You think you’re cleverly getting around Godwin’s Law with that one, aren’t you?

  • JJ

    Jake at Expathell.com was on this issue years ago. This is one of several posts on the topic: http://www.expathell.com/?p=3728

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    We are now at a stage where talking about rolling back what amounts to theft on an unprecedented scale is compared with Nazism. Amazing.

    http://www.examiner.com/article/how-the-single-mother-factor-was-responsible-for-obama-s-win-1

    Classic democracy at work. Give Democracy another generation and the people who messed up their lives will vote themselves more and more largesse from the public purse.

  • Bob Bobbs

    ‘Parasites’ ‘Thieves’ ‘ Revolution and the complete downfall of democracy and the State’

    - You’re the one stealing the playbook from Goebbels.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Goebbels was an anarchist?!

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    I am using the words without any normative intent. An organism that lives off another is a parasite. It is observed in nature and differs from a symbiotic relationship in that the parasite never does anything beneficial for the host. Thieves, likewise used without any normative intent, are people who take what isn’t theirs. Now, I should refrain from the word thieves because they don’t actually take the risk that a thief takes. Instead, they collude to hire a band of robbers who do the thieving for them.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    You should not that the comment about the downfall of the State wasn’t prescriptive. I simply noted that in this far-gone state, welfare will be impossible to roll back. People have been made to feel like they are entitled to free stuff, no questions asked.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Goebbels advocated the end of democracy, the rise of the Fuehrerprinzip and the overthrow of the Weimar state. Parasites and htieves were common Nazi terms for Jews and other undesirables. Your rhetoric places you squarely in the camp of those seeking to dehumanize others for selfish ends.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Having seen both welfare dependency in the UK and Ireland and authoritarian rule in the USSR and China, I would always choose the former. Should it bleed into the latter, we’ll all suffer- but don’t hasten its arrival.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Goebbels advocated REPLACING one State with another, not an actual downfall of the State.

    You think I dehumanize others and yet you support programs that make infants out of adults, that hook whole generations up to the teat of Mother State and that present tax payers as ATMs that are OBLIGATED to support other adults, no questions asked. Maybe I don’t want to be an ATM to help you because you’ve made mistakes and can’t deal with the consequences. I will help you if God messed you up. But you’re on your own otherwise.

  • Bob Bobbs

    We’ve been through this before. The creation of the welfare state was an attempt to downwardly distribute wealth to stave off another war. Your Thatcherite war on society crashed the global economy in 2008, but you still sing its virtues.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    I’m not British, and had nothing to do with Maggie. As I recall, it was rather sub-prime lending, motivated by your sort of lispy liberalism that nearly crashed the global economy in 2008. The roots of the whole crisis go back to policies that are decidedly liberal: easy money (inflation) and altruistic lending because everyone deserves a 2 garage home and a picket fence no matter how unworthy a credit risk they are, combined with moral hazard (onus here on the bankers than the schmucks who shouldn’t have been lent to).

  • gbnhj

    Good point, Cham. I hadn’t realized that when I commented, but would have if I’d only clicked on the link. Apologies, especially to that organization.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Which brings us back to Itaewon Station: how can you punish these homeless guys more than the bankers who caused such misery? Let them stay. It’s not illegal to be homeless per se, although it often leads to illegal behaviour. Deport them for that if they do it, but not for some arbitrary notion of productivity. Good night, y’all.

  • Cham

    The visa-waiver list is completely independent of how the US chooses to treat anyone who chooses to overstay their welcome.

    That’s on US policy and US policy alone, not some hypocritical backbreaking campaign by the Korean Justice Ministry to get undocumented Koreans into prestigious universities. How the US decides to treat its undocumented population is completely devoid of hypocrisy on any Korean governmental institutions’ part.

    Furthermore, just because others use faulty reasoning doesn’t make you any more right. It just makes you both wrong.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Really? I guess if you hit a brick wall you “bring it back to Itaewon station.”

    Here is what I would do. I would take the bankers, and especially the ones from the FED and HUD who pretty much originated the whole fucking mess into a big stadium; the stadium would contain a big pool; I would put them all in the pool and start heating the water. Just before they passed out I would pull them out and skin them alive.

    The foreigner in Itaewon? I would simply buy him a ticket and send him home. Why subject him to the humiliation of a KOREAN homeless shelter?

  • ryuNchoosk

    Competition(when foreigners are involved) is frowned upon in S. Korea, even among the homeless. Two homeless men are on the sidewalk begging for money, one is Korean and one is waygookin, who wins the money? Hunger Games 3, SeoulStyle.

  • seouldout

    I sympathize with the view unless of course the foreigners were at some point taxpayers too.

  • ryuNchoosk

    And Seoul casinos can take all of a foreigner’s money too. Gamblers are known to get down on their luck every so often but the S. Korean gov’t only protects Koreans from gambling.

  • seouldout

    Who knows? Maybe Korea would learn something once all those welfare-consuming Koreans were sent back. Sometimes reaping what you sow works.

  • seouldout

    Calling someone a “thief” is dehumanizing?!? I can sort of understand the objection to “parasite”, but a person can certainly be a parasitic human without any loss of their humanity.

    This whole that’s-what-the-Nazis-did overreaction gets a bit tiresome. One, I think, ought to be able to use unfavourable words to express displeasure with an individual’s or even a group’s behaviour without being likened to Hitler or a member the Nazi Party.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    I have little sympathy for compulsive gamblers, but I do find it ridiculous that Koreans aren’t allowed in casinos (except the one in Gangwon-do). The government wants to protect its own citizens from blowing their money, but it happily lets Chinese and Japanese gamble away their savings.

  • seouldout

    Maybe the Chinese can return the favour by opening Korean-only opium dens.

  • seouldout

    Bastards appropriated the name of my swinger’s group.

  • http://www.rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    OK, that was funny.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    I’m guessing most (or all) of these Koreans, Chinese, and Filipinos are permanent residents of Japan whose families relocated their during the Japanese Empire, or maybe even naturalized citizens. In either case, they are just as deserving of government welfare as any Japanese person. This is what happens when you colonize large parts of the world, as Britain has found out.

  • cardigan stewz

    all in time

  • seouldout

    If they are a customer of educational services they are productive. If they’re sitting around looking for a handout of free education they ought to be deported.

  • seouldout

    Streets need sweeping. Recycled garbage needs sorting. Heck, many unemployed single mothers complain they can’t work because there’s no affordable childcare; assign the caregiver role to some so the others can work.

  • seouldout

    Jeez dude, you’re kinda insensitive. An utter waste of taxpayers’ money to heat that swimming pool. The skinning alive could proceed without it and at a great savings.

  • stereotype

    Just a couple of facts.
    A naturalized citizen is by all means Japanese and does not count as a foreigner.
    Japan did not colonize the Philippines.
    As of 2011, there were 545,401 North/South Korean registered foreigners (foreigners who stay in Japan longer than short term visa allows), of which 60,262 were permanent residents and 385,232 were special permanent residents. A special permanent resident is a descendent of citizen of Japanese Empire who immigrated to Japan before the end of ww2.
    There were 674,879 Chinese, of which 182,216 were permanent residents and 2,597 were special permanent residents.
    There were 209,376 Filipinos/Filipinas of which 99,604 were permanent residents.

  • Aja Aja

    28,796 ethnic Koreans, out of 600,000 who were mostly born in Japan, getting welfare. Is that it? The way the Japanese go on and on about how Koreans are on welfare, I thought it would be far more.

  • Aja Aja

    Where is the hypocrisy? It is up to each individual nations to protect their own borders and enforce immigration laws. If the US doesn’t want to do it by deporting illegals, or help foreign citizens getting subsidies, then it is your fault for being so generous.

  • Aja Aja

    To qualify for the VIsa Waiver program, the country applying for the program has to have less than 3 percent of its overstaying rate. Now I don’t know the latest figures, but the last time I heard, South Korea was well under that rate. It is possible the number of illegal Koreans increased, but the rates of overstay still decreased due to the fact that the number of Koreans visiting the US has increased a lot.

  • RElgin

    This is true enough.

  • RElgin

    Oh man . . .

  • Anonymous_Joe

    That’s over 5%.

    Compare it to, say, the way some go on and on about E2 visa holders and AIDS infestation in Korea. Does anyone have the E2 AIDS stats?

    BTW, I’m thankful that I’m an F and not statistically prone to the AIDS virus.

  • Aja Aja

    But then the Korean government can argue right back and say the low E2 AIDS stats is due to strict policies requiring foreign teacher applicants to take the AIDS testings, which kept out all the AIDS carriers.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    Well, what was the rate before the prescient Korean government took out the insurance policy to make assurance double sure?

  • Bob Bobbs

    The article states that SK is the country with the fifth highest rate of overstaying, behind places like Mexico and Guatemala. Not much to be proud of.

  • Bob Bobbs

    The Korean government is well aware of how often its citizens overstay visas in the US. It is also well aware how long these people stay and that many of them become educated in the US while illegal. It IS hypocritical of them to lobby for inclusion on the visa waiver list. As for logic, Koreans love to tout their Borg-like sameness as one of their national strengths. Heaven forbid that I should use it against them.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Without the tidal wave of drugs awaiting him on the streets of N America, he might be better off in Itaewon Station.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Consumption is not production.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Streets and garbage where these people come from are tended to by unionized city workers. Parents would never let their kids be tended to by the homeless.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    Yes, it is. Consumption is a component of GDP. It contributes to the economy, which is productive.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    No, they did not colonize the Philippines. But they did occupy it from 1942-45. And now Filipinos are residing in Japan. Sounds about right.

  • wangkon936

    My personal opinion is that they should stay in Korea and be homeless in Korea so they can be a burden on Korean taxpayers and not a burden on me…. ;)

  • wangkon936

    Wow Bob. Has your interaction with Koreans been mostly these trades?

    You may think that statements like this make Korea and Koreans look bad… but…. they make you look bad too.

  • ryuNchoosk

    Yeah, opium with Russian Roulette, Korean males could go to China to play with guns like Korean women go there for abortions.

  • seouldout

    Kinda missed the point, didn’t ya? There’s plenty of work to be done by the homeless and those who survive solely by public assistance – for the sake of brevity I merely provided two examples. As for unions, they aren’t everywhere and in every industry. I’m sure something can be found for them to do. Though North Americans may balk at having the homeless care for their kids they have no problem hiring public assistance recipients to do so and clean their homes. Plenty of part-time nannies/sitters and cleaning women work in the underground economy wherein they’re paid in cash so as to not jeopardise their handouts.

  • Aja Aja

    According to US immigration office, 59% of illegals
    are from Mexico (6.8 million), El Salvador
    (660,000), Guatemala (520,000), Honduras (380,000), China (280,000), Philippines (270,000), India (240,000), South Korea (230,000), Ecuador (210,000) and Vietnam (170,000).

    For South Korea’s case, this has little to do with the visa waiver program, since the year 2000, the number of South Korean illegals were already over 170,000. way before the Visa waiver status took effect. If that program was the cause

  • Aja Aja

    That’s what they should have done long ago, and send all the illegals packing. Not just as a revenge for ‘reaping what you sow’.

  • Wilson

    I did understand the article. I’m talking about the general principle here.

  • Timo

    More an issue of dealing with mental health than it is about the greater treatment of the homeless. Isn’t this why most of the foreign homeless are homeless?

  • Wilson

    The US visa waiver allows people to visit the US for 90 days without a visa. It doesn’t allow people to overstay this period. The South Korean government has no bearing on the US government’s failure or refusal to enforce its own laws and policies on international travel and immigration.

    As for generalizations and the concept of the Minjok, you can generalize the Koreans as a group but it still wouldn’t be a case of hypocrisy, since the Korean government doesn’t control the US government’s failure to enforce its laws.

  • Wilson

    You’re not using it against them though, since the head of the Borg, the Korean government, is not causing the US government to not enforce its laws and policies regarding international travel and immigration. There’s no hypocrisy. The Korean Borg has no bearing on the US government’s enforcement of immigration and travel policy. The US government does not care what the Korean Borg thinks about US immigration policy or any other policy for that matter.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    You cannot be serious….can you?

  • http://www.rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Church!

  • wangkon936

    Kinda. You are referring to the Keynesian Model: Y = C + I + G + (X-M) = GDP

    Where C = Consumption, I = Investment, G = Government Expenditures and (X-M) = Net Trade.

    In this model C is a driver of Y, which really isn’t production, but output (a.k.a. GDP). C contributes to production because it drives more demand, which increases production.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Or they can acknowledge that it’s a human rights abuse LKE THE UNITED NATTIONS HAS DONE. They also might try to change Korean thinking on STD prevention (pretty non-existent), sexual assault (pretty backward) and prostitution (far ahead or far behind or just as schizophrenic as the rest of the world).

  • stereotype

    Japan occupied Vietnam, Malaysia, Cambodia, Burma, Singapore and Indonesia as well as the Philippines during WW2. Why only Filipinos? The fact is the brief occupation during ww2 has almost no relation to immigrants in Japan today.

  • Bob Bobbs

    These people are NOT being rounded up. The law IS being enforced. Which principle are you talking about?

  • Bob Bobbs

    Oh yeah? Well your aspersions on my aspersions make YOU look bad!

  • Bob Bobbs

    Our friend’s rhetoric often uses dehumainzing terminology, and advocates violence in pursuit of ideals. That is exactly what the Nazis, among others, did. Compare him to Mussolini, to the Falangists, to the Ustashi, to the Klan or to Boko Haram- you still have a bloody-minded, slightly unhinged person (who apparently has co-workers and/or family. How lucky for them.)

  • Bob Bobbs

    Do you know how high rates of hard drug usage are among the homeless in N America? Higher than someone who’s really high on hard drugs. At least they avoid that, and its accompanying violence.

  • Bob Bobbs

    That is pretty funny: we HAD a record of overstaying, but now that we don’t need visas we are sure to go home. I don’t buy it.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Frankly, I doubt that. Gyopos and their offshore mother ship lobby like anyone else. They’ll eventually find a friendly ear in government.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Until you’ve tapped out the savings of the entire middle class on sending their kids back to school again and again to keep them out of a sinking economy. Then it’s just good money after bad.

  • Bob Bobbs

    And here you go again with the violent imagery. I understand that you may have lost faith in what is left of the democratic process, but, well, if you’re a teacher you are setting a bad example.

  • seouldout

    Seems you have some problems following the conversation; look at the comment above mine.

    And no, I’m not a teacher.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Indeed.

  • MikeinGyeonggi

    No, it is not related. But the fact is that Japan colonized and occupied many countries in the last century, so it has no right to complain about immigrants now.

  • ryuNchoosk

    If the Korean gov’t can argue that(E-2 low AIDS stats) then why haven’t they? That was a rhetorical question and here, I’ll even show you why. Because that would go against their agenda of stigmatizing E-2 teachers/foreigners having AIDS and intentionally spreading it around S. Korea, to S. Korean students, girls, and people.

  • TheStumbler

    How can I apply for this homeless foreigner visa which prevents deporation? With all the hassles I had last year getting my D-8 renewed, this seems like a breeze.

  • Yep

    But if course you can only talk about while doing absolutely nothing.

  • Keni

    Brothels are not exclusive to Korea. Chaining workers to machines is something I’m hearing for the first time and probably not something that’s common since koreans usually stick to their factory jobs for decades at a time. You should see the way cows and chickens are treated in your country before you talk about treatment of animals in another country. Weak straw man.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Ok, scratch that: brothels being on every block is exclusive to Korea. You’re right, Koreans are very respectful of their foreign employees. Korea is my country, dog lynching and hair singeing be damned.