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Suspected American pedophile caught in Korea

This is just great:

An American man suspected of sexually abusing minors in the United States has been arrested in South Korea after an eight-year-long international manhunt, police here said Friday.

The 44-year-old suspect, whose identity has been withheld, is suspected of raping minors in the U.S. state of Kentucky four times between August and October 2003, according to the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency (SMPA).

The suspect entered South Korea in 2004 via Thailand, the SMPA said, adding that he has since been working as an English tutor at private institutions, elementary schools, and universities in the southwestern Jeolla provinces, it added.

Amazing Raylan Givens hadn’t caught him earlier.

Now, you’d think the tightened E-2 regs would have prevented something like this. Apparently not, though:

한편 지난 2010년 7월 회화지도 강사에 대한 사증발급지침 변경으로 비자신청시 범죄경력조회서가 요구되자 A 씨는 지난해 9월께 미국 범죄경력조회서를 FBI(미 연방수사국)로부터 우편으로 발급받아 제출한 것으로 알려졌다. 하지만 이 조회서엔 확정된 판결만 기재될 뿐 수사중이거나 수배된 사실은 기록되지 않아 E-2비자 재발급에 아무런 문제가 없었던 것으로 확인됐다.

외국인 출입국 관리와 회화지도 자격 비자 발급에 큰 허점이 드러난 셈이다.

So, just so we’re clear, you’re saying the FBI criminal checks teachers are supposed to submit DON’T include whether the guy is wanted or under investigation? Seriously?

The Korean cops are saying he hasn’t done anything in Korea and that they’ll simply extradite the guy to the United States. Frankly, though, given that a) he’s been in the country since 2004, and b) if the charges are true, he enjoys raping children, I find it hard to believe he didn’t do anything here. I hope the cops thoroughly investigate every aspect of this guy’s life for the last eight years before turning him over to the Americans.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • Brendon Carr

    Does nobody understand the difference between suspicion and conviction anymore?

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Headline better now?

  • Yu Bum Suk

    “I hope the cops thoroughly investigate every aspect of this guy’s life for the last eight years before turning him over to the Americans.”

    And risk embarrassing how many hagwon owners and school and university administrators? Much better out of sight and out of mind. Just remember that a good percentage of foreign teachers are perverts, Korean public, that’s all you need consider. Oh and we need yet more screening that fails to keep scum like him out.

  • Brendon Carr

    This rubs me the wrong way, in part because of Tamerlan Tsarnaev and the hullaballoo over He was on the Terrorist Watch List and still the NRA would let him buy a gun!!!1! Eleventy.

    Well, yeah. There is a profound difference between being suspected of a crime and convicted of that crime. The United States of America should not be a place where having your name placed on a secret list by a bureaucrat results in the denial of your Constitutional rights Because Shut Up, That’s Why!™

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Now you sound like a crazy libertarian. What about the rights of the Majority?

  • http://www.expathell.com thankswww

    Yup, one doesn’t actually get a “criminal record” until one is convicted. Korea’s E2 regulations only keep out convicted criminals, not fugitives.

    As big a shadow as this casts on resident expats; the Thais catch something like one or two of these guys A DAY and deport them.

  • http://tesslerdavis.tumblr.com/ jd

    What are the chances the alleged victims are either his own kids or his ex-wife’s relatives and the accusations all came out during his divorce?

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Well, yeah. There is a profound difference between being suspected of a crime and convicted of that crime. The United States of America should not be a place where having your name placed on a secret list by a bureaucrat results in the denial of your Constitutional rights Because Shut Up, That’s Why!

    I agree. But at the same time, Korea doesn’t have a constitutional obligation to allow entry to foreigners wanted in their home counties.

  • Tapp

    An FBI background check is for convictions, citations, and fines. Nothing else will show up because they have not been proven guilty. If charges were dropped or a conviction was expunged, it also does not show up. The US still lives by the “innocent till proven guilty” rule and job discrimination based on something that you haven’t even answered for would go against that concept.

    Sidenote: In 2000, I was working at a bar/restaurant and moved to the other side of the country. Unbeknownst to me, my manager used my move as an opportunity to steal a large amount of money from the store and blame me. For a short time, I was wanted for questioning without ever knowing anything was going on. The guy was eventually caught, but I didn’t find out that my name had come up for several years. My only point is, we don’t know this story at all. The guy is wanted for questioning. He has been caught. Let the courts work through it now.

  • keith

    @Tapp, you’re wrong. Charges and even expunged records show up on the CRC from the FBI. An American guy I know was charged with a crime when he was younger, charges were dropped, he had the record expunged and it still showed up on his FBI check.

    You are not innocent until proven guilty, despite what some people would like to believe.

  • MiltonFriedman

    #5 SalarymaninSeoul

    What about the rights of the Majority?

    Are individual rights collective? Do they add up?

  • http://www.san-shin.org sanshinseon

    But you should be. America has so shamefully many false convictions (even in death-penalty cases), to say nothing of accusations.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    #3 Yu Bum Suk: “Just remember that a good percentage of foreign teachers are perverts, Korean public, that’s all you need consider.”

    I can only imagine that it would be a really bad percentage, but since you know the percentage, tell us. Be specific, Yu Bum.

    Oh and we need yet more screening that fails to keep scum like him out.

    Oh and I think that Korea already has too much screening that fails to keep scum like him out.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    3.5432510% to be specific

    Korea just doesnt screen for everything. I say screen for everything.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Milton we will be friends. No is the answer to your question. My remark was fully sarcastic bit since you are new here you wont be familiar with my position on these matters

  • Maximilian

    Don’t panic, more AIDS tests will solve this problem!™

    (brought to you by the Korean government)

  • PC Bahng or Bust

    - This statement is true:

    Charges and even expunged records show up on the CRC from the FBI.

    - But it does not necessarily make this statement true:

    You are not innocent until proven guilty

    You can have a warrant for your arrest issued, be arrested, be charged and still be considered guilty until convicted. Neither a warrant nor a charge is ‘proof’ of guilt, only convictions are.

  • PC Bahng or Bust

    Rather: ‘innocent until convicted.’ It’s almost impossible to believe that an FBI CRC wouldn’t show charges and/or warrants. I know the CPIC system in Canada does.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    13, come on, your sarcasm-detector can’t really be that low, can it?

  • Pingback: English Teacher in South Korea Accused of Molestation | ROK Drop

  • Tapp

    @10 As of 7 months ago, I know specifically of 2 teachers with expunged drug convictions that did not show up on criminal background checks. One of those teachers had her conviction show up on an FBI background check the previous year. She was able to get it expunged and it did not show up on the second background check. Your American friend might have had the charges expunged at the state level, but his state did not pass that information on to the FBI.

    I just did a little more research, and it entirely depends on the state. New York, for instance, does not allow for expungement. It will always show up in their system and, in turn, show up at the FBI level. The FBI check is more of a gathering of state records. If it was an expungement in Missouri, the record is completely purged from the system and cannot be tracked by any police agency. Since the FBI is just collecting the information given by the state, it will not show up.

    So, it entirely depends on which state you were arrested. We’re both right.

  • jkitchstk

    # 20
    Koreans don’t need to expunge their sexual assault/rape/pedophile crimes, they automatically expire after a few years. So when they want to go to America then they can, no problem. Or has things changed on pedophilia?

  • http://populargusts.blogspot.com/ bulgasari

    You have to love the cartoon the Munhwa Ilbo made for its articles – it might even beat North Korean propaganda at its own game.

    There are also a few comments pertaining to this case at ROK drop by someone who claims to know the accused that make for interesting reading (here and here). Who knows if they’re true …