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FLOTUS tweets kimchi recipe, sun still rises in the morning

Michelle Obama has tweeted the White House kimchi recipe.

I take it “Napa Cabbage” is the English name for baechu. And has nothing to do with the Napa Valley.

This was apparently the first recipe the FLOTUS has posted in her second term.

I’d very impressed if the White House went old school and buried the kimchi in the South Lawn.

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  • wangkon936

    Somewhere TK is having an aneurysm.

  • KWillets

    Napa is a Chinese variety of cabbage. The valley’s name is Native American, probably Patwin.

  • wangkon936

    Here is the link to the tweet:

    https://twitter.com/FLOTUS/status/299339932613353473

    Interesting comments.

  • http://www.askakorean.net/ The_Korean
  • http://www.askakorean.net/ The_Korean

    Some moron said fish sauce not usually a part of kimchi. IT’S WHAT MAKES THE DISH YOU FUCKING IDIOT. I should stop reading these comments.

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ Kuiwon

    Where’s the outrage from all the Koreans? This seems to be an attempt at claiming the Korean national dish as American, analogous to how the Japanese tried to name Kimchi “Kimuchi” several years back.

  • http://twitter.com/HubOfErik Erik Cornelius

    “I’d very impressed if the White House went old school and buried the kimchi in the South Lawn.”

    Which makes me wonder: What would Mrs. Obama find if she dug up the South Lawn of the White House?

  • http://www.rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    60% of Korea’s jeotgal comes from Ganggyeong’s Jeotgal Market.

    The More Your Know.

  • cm

    Have you ever tried buried kimchi? I tell you right now, the kimchi fridges cannot even compare when it comes to properly fermenting it. It just tastes out of this world. It’s that good.

  • bumfromkorea

    Lincoln’s secret gay diary, Kennedy’s secret tweets from the dark side of the moon, and the corpse of Clinton’s secret Alpha Centaurian prostitute.

    Oh, and Saddam’s weapons of mass destruction. It’s always in the last place you look.

  • Cloudfive

    It wouldn’t surprise me one bit if Sasha and Malia had SNSD and SHinee posters hanging on their walls.

  • KWillets

    Not if Handol Foods gets control of it.

    (drama reference.)

  • dlbarch

    I was tempted to bait TK with a comment about how, since kimchi is really originally from Japan, Michelle Obama should correct her tweet to read “kimuchi,” but instead I’ll just observe that when reading MH’s comments’ section gets to feel like this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYQdogPMuRc&feature=endscreen&NR=1

    …then it’s time to take a break and go skiing.

    Or whatever.

    DLB

  • yangachibastardo

    Fukin’ second that…i miss the good old days when my balcony was a little greenhouse, well friday afternoon is no time for nostalgia and remorses…anyway i really like kimchi (that’s probably the most intelligent comment i ever made on this board)

  • yangachibastardo

    Now you know what it means to expect pasta and be treated with fettuccine Alfredo :)

  • http://www.askakorean.net/ The_Korean

    Thank god I am not from a country whose cuisine is widely bastardized around the world. If I were an Italian or Chinese, I really would have been dead from brain aneurysm already.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dcmusicfreak DC Musicfreak

    If it’s good enough for Chef Boyardee to put his face on the can, it’s good enough for the masses!

  • yangachibastardo

    Wait before you sigh your breath of relief, in 5 more years of Hallyu time the world will be ready for hobbrobriums like kimchi pasticcio…

    Speaking of hobbrobriums: once we couldn’t find Chinese cabbage (that’s how they refer to baechu here) so we attempted a rather botched experiment. We made some kimchi with a local produce we refer to as radicchio …i think you guys call it chicory in America. Anyway the thing is from my mom’s area of origin so i’m kinda fond of it, despite the fact it’s pretty much unedible crap, as it’s definitely too sour for human consumption.

    Needless to say the experiment turned out more awful than awful but i can die a proud man as i survived the sulphuric acid kimchi

  • http://www.askakorean.net/ The_Korean

    I once had a meal in a nice restaurant in Seattle that purported to serve kimchi. What came out was a mixed green salad. No spice, no garlic, no salted vegetables, no fermentation. Just a mixed green salad, somehow named kimchi. If I had not been with my wife at the time, I might have burned that restaurant to the ground.

  • gumiho

    A few years ago, my wife finally had me dig a big hole in the yard to store the surplus of Kimchi we seem to produce every year. The jars sit in a big garbage container sunk into the ground, and covered over with insulation, and an insulated’hatch’ cover. We always grow way more cabbage and radishes than we have room for in the two refrigerators inside. Of course, this is in Michigan, so it gets some curious looks from the neighbors.

  • wangkon936

    Well, I kinda saw this coming… three years ago.

    http://www.rjkoehler.com/2010/01/21/its-like-cabbage-crack/

  • cm

    modified to suit the local tastes. Good on the restaurant. Korean food should not stay static. Recipes should be changed and new things should be tried and ingredients updated. This is why Korean food will never catch on in the west. Most of the world outside of Korea demands variety in cooking and new ideals. The problem with Korean food is that there’s only one way to do things, and if you deviate from it, it’s a big no no. What Koreans need is a more open mind, willingness to share the culture.

  • dogbertt

    One wonders if there was a 15th C. version of “The Korean” who fulminated against the introduction of hot peppers into Korean cuisine.

  • http://www.askakorean.net/ The_Korean

    Fuck you and your slavish obsequience. Korean food does not have to change anything to “catch on in the west,” nor does Korean food have any “problem.”

    Korean does not need to “catch on in the west.” It only needs to stay true to itself, and the rest of the world will come to it. If the rest of the world does not come to it, all the better–there will be less temptation to bastardize.

  • yangachibastardo

    In all fairness Korean food is indeed good and very different from most stuff in the rest of Asia…said so it took me quite a while to appreciate it cos well it is fairly complicated to make. I’m not by any stretch a gifted cook but still my stove skills are more than passable, nonetheless my initial attempts were literally disastrous. Gradually i improved and now i can make more than decent (i’ve been told by Koreans, i wonder if they were trying to be diplomatic) 꼬리곰탕 and 돼지 불고기 (very spicy, my favourite Korean dish) but i have to say Korean food can be pretty unforgiving on the novice

  • cm

    Lol.. ok.. whatever.. Korean food doesn’t have to catch on in the west, and I don’t really care whether it does or not. But there’s constant stories in the Korean media on how to spread the Korean food to the world to the point of unnatural obsession which I find annoying.. so I’m just pointing out where the problem is.

  • wangkon936

    I once heard a black comedian say that Bill Clinton will be the closest thing to a black president that African Americans will ever have. I mean, he’s from the South, he plays the saxophone and he loves to sleep with ugly white women.

    Well, let me be the first to say that Barrack Obama will be the closest thing we get to an Asian American president. His step-dad is Indonesian, he’s from Hawaii and his family eats kimchi.

  • Cloudfive

    I’ve heard Bill Clinton called the “black president” more than once. Besides the reasons you mentioned, he was also best friends with Vernon Jordan.

    If you want to claim him for the Asians, let’s first spell our current President’s name correctly – Barack with one R. :)

  • yangachibastardo

    I’m no big fan of his policies (and let alone his cabinet) but he seems also a competent and quite strict father so yeah you have a point, plus he seems genuinely curious about Asian education systems

  • KWillets

    Buddhist temples may disagree with you, and clearly garlic has inflamed your passions.

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ Kuiwon

    I’m a bit split. How do you reconcile your beliefs with the fact that Kimchi originally didn’t have pepper (고추가루)?

    On another note, I have a poetry translation about storing Kimchi (김장) for the winter up on my blog: http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/2013/01/25/kwon-geun-storing-kimchi/

  • dogbertt

    I asked the same question already in this thread — he might answer yours.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    Dude, are you really that desperate to get friends on Facebook? ;)

  • SomeguyinKorea

    Curious? You think he just stayed at home while he lived in Indonesia?

  • SomeguyinKorea

    FLOTUS is an unflatering acronym. To me, it sounds like what you’d call a US President themed float in a parade.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    Well, I’ve seen some pretty ridiculous things done to a hamburger, even in the US.
    …Oh, you’re trying to say you’re from South Korea…Cute.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    And you went there just for its “kimchi”? Sucker!

  • SomeguyinKorea

    As if Koreans don’t do the same thing.
    Explain to me the fucked up recipes that Pizza Hut comes out with in South Korea…Better yet: the corn.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    Red peppers are from the Americas. Yes, kimchi is fusion food.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    I find POTUS and particularly SCOTUS comical.

  • yangachibastardo

    Didn’t he go to some kind of international school ?

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ Kuiwon

    Sorry did not see that. Still getting used to this format.

    I would imagine TK would say something to the effect that Kimchi maintained its essence despite the addition of pepper and that you can still find non-peppered Kimchi out there. That would bring up the question of what additions are permissible and what are not. I think very few Korean nationalists would consider peppered Kimchi as foreign.

  • dogbertt

    I expect he will say the addition of hot peppers was permissible, because it was Koreans themselves who adapted them to their food. He might have a point.

  • Horace Jeffery Hodges

    “It’s always in the last place you look.”

    That’s what they say . . . but would anyone keep looking for something already found?

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • Horace Jeffery Hodges

    Hobbrobriums? YB, I believe you’ve just coined a new word! Is it a portmanteau of “Hobbesian” and “opprobrium”?

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • SomeguyinKorea
  • yangahcibastardo

    No it’s just broken English :)