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The Coming South China Sea War

ship_radar_targetCrystal balls and star maps are sometimes used to predict the future but a more constant means of prediction can be had in observing people and their countries and their actions.  The People’s Republic of China has been preparing for war on its neighbours under the auspice of defending its territorial claims upon open sea.  The PRC now states that it will board any ship that it chooses to board within the South China Sea area as it, based upon its contentious claim upon the whole area of open sea. As per a recent article in the China Daily,

. . .from January 1, Hainan police will have the authority to board and seize control of foreign ships which “illegally enter” Chinese waters and order them to change course or stop sailing . . .

This act alone could easily set off a military incident in the region since the PRC’s claims are unprecedented in history.  The PRC is attempting to claim territory that is well over the 12-nautical-mile limit that is considered to be the international standard.

The point has been reached where a real incident can easily occur.  As per one report:

. . . a Chinese navy frigate had directed its fire-control radar at a Japanese destroyer in the incident on Jan. 30 near the islands in the East China Sea, known as the Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in Chinese. The uninhabited island group has been controlled by Japan for decades, but claimed by China and also Taiwan.
On Tuesday, the Defense Ministry also disclosed that a Chinese frigate had directed the same kind of radar at a Japanese military helicopter in a previously undisclosed incident on Jan. 19. (cite)

The time is approaching when the PRC will start a real war and containment will become confrontation.

About the author: Psst, want to buy some used marble cheap?

  • http://profiles.google.com/dcmusicfreak DC Musicfreak

    Headline confuses the geography of the seas in play with Japan.

  • wangkon936

    China is no match for the combined fleets of Japan and the U.S. Don’t let the peace constitution fool you. Japan’s navy is a formidable regional force. China wouldn’t stand a chance against the U.S. missile technology aboard Japanese Aegis cruisers. Thus, China’s their only recourse is unnerve the Japanese through North Korean-like brinkmanship.

  • yangachibastardo

    Yeah i’m a bit confused too. As apparently the Hainan poice is involved i assume the article is indeed referring to the South China Sea.

    Is China stirring up shit with S.E: Asian nations there (with a possible return of the race riots in Indonesia) ? Are they teaseing Japanese interests there ? What kind of interests ?

  • http://profiles.google.com/dcmusicfreak DC Musicfreak

    Sloppy composition. East China Sea=China vs Japan. South China Sea=China vs Vietnam and/or the Philippines. (Frankly I wish the world would find names for these waters that don’t contain the word China in them.)

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ Kuiwon

    It’s even worse in Korean. I’ve seen it more referred to as “동중국해(東中國海).” The fact that there two directional words (중/中 means center and 동/東 means east) together confuses me. I’d like to see the alternative word, “동지나해(東支那海),” used more often.

  • Adams-awry

    Sloppy post, full stop. And hysterical. As per [sic] usual.

  • RElgin
  • RElgin

    Read that first citation again and you will understand the title better.

    Maybe I should call it the “Pacific War” since China is resorting to threats almost everywhere in the Pacific region.

  • Chris Smallwood

    I do believe I’ve mentioned this several times. China desires to seek regional hegemony. They’ve developed their own economy and military tech and now wish to expand their sphere of influence to encompass the other countries in the region. The only flaw is that the USA maintains a large military presence which includes a large amount of floating firepower.

    Now there won’t be any big wars in the region as China would be on the losing end and would be forced to resort to nukes. That action would be predicted by everyone involved and they would use nukes on China’s nukes first and this escalate everything into WWIII. NOBODY wants WWIII, so instead we’ll get showmanship and lots of threats.

  • Hitokiri 1989

    I really don’t think there will be a shooting war ordered by the CCP. There is too much at stake. The problem is radical nationalists in the military, like Japan in the 30s ironically, that might stir shit up. We all better hope that the party really does control the guns.

  • RElgin

    That sounds plausible. I would also say that the PRC leadership creates the conditions for this to exist and they are known to screw up.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jimmy-TheFish/100000139595167 Jimmy TheFish

    Wrong chris I want ww3 I know you do too

  • stereo

    PM Noda proposed to China use of ICJ on territorial disputes in his address to the UN general assembly last September. So far, China does not want peaceful resolution of the dispute.

    This is what a Chinese admiral proposed to Admiral Timothy J. Keating, Commander, U.S. Pacific Command.
    http://www.japansociety.org/page/multimedia/articles/us_pacific_command_perspective_on_security_in_northeast_asia
    “Take the Pacific, cut it in half. You, the U.S., take Hawaii east, you put your carriers and ships there, you stay there. We’ll take Hawaii west. We’ll put our carriers and ships there. We’ll share whatever we get with you, you share whatever you get with us, and we’ll save you the time and the trouble.”
    I think “West Pacific” includes, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, New Zealand, Australia, the Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore. With that much under its control, China can take the remaining half with ease.

  • wangkon936

    Sounds like what Japan asked for in “peace” talks with the U.S. in 1940-41.

  • Keyser_Soze

    This article provides, IMHO, a very plausible scenario:

    http://pumasunleashed.wordpress.com/2013/01/21/china-will-trade-debt-for-us-land/

    “This discussion highlighted something that hadn’t occurred to me
    before: That an attack on Vietnam is the “logical” choice for China.
    From China’s point of view, there would be several advantages:

    It would raise far less nationalism in the United States than would attacks on Japan or the Philippines.

    China has a score to settle with Vietnam, following the 1979 China-Vietnam war.

    The motive would be “kill a chicken to scare the monkeys,” as the old Chinese saying goes.

    It would assert complete control over the South China Sea.

    China claims that America has been a troublemaker in the South and
    East China Seas, because these countries have been confronting China in
    the confident belief that they would be defended by the U.S. If the U.S.
    does not defend Vietnam, then the other countries would no longer feel
    confident, and would no longer challenge China.

    It would scare Japan, so that China could take control of the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands, and Japan would retreat.”

    The rest of the article doesn’t deal exclusively with the South China Sea conflict, but is sobering and worth a read.

    It would scare Japan, so that China could take control of the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands, and Japan would retreat.

  • stereo

    Wangkon936, do not you know the history?
    In July 1941, US Government suddenly froze assets of Japanese government and its citizens in the US. This robbery crippled Japan since almost all of its gold and foreign reserve was deposited in New York. There were peace talks between the two governments for months over unfreezing of Japanese assets. However, US Government was adamant not unfreezing the assets, which lead to Pearl Harbor Attack in December 1941. I do not justify the attack but you should at least know the history before ridiculing.

  • wangkon936

    KS,

    I doubt it because Japan tried something similar in the 80′s. When we were buying Japanese products like there was no tomorrow in the 80′s the Japanese didn’t really know what to do with all those dollars so they bought American bonds and properties like the Rockefeller Center in New York and the Pebble Beach Golf Club in California. All these acquisitions failed badly and Japan had to get out at a huge loss.

    When you assume that the Chinese would want to own a lot of American land, you have to assume that the Chinese will 1) pay fair value and 2) know how to better utilize it than Americans. It is highly doubtful they can be successful at both. I doubt they can do better than the Japanese.

    The future isn’t so hard to predict, just look at history. Where we are going is often determined by where we have already been. When future analysis fails to take into account past performance, then future analysis has more of a chance of being very very wrong.

  • wangkon936

    Wow. Victim mentality rears its ugly head. Hey Sperwer, take a good hard look at what you are defending. Minimizing Korean claims against Japanese abuses during the Showa era empower people like stereo to move on to justifying the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

    Stereo, if splitting the Pacific wasn’t discussed by Japanese and American peace negotiators, then the attack on Pearl Harbor was Japan’s defacto way of saying “hey America, you can have your half of the Pacific and we’ll just take ours.” Just admit it. You know in your heart that’s what you believed Imperial Japan wanted.

  • stereo

    Now, everyone knows who is denying history.

  • wangkon936

    “However, US Government was adamant not unfreezing the assets, which lead to Pearl Harbor Attack in December 1941. I do not justify the attack but you should at least know the history before ridiculing.”

    Oh, I absolutely know this. I also know that the thin margins that Japan had on fuel reserves made Admiral Nagumo VERY VERY cautious in terms of sticking around the Hawaiian islands. Japan lacked fuel because the Americans stopped selling it to them.
    Thus, there were only two attacks on Pearl Harbor and not three. If there were three attacks on Pearl, then the fuel depots and dry docks would have been destroyed too. Without the fuel depots and dry docks on Pearl, it would have been much harder to support Australia and there might not have been a Guadalcanal campaign.

  • wangkon936

    What exactly I’m I denying?

  • wangkon936

    Do you care to tell us WHY America froze Japanese assets and stopped selling fuel to Japan? Did they just do it for the hell of it? Please, tell us why America was so against giving resources to Japan from 1937 to 1941. I’m all ears.

  • stereo

    For its own national interest of course.

  • Keyser_Soze

    WK, what’s different this time around is:

    The debt to China is far more massive and is held in the form of U.S. government bonds

    The Chinese government has a plan in place to choose and utilize American resources (indicated in the article).

    America is on the brink of default

    The U.S. military is about to be gutted while bureaucracies (DHS, EPA, etc.) continue to function unmolested.

    The U.S. has a president who cannot be counted on to stop such a deal, rather acquiesce to it.

    China is not an ally, under any pretense

    China won’t have to pay “fair value”, they hold enough US debt leverage to dictate pricing.

    The US federal government alone holds deed to considerable surplus property (increased since the ’90′s)

    The current US administration stands a better chance of disarming citizens who would violently oppose such a sellout

  • bumfromkorea

    Because America was jealous of Japan unifying Asia peacefully under one banner, Wangkon. How dare they interrupt the Emperor’s benevolent plan to grace us lesser Asians with the opportunity to become loyal imperial subjects?

  • stereo

    >if splitting the Pacific wasn’t discussed by Japanese and American peace negotiators
    “Splitting the Pacific?” America wanted its interest in China, not the Pacific.

  • wangkon936

    America had deep moral reservations to the conduct of how the Japanese were perpetuating their war in China. Chiefly, they were not adequately differentiating civilians from military targets, which led to gross civilian casualties. Thus, America did not want to sell the means of war (oil and scrap metal) to the Japanese if they were not going to follow the basic rules of engagement. In not selling resources to Japan, America was taking the moral high ground.

  • Hitokiri 1989

    You really shouldn’t bother Wang. We already know that people like him believe that Japan was an innocent victim of evil US imperialist aggression. Nothing you say will convince him other wise and prolonging the debate will just attract similar people.

  • wangkon936

    America wanted land in China? That’s news to me.

  • Hitokiri 1989

    Uh-oh you mentioned Japanese aggression in China. I eagerly await the replies that it was provoked by them Chinese and Comintern.

  • stereo

    So, the fact that US owned a colony in Shanghai is new to you, too.

  • stereo

    Do you think the large US bond holding by China weakness of the US government? It is strength of the US government. It works like hostage. Just say, “China, we have now frozen your bond. If you want your money back, let Tibet and Inner Mongolia be independent.” They will give up US bond holding rather than allow Tibet and Inner Mongolia independent.
    America is not on the brink of default, because US government has the right to print money.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dcmusicfreak DC Musicfreak

    A lot of misleading info and mistaken notions in here — so many that this author subtracts, not adds, to our understanding of the disputes. “Raising nationalism in the United States” is not even an issue. (Look up US treaty obligations) China invaded Vietnam in 1979 (and was embarrassed militarily although it killed a lot of VN civilians) so if anything VN might feel it has scores to settle, especially since China later swiped a few South China Sea islands by force. China is the chief disturber of peace in all these conflicts and nobody should fall for PRC propaganda on this point.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    Where did I ever DEFEND Japan? Now you’re either deliberately misrepresenting my position or, more likely, so carried away by your own biases that you haven;t been able to really grasp it.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dcmusicfreak DC Musicfreak

    These kind of comments and commenters make Japan’s handling of historical issues through textbooks etc look far worse than is actually the case — almost like a PRC netizen, with poor logic and weak command of facts. China does force a distorted, propagandistic patriotic education on its citizens and a wildly nationalistic slant in its media; Japan does not — one of the reasons Abe and his ilk want more patriotism in schools.

  • wangkon936

    Oh, and without dry docks at Pearl, there would not have been a third carrier (Yorktown) ready to bushwhack the Japanese fleet at Midway. 80 less planes would have made a difference there.

  • wangkon936

    I have never said you have directly defended Japan. I have, on the other hand, indicated that your position “empowers” Japanese apologists of this inkling and that does defend them. Thus, you indirectly defend these type of Japanese apologists by rationalizing some of their core beliefs and thus emboldens them to move on to their next logical fantasy: that they had to attack America.

    Seriously, what do you think the logical consequence would be? My request to you is to see the logical link. Japan’s conduct against the peoples of Asia AND Japan’s conduct in its war against the U.S. are linked. Japan picked a fight with America because their empire in the Pacific was based on exploitation and brutality and was thus untenable and they didn’t want America sticking around the Pacific telling them what to do.

    The same Japanese government that brutalized and exploited the Korean peninsula did so to feed their war machine, the same war machine that was used to hurl bullets at your uncle. Wouldn’t it have been better if they never even had access to Korean conscripted labor and other resources?

  • wangkon936

    DC,

    It doesn’t help that there are apparently Japanese netizens that come on this board and continuously parrot the party line to fan the flames. Evidently, someone is being taught these things in order to go online to regurgitate them.

    “Poor logic and weak command of facts” goes both ways. It appears that you are only seeing it from one way. Do you not think that the standard run of the mill logic that is demonstrated by the typical Japanese right wing apologist has poor logic and command of the facts as well, if we were to see all things equally.

  • Genie

    You sound like typical paranoid Koreans who accuse anyone who questions the validity of “Japan = evil” stories of being the Japanese right-wing apologist .

    Intellectual freedom is a very important part of any advanced society. If all you get are a bunch of yes men (or women) you end up with intellectual paralysis. In Korea, people like Lee Yong Hun who did actually research into the historical events and return with summaries saying that what people want to believe is true simply isn’t, they get generally persecuted. Cho Yeong-nam and Han Seung-jo who expressed pro-Japanese opinions and criticized Korea’s attitude toward Japan were condemned and even had to quit their jobs. Koreans just don’t understand that people have the right to present a dissenting viewpoint of history.

    Recantly, a South Korean historian has claimed he has a photo showing Korean victims of a Japanese massacre following the Kanto earthquake and the Korean media reported it as a fact without any reserch. http://rokdrop.com/2013/02/04/korean-researcher-says-he-found-photographs-of-korean-victims-massacred-after-great-kanto-earthquake-of-1923/

    The original picture is stored in Tohoku University of Arts and Design. and the caption says “Devastation of Shin Yoshiwara Park” .
    http://www.tobunken-archives.jp/DigitalArchives/record/7B3AEDEC-B2FE-26A2-FD6E-936523750A79.html?lang=en

    This picture have been on internet for a long time and it’s easy to find them. “Yoshiwara” was the biggest pleasure district in Tokyo and the dead women in the picture were mostly Japanese women who tried to escape from fire.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoshiwara

    It doesn’t take a genius to put a picture of dead bodies and titled it “Japanese brutality”, and people like you are quite likely to believe what they want to believe without any doubt. If anyone actually want to know the facts, they should not blindly believe Korean claims.

  • bumfromkorea

    And this is why Koreans and Chinese get pissed off every time a right wing nutjob in Japan gets a history textbook published to schools. Kids read that crap, grow up, and think Imperial Japan wasn’t all that bad and that the Koreans and the Chinese are just overreacting and that *they* are the ones who are brainwashed… all the while intellectually masturbating to the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere that could’ve been. If it wasn’t for those fucking Americans interfering with the Emperor’s benevolent plan…

  • yangachibastardo

    A Japanese accusing other people of conformism and yes men behaviour…hilarity ensues

  • ChuckRamone

    Invasion, colonization, plunder of resources, medical experiments, killing of civilians while retreating, cannibalism, mutilation of dead enemy soldiers, encouragement of suicide of its civilians, Kamikaze pilots (suicide bombers), Nanking Massacre, Bataan death march, Pearl Harbor … all performed by brainwashed soldiers and civilians.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dcmusicfreak DC Musicfreak

    Somebody with wide media exposure needs to put a bullet in the mistaken notions about China’s holdings of US debt that your link perpetuates. This is a pretty good stab: http://www.forbes.com/sites/kenrapoza/2013/01/23/is-chinas-ownership-of-u-s-debt-a-national-security-threat/

  • wangkon936

    Chuck,

    None of those things ever happened. If you look carefully at the caption in those Bataan Death March pictures, you will realize they are really Australian criminals being punished by Japanese police. Of course the Japanese police man gave that Australian plenty of food and water after he crossed the road to the other side of the prison, a mere 100 meters away. The Bataan Death March never happened. There is simply a lack of evidence.

  • yangachibastardo

    Well China foreign reserves are over the 3 tril. mark. On top of Treasuries they own quasi-public paper like Agnecies, not to mention all the European Govt. bonds in their portfolio that still add leverage toward the Western world.

    Overall though you are correct: China foreign reserves are a yesterday pre-QE story. The real China threat stems from the increasing dependency of foreign firms on their domestic consumption story for growth , with all the technology transfer it enthralls

  • wangkon936

    Good grief, do you mean this?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanghai_International_Settlement

    Why do I even bother?

  • http://profiles.google.com/dcmusicfreak DC Musicfreak

    I think you misread me here. I am agreeing with you, WK. I am saying that stereo, whom I estimate to be a right-wing apologist, is displaying the very same “poor logic and weak command of facts” that the detested Chinese trolls are famed for. And I’m saying that Japan’s history textbooks and education are not as distorted as they are popularly portrayed to be or as the views of folks like stereo would make us think the history education must be. And I’m further saying that PRChinese “patriotic education” and history education is far more extreme and distorted than anything Japan does. And I’m reminding stereo that Japan is held to higher standards than a communist regime, whatever social engineering and revisionism Abe and his team may aspire to.

  • wangkon936

    Wires got crossed. Sorry.

  • que337

    Aside from unproductive pride game between China and Japan, Vladimir Putin’s youngest daughter has been already engaged with Mr. Yun, the son of Korean Navy admiral. They had engagement party in Crete, Greece back in Jan. 6th:

    http://news.mtn.co.kr/newscenter/news_viewer.mtn?gidx=2013020616372990659

    Let’s see this could lead to stronger tie of Korean Navy with the Russian in terms of defense of Dokdo and Kuril islands.

  • stereo

    To make it easier for Wangkon936 to understand, I add this for his line seems always confused.
    Tibet and Inner Mongolia are not just pretext to freeze Chinese assets. America really cares for them because it suddenly woke up to altruism one day.
    America had deep moral reservations to the conduct of how the Chinese were perpetuating their war in Tibet. Chiefly, they were not adequately differentiating civilians from military targets, which led to gross civilian casualties. Thus, America did not want to sell the means of war (oil and scrap metal) to the Chinese if they were not going to follow the basic rules of engagement. In not selling resources to China, America was taking the moral high ground.

  • stereo

    What? Are you saying Sperwer had influence over me? Sorry, you are saying that Sperwer had influence over every Japanese.
    “Poor logic and weak command of facts” is the word for you.

  • Hitokiri 1989

    Opened a can of worms there. There is a clear lack of evidence for all those crimes you mentioned and Pearl Harbor was legitimate self-defence. And besides any war crimes were committed by Korean soldiers who hated Japan and wanted to make them look bad.

  • stereo

    >continuously parrot the party line to fan the flames.
    Oh, party line? May I ask party line of which party?
    > for some Japanese youths to fill in the blanks on their own through
    What? Now you are saying it is not a party line but it came from “their own thought”. I have never seen a paragraph, in which totally contradicting sentences are placed, apparently without the knowledge of the author of the contradiction.
    “Poor logic and weak command of facts” belong to you.

  • que337

    I think wangkon and you are joking to make fun of stereo.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_war_crimes

    Also, there are history records and war crime trials for Baatan death march:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bataan_Death_March

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    What’s the name again of that Korean Lt. General in the Imperial Army who was the military commander of the Philippines? You know, the one with command responsibility for all the POW camps in the Philippines. You remember, right, the same guy who gave the order to kill all the POWs before approaching US forces could liberate them, e.g. at Cabuantan and Puerto Princessa in Palawan, where they herded them into the air raid bunker, rolled a couple drums of gasoline after them and lit it up, then machine-gunned those who tried to escape?

  • Hitokiri 1989

    Irrelevant as he wore an Imperial Army uniform, obeyed the Emperor’s commands and was a Japanese citizen. His Korean ethnicity is irrelevant as he was obeying the Japanese military. I don’t understand why you bring this up. Yes everyone knows of Korean soldiers and officers in the Japanese military and everyone knows they were brutal, but they were Japanese soldiers and obeyed orders from their Japanese superiors.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    My comment was a riposte to my “friend” Que, offered in the same spirit of his “contributions”. But -So are those Koreans who want to exonerate the Koreans convicted of war crimes for their service on the grounds that they were just hapless ethnic Koreans, although they also obeyed the Japanese military and followed the Emperor’s commands, right? Whatisname just gave an order; they actually tortured and murdered people.

  • Hitokiri 1989

    Nope they are wrong and its pathethic and insulting that there are Koreans who consider such depraved men as “victims”. Those men obeyed Japanese orders and like other Japanese war criminals were deservedly punished for their crimes.

  • que337

    Mr. Sperwer, do you pick on racial profile when your determine war criminal cases committed by the US military?

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    I don’t know what you are rolling for Que, but if it’s some indication that I have something to do with the US military justice system, I don’t

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    I am happy to hear that.

  • que337

    Mr. Spwerwer, my analogy question is if a Korean American official commits war crimes, then should he be judged based on his Korean ethnicity, not the uniform he is wearing?

    No. I started to use ‘Mr.’ since weeks ago for formality’s sake.

  • platethief

    And there you have it. Anyone who disagrees with Korea, on anything, ever, is a Japan apologist.

  • Keyser_Soze
  • Keyser_Soze

    at the end of the comments section, the author Rapoza states “Ill say…stay tuned. I dont know. I dont think they’ll use it as a weapon.” He isn’t certain about his own conclusions. And how can he be? We won’t know how the debt situation will play out until it does. As for Pentagon analysis of the threat…well…i’m looking for a nice way to say they’ve been wrong before.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    No one should be judged or punish on the basis of his ethnicity, uniform or rank. The only legitimate criterion of judgment is conduct and the degree of its criminality. In the case of the Korean war criminals whose exoneration is being sought and with whose cases I have familiarized myself, it’s clear that they were convicted on the basis of overwhelming evidence of their having committed brutal acts of physical violence towards persons. If your innuendo is meant to suggest otherwise, you need to provide some countervailing evidence; otherwise it’s just another example of your flinging your own feces around and then holding it up expecting approbation instead of repugnance.

  • Keyser_Soze

    Whatever scores VN feels it may need to settle, it doesn’t have sufficient current military strength vis-a-vis China, to do much about them. A huge advantage VN had in 1979 was fresh battle experience it lacks now. VN still remembers 1000 years of Chinese occupation, they would rather not slip into that again. What helps make a war with VN especially tempting for the Chinese is that nobody is likely to intervene. Agreed on your last sentence

  • Hitokiri 1989

    But the Vietnamese, as always, will surely fight hard and give them a beating. Yeah, sure they lack the combat experience, but so do the Chinese. And besides I’m sure the Vietnamese military has designated China as their enemy and have prepared contingency plans for them. If its anything like 1979, Chinese victory will be impossible. IMO, the only risk to Vietnam is if China will limit any engagements to small naval battles over the islets, in which case the Vietnamese are outclassed.

  • que337

    Mr. Sperwer, what you’re picking on is his Korean ethnicity and expand his criminality to entire Korean populace. Don’t you think your approach a racism?

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    You’re daft.

  • que337

    Your unilateral picking on Korean ethnicity of some soldiers in Japanese imperial army makes a big contrast to your melodramatic applause to Japanese imperial military’s brutality in the war: “sense of honor”, etc.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    You also have a serious reading comprehension problem.

  • que337

    I’d like to hear your logical defense.

  • cm

    I thought that was just a bad rumor? Unlike last time, there have been virtually no story on this, this time around. I guess the press are being careful this time, since they got burned last time.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    You haven’t made a logical argument based on evidence that would warrant any defense. You’ve only made a couple of unsupported accusations that are false, not based on any evidence and that reflect only a profound obtuseness or a disingenuous one that only deserves silence or contempt.

  • cm

    Here’s the story I found from New York Post dated last November. According to it, they were to be married in Morocco, with Putin attending.

    http://www.nypost.com/p/pagesix/putin_daughter_bride_qYLc6r5CkVNVIIU6vOiQnN

    I thought Putin was against this marriage. I’ve always had the impression he is a white nationalist Russian, he would never allow a non-white to marry his daughter.

  • que337

    You highlighted it was Korean race who is culpable for the mistreatment of POWs, while Japanese brutality at the Pacific War could be understood with “sense of honor”. Why do you discriminate Koreans in your assessment of the Pacific War?

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8711750/facepalm%2Chouse-dfb6b5898f5edf288d7fdbdf6bf1edf6_m.jpg

    I didn’t “highlight” anything; i mentioned an example to illustrate why the incessant Korean wailing about Japanese misconduct is so unbalanced because it ignores the extent to which Koreans participated in exactly the same misconduct. And I didn’t say that Japanese misconduct was imo honorable; I only observed that Japanese conduct, for good or ill, involved a code of honor, albeit one very different from that of the West. I’m not going to get sidetracked into any further discussion about whether Japanese misconduct was intrinsically linked to that code of honor. Just so you get it, though, let me repeat and say it loud and clear McGuffey-style: I don’t approve of that Japanese code of honor. But that doesn’t change the fact that it was a code of honor. Similarly, it’s clear to me that there was a code of honor in Joseon times and there is a different one in Korea today – those are just anthropological or sociological facts; both, like the OLD samurai code in Japan have some attractive features; but I find all three repugnant as wholes.

  • que337

    You’re exaggerating Korean culpability in Japanese war crimes, given Japanese exploitation and coercion of Koreans in forced labor, military sexual slavery, and Japanese racial discrimination against Koreans. And while you falsely argue that it was 800k Koreans who volunteered to the Japanese military, the fact is that it was 33-37k. So your logic is based on insufficient knowledge if it was not intentional neglect.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    You still can’t or won’t get it. Go ahead keep scratching that wound, if it makes you so happy. Just don’t expect me (or anyone else with sense) to listen or care about your self-inflicted suffering except ,to the extent necessary to protect ourselves against the infection.

  • que337

    Your mind is like to blame African Americans for slavery system. Go ahead, Sir, to write petition letters to Mr. Obama to rewrite textbooks that Blacks should share their culpability of slavery, considering there were African collaborators to the system. Oh yeah, Africans self-inflicted their suffering, Mr. Sperwer?

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    Oh boy, here we go with the ad hominem. Feel free to rave on. I’m done with you.

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8711750/294x294px-LL-a0823f7c_Oh-Boy-here-we-go-again.jpeg

  • http://profiles.google.com/dcmusicfreak DC Musicfreak

    Google top China economists like Derek Scissors or Michael Pettis if you want sharper efforts than Rapoza’s. Bottom line: Nobody who fully understands how and why China builds up such reserves makes the claims that your Nobama guy makes. He is peddling a myth that keeps popping out of the mouths of politicians, bloggers, third-rate Chinese economists and some journalists and must be discarded.

  • que337

    As you wish, Mr. Sperwer, the Fair and Balanced.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dcmusicfreak DC Musicfreak

    Trolls are like weeds in your garden: Isolate and extirpate, never feed or water. Q has had years to raise his game and has singularly failed. He needs to find a new hobby or a new blog community to annoy.

  • que337

    It would be real strange a Korea blog does not have Koreans.

  • Genie

    Exactly what color is the sky in your world? China is the communist country that severely restricts its citizens freedom of speech and expression. Korean history books were written during the dictatorship era and Koreans were(are)
    not permitted to have academic freedom. The result is that Koreans have a
    twisted view of history. The historical evodences show that Korea was a vassal state of China until Japan defeated China in the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-95, but Koreans would never accept that important aspect of their own history because it hurts their national pride. In countries that permit open debate, historical interpretations can be constantly challenged, revised, maybe brought closer to the truth. In dictatorships that use history as one more tool to maintain power, there’s no such hope. Ever wonder why Korea never won Nobel Prize in the academic field? It’s because Korean education don’t teach people to uphold intellectual freedom.

  • bumfromkorea

    If you really believe that what you and the rest of the Tenno Heika Banzai squad are doing is genuine academical pursuit of historical truth, then that is a true mockery of the concept of the marketplace of ideas. It really is. It’s also indicative of just how tainted Japan still is with her past imperialism – trying to justify its own imperialism with “dissenting interpretation of history” is one of the most indicative signs of imperialism being part of the core thoughts in a society.

    Oh, and I wasn’t educated by the Korean education system that supposedly stifles academic creativity – to the point where Korea now holds one of the highest numbers of patents. Real stifling. Mhm. So you can just throw that condescending assumption out the window. Go on then. What other reasons can you think of me being so unreceptive to the idea that the Emperor merely wanted to liberate Korea from the clutches of the Qing, and even bestowed his infinite benevolence by giving Korea a chance to be his loyal subject?

  • bumfromkorea

    The big problem with your overall argument is that you’re constantly interchanging the subject. One minute, you’re talking about the Korean collaborators, and then you’re suddenly expanding that to include “99% of Koreans” who apparently were willing subjects of the Japanese Empire, and 800,000 who volunteered(!) to fight for the empire (Which we’re all still waiting for your justification – do you find that forcible draft enforced by brutal foreign police force/military to be voluntary?). Then you shrink it back to “the Koreans convicted of war crimes”, then expand it again to the entire country not 7 comments down.

    Call me crazy, but my guess is that’s what’s causing your credibility to be at the same level as Q. Either you think that the 30~40k volunteers to the Japanese army and the fact that the Korean peasants did not revolt after 3.1 Movement is enough to label the entire society to be collaborators, or you’re making a very disingenuous argument for the sake of who the fuck knows.

  • wangkon936

    bum,

    The truth of the matter is that 288k Koreans were conscripted (i.e. drafted) for use by the Japanese Army. Not necessarily all of them had guns because the Japanese were nervous about giving Koreans guns. Many were used as laborers, you know building fortifications, airstrips and the like. Only 17k volunteered.

    If Mr. Sperwer keeps on insisting that 800k Koreans “volunteered” for service in the Japanese Army then I’m just going to have to pull up the data and methodology to refute him… again…. FOR THE THIRD F*CKING TIME. Seriously, I just don’t get him sometimes. He is, however, a long-time commenter and personal acquaintances with some people in the k-blogsphere, so there is no reason to embarrass him. But he is really really wearing my patience thin.

  • que337

    Mr. Sperwer seemed to have misread this part of history:

    “Labour shortage in Japan due to conscription of males to the military result in over 800,000 Koreans emigrating there, either by choice or by force.” – Lonely Planet Korea, p38