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Trailer to RED 2

Lee Byung-hyun has got himself another Hollywood role. Or Bruce Willis got him another Hollywood role. Same difference.

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  • http://twitter.com/bighominid Kevin Kim

    So the hanja for “Lee Byung Hyun” is “tooth sickness now”?

  • Cloudfive
  • http://www.sperwerslog.com/ Sperwer

    Nice bitch tits!

  • will.i.aint

    I wonder why the last syllable in his name is transliterated as “Hun” instead of “Hyun?”

    I remember an early Hyundai auto commercial in the States that made it a point to say, “Hyundai – rhymes with Sunday.” Hence, Americans typically pronounce it “헌대” instead of “현대.” Presumably they did this because “현” just sounds to damn foreign to the western ear. I wonder if Byung-Hyun’s publicist is doing something similar?

  • Jang

    Huh, a movie that won’t likely flop? Nice!

  • bumfromkorea

    현 does sound very foreign to Americans. But his name is 이병헌, not 이병현.

    I remember the argument a while back when an acquaintance of mine insisted that 현대 was pronounced Hondai (혼다이). And I mean really insisted, despite the fact that I speak the language and am from Korea.

    Just like that old saying, 서울가본놈과 안가본놈이 싸우면…

  • wangkon936

    Uh, no. Lee’s hanja is 李炳憲 so:

    李 = plum tree
    炳 = bright
    憲 = law

  • wangkon936

    The Hyun in Lee’s name is the hanja 憲, which corresponds to the hangul 헌, which according to revised romanizatino is pronounced “heon” and via McCune-Reischauer is hŏn.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Hyun is hard to say for honkies, true. But the mistake regarding the first syllable in Hyundai is because of Hyundai’s decision to pronounce it incorrectly (like Hun Dae) in its TV ads. This might be described as tailoring the name to fit the market, or as condescension towards foreigners that Hyundai thinks are too stupid to pronounce it correctly. It’s a chicken and egg argument. Frankly, the ‘eo’ diphthong = U as in gun or fun thing bothers me too, as does the ‘Woo = oo’ thing. I know it’s a code, but Koreans get frustrated with westerners who a) don’t understand what ‘eo’ means because it’s not a diphthong in English, so they pronounce it E…O and b) think ‘Woo’ just might spell the freakin’ word ‘Woo’ which IS an English word, but it’s sort of archaic so most Koreans have never heard of it. Honestly, there is ignorance all round: westerners who can’t pronounce Korean names so they insist on calling them B.K. Kim or J.S. Park and Koreans who insist on using English pseudonyms because they think they will be discriminated against for having an odd name (which they probably will be, so they all become Julie or Sally or Kevin) and/or are convinced honkies can’t say really, really hard to pronounce names like Da Bin or Joon Ok. Now you’re getting all angry at your idiotic friend who is just repeating what he heard in Hyundai’s own advertising. Argh.

  • Bob Bobbs

    I sort of remember those too, although Hyundai still (sort of) rhymes with Sunday regardless of whether or not you pronounce the first syllable correctly.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    That’s not much better.

  • will.i.aint

    Mea culpa! I don’t follow Korean entertainment very closely. I recognize the faces of popular Korean entertainers – but I usually don’t know their names. After seeing the romanized spelling “Hun” in this trailer – and thinking that with regard to Korean names “현” is much more common than “헌” – I thought that they were pulling the ol’ “Hyundai ~ rhymes with Sunday” trick. So I googled “이병현” and there were several returns (to include images) for the Korean actor. So, I naturally assumed the correct spelling is “이병현.” I just googled it again, and noticed that it did also ask at the top of the returns “Did you mean: 이병헌?”

    I am guessing that since googling “이병현” does return quite a few results – that a lot of Koreans also think his name is spelled that way.

  • bumfromkorea

    Okay, Bruce Willis is forgiven for being in GI Joe 2 and thereby forcing me to watch it when it comes out.

  • bumfromkorea

    as condescension towards foreigners that Hyundai thinks are too stupid to pronounce it correctly

    Considering that the best attempt I heard so far in person was “Hai Uhn Dahi” after being told how the pronunciation actually went, I’d say Hyundai thought correctly.

    And as for my idiotic friend, he wasn’t convinced even after showing him a clip of Hyundai ad in Korean (‘Well, that’s just in Korea, dude. Hyundai pronounces it “Hondai”. Trust me’), so I kinda gave up after that.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Are you saying that only Koreans can say the word? I can assure you that foreigners who live in Korea and study Korean can say the word just fine and are understood by ‘real’ Koreans when they do. That is pretty funny about your friend, but don’t blame your friend. Blame Hyundai. Jimmy Fallon’s bandleader is just repeating what he heard on TV. If Hyundai had said their own name correctly, that’s what he would have said too. And, by the way, the notion that honkies can’t pronounce Korean words but Koreans are awesome at pronouncing words in other languages is pretty amusing.

  • bumfromkorea

    Are you saying that only Koreans can say the word?

    Yes, exactly. That’s exactly what I said. Oh wait, I’m not a complete moron.

    Don’t put words into my mouth. That is a terrible habit.

    And, by the way, the notion that honkies can’t pronounce Korean words but Koreans are awesome at pronouncing words in other languages is pretty amusing.

    Oh great, it’s already a habit of yours. Well, try not to repeat it a

    Or maybe we should take the Korean attitude toward all forms of non-American English (‘It’s too hard. Why don’t you simplify it?’) and apply it to the Korean language.

    Too late. Hey, you want my password and login? Why don’t you go ahead and log into my account. If you’re going to put words into my mouth, might as well expedite the process.

  • bumfromkorea

    Hey, Bob. Are you saying that Koreans are actually secret moon Nazis, and they’re planning to round up all the English teachers that they’ve been luring into their country and use them as experiment subjects for developing biological weapons that they’ll then use against Japan? I can assure you that that’s not at all what’s going on, and you thinking that is just indicative of the paranoid thoughts that Americans in Korea are so well known for.

  • http://www.rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Hey, Bob. Are you saying that Koreans are actually secret moon Nazis, and they’re planning to round up all the English teachers that they’ve been luring into their country and use them as experiment subjects for developing biological weapons that they’ll then use against Japan?

    I thought the visa application was a bit too easy…

  • Bob Bobbs

    I am neither American nor in Korea, but I don’t think it’s going too far to say that Koreans are bringing in English teachers for ulterior motives. It’s about learning the language, but keeping the culture at bay. This is not apparent from the ads on eslcafe.com.

  • Bob Bobbs

    I asked a question that was a logical response to your assertion that the best pronunciation of the word you had ever heard was not even close. I didn’t put words in your mouth, I asked a question. Are you sure mispronouncing Korean words is a habit of mine? I got around pretty well in Korea. That’s not to say that I’m fluent, but the words I did say seemed pretty well understood. I’m asking you if you truly think that foreigners cannot say the word Hyundai in a manner that Koreans would comprehend.

    First you say yes: Considering that the best attempt I heard so far in person was “Hai Uhn
    Dahi” after being told how the pronunciation actually went, I’d say Hyundai thought correctly.

    Then you say no:

    Are you saying that only Koreans can say the word?

    Yes, exactly. That’s exactly what I said. Oh wait, I’m not a complete moron.

    So which one is it?

    I am also asking if you think it’s acceptable for Mr. Lee to insist that Hyun be pronounced Hun, and if so what your reasoning is. I am drawing a blank, because I thought that the acceptable romanization of his name was Heon (and/or Hun except when this means Hoon. Yeesh.). The only other example I can think of where ‘Hyun’ is pronounced Hun is in Hyundai advertising, which brings me back to my first point.

  • bumfromkorea

    Think really hard about what I was saying. Then look at your question, loaded and cocked by also saying that foreigners who lives in Korea for long can pronounce it (No. Shit. Really? People who’ve been constantly exposed by the language in question can pronounce it correctly? Holy fuck, somebody call Associated Press.).

    ‘Considering that the best attempt I heard so far in person was “Hai Uhn
    Dahi” after being told how the pronunciation actually went, I’d say Hyundai thought correctly.’

    Do Hyundai also run English ads in Korea for the benefit of advertising their product to English-only speaking population of Korea (All less than 1 % of the population?)? How the fuck. Does what I wrote translates to “Foreigners cannot pronounce Hyundai, ever.”? How does ‘Americans I’ve met so far can’t pronounce it, and I think it’s reasonable for Hyundai to make that assumption when advertising in AMERICA.’ turns into ‘Whities can’t say Hyundai to save their lives, even those living in Korea.”? You turned my comment about American general population’s woeful awareness (or lack thereof) of the world outside their border into “God, Crackers are so stupid lol”. That, sir, is putting words into my mouth. For what purpose, I have no idea.

    I am also asking if you think it’s acceptable for Mr. Lee to insist that Hyun be pronounced Hun, and if so what your reasoning is.

    Yes. I think it’s reasonable for Mr. Lee to insist that the latter half of his first name be pronounced Hun. My reasoning is, THAT’S HIS FUCKING NAME. Google Lee Byung HYUN right now. See what result you get – Oh, that’s right. He spells it Lee Byung HUN, because the latter half of his first name is 헌 with ㅓ, not 현 with ㅕ.

  • bumfromkorea

    Ulterior motives? Say, what would be the common sense purpose served in hiring teachers who teach English?

    I’m going to take a wild guess and say that

    It’s about learning the language

  • wangkon936

    Well, Lee’s parents didn’t have much of a choice with “李 .” That’s the family name.

    I could imagine that 炳憲 may have been an attempt to say something like “glorious righteousness” or something to that effect when his parents were picking out his hanja characters. However, sometimes you don’t get a choice in the middle name. Sometimes each generation gets a hanja character that corresponds to the sexagenary cycle and a different hanja character gets assigned to each generation.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Why are you swearing at me? Please stop. Regarding Hyundai, I believe that if they used their own name correctly in English-language advertising that’s how honkies would say it. The decision to mangle the name is that of Hyundai, not the aforementioned honkies. This stems from what I believe is a condecscending marketing decision, based in the Korean belief that the Korean language is too difficult for non-Koreans to pronounce. Your views on how honkies say this word was expressed thusly:

    ‘Considering that the best attempt I heard so far in person was “Hai Uhn
    Dahi” after being told how the pronunciation actually went, I’d say Hyundai thought correctly.’

    This statement does not limit itself to Americans living in America who have never studied Korean, it smears all non-Korean speakers everywhere at all times as unable to say the word.

    As for whether or not Mr Lee spells his name Hyun or Hun, Google seems to say that he spells it both ways:

    http://24-7kpop.com/2012/08/19/confirmed-actress-lee-min-jung-actor-lee-byung-hyun-are-dating/

    http://video.xin.msn.com/watch/video/actor-lee-byung-hyun-celebrates-hollywood-handprints/2i0qynty6

    http://hallyu8.com/topic/32550-dispatch-lee-byung-hyun-lee-min-jung/

    This says to me that he, and his Korean fans, (and the Marmot!) think they can spell his name however they like in English and still brings me back to Hyundai ads wherein ‘Hyun’ =Hun. It’s pretty annoying.

  • bumfromkorea

    This statement does not limit itself to Americans living in America who have never studied Korean, it smears all non-Korean speakers everywhere at all times as unable to say the word.

    HORSE… Apple. The topic was the American ad campaigns in American media broadcast in American territories. Trying to twist my words into something that applies to all non-Korean speakers everywhere is the exact definition of shoving words into my mouth.

    As for whether or not Mr Lee spells his name Hyun or Hun, Google seems to say that he spells it both ways:

    Okay, now you’re just being intentionally obtuse.

    Here’s his Wikipedia page

    Here’s his Imdb page

    Here’s his official website

    Here’s his Fan site, apparently in hong kong

    Most importantly, when you google “Lee Byung Hyun”, google gives you “did you mean Lee Byung HUN?” as well as myriads of websites listing his name as Lee Byung HUN.

    This says to me that he, and his Korean fans, (and the Marmot!) think they can spell his name however they like in English and still brings me back to Hyundai ads wherein ‘Hyun’ =Hun. It’s pretty annoying.

    That conclusion that you made there tells me a lot of things about you.

  • bumfromkorea

    By the way, listing a bunch of English-language websites misspelling his name isn’t exactly the most convincing way of proving that

    he, and his Korean fans, (and the Marmot!) think they can spell his name however they like in English and still brings me back to Hyundai ads wherein ‘Hyun’ =Hun.

  • Bob Bobbs

    I wash my hands of it. I’m not a language teacher anymore.

  • Bob Bobbs

    Why are you engaging in personal attacks? I don’t know anything about you.

    Since when was the topic American ads? I never mentioned America at all, nor am I American.

    Doing a Google image search for ‘이병현’ also gives you a trillion images of Lee Byung Hun:

    https://www.google.ca/search?q=%EC%9D%B4%EB%B3%91%ED%98%84&hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=F1&tbo=u&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ei=ep8SUbWtCNDVqQHBuoDACQ&ved=0CDIQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=697

    Here he is, in Korean, as Hyun:

    http://rudol.net/3993

    Here:

    http://www.dcnews.in/news_list.php?code=ahh&id=426&curPage=&s_title=&s_body=&s_name=&s_que=&page=741

    Here:

    http://wing4u.pe.kr/2201

    Here:

    http://blog.naver.com/PostView.nhn?blogId=aa__mm&logNo=140103559418&redirect=Dlog&widgetTypeCall=true

    Here:

    http://www.worldcupmovie.com/bbs/board.php?bo_table=freeboard&wr_id=453

    And here he is listed as BOTH on the same page, also in Korean:

    http://blog.daum.net/shinek89/6

    There appears to be quite a bit of confusion as to just who this actor person is. There is also a rapper named Lee Byung Hyun, and some of these searches bring him up too, but it’s not just Anglos who get confused about what this dude’s name is. He’s clearly a North Korean spy and should be arrested under the National Security Law. This is all clearly the fault of the automobile manufacturer, Hundai. If Hyundai = Hundai in English (which does NOT mean only in America), I think that they should change their name in Korea to Hundai and insist that people pronounce it Hyundai. It seems to work for this actor whatever-his-name-is.

  • http://www.askakorean.net/ The_Korean

    This seriously is the most retarded conversation I have ever seen on MH. That’s quite a statement.

  • Bob Bobbs

    That’s discriminatory.

  • yangachibastardo

    So guys in your opinion what was Mr. Lee finest moment ? I’m undecided between J.S.A. and 악마를 보았다

  • Cloudfive

    Clap, clap, clap. Good for you Bob. Good for you. You know how to pronounce Hyundai the correct way and how dare they condescend to you.

    I bet you also know how to say Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Volkswagen correctly too. The German way. Yeah they pronounce their “Vs” like “F” and “W’s” like “V” but what are you gonna do? They’re Germans. Maybe you even go as far as saying “BMV” instead of “BMW”.

    I bet you order a mean “huevos rancheros”! Better than that bumfromkorea. I mean who is he? Nobody. I’d write to Hyundai USA headquarters if I were you, Bob.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maDhfb2915k

    **As for the romanization of Korean, I agree it’s flawed.

  • yangachibastardo

    Hey, Bob. Are you saying that Koreans are actually secret moon Nazis, and they’re planning to round up all the English teachers that they’ve been luring into their country and use them as experiment subjects for developing biological weapons…

    I’m listening to an old pop song called pensiero stupendo …it means beautiful thought

  • Bob Bobbs

    No, I don’t say those words correctly because I was aware of them in their bastardised form before I knew how to say them properly. I can’t really say the same about Hyundai, although I did ride around in an ’86 Pony for a while. And I only say BMV (more like Vay, not Vee) to Germans, because I don’t want to alienate people who don’t speak German. don’t speak Spanish because I don’t live in Los Estados Unidos, so I’m still pretty phonetic there.

    Hyundai are telling people to mispronounce their own name, which causes derision among Koreans when they hear honkies say it that way, but Volkswagen are increasingly pronouncing their name correctly in their ads. This won’t turn everyone in North America into German-speakers, but it does more for cross-cultural communication than Hyundai saying that the ‘Y’ in Hyundai is either silent or just isn’t there at all. That’s condescending.

    There are always flaws when you try to write one language in the alphabet of another, and I accept that, but this is an example of Koreans using the Roman alphabet to spell the name of one of their companies and then insisting that anglophones can neither read nor pronounce it correctly.

  • Bob Bobbs

    He’s an actor? Based on those photos I found, I thought he was in gay porn.

  • Cloudfive

    “Joint Security Area” was my first “good” Korean movie, so it has a special place in my heart.
    Other 이병헌 films I liked are “Everybody Has Secrets” a fun comedy from 2004 and “A Bittersweet Life” from 2005.

  • wangkon936

    Nah, you’re thinking of that Canadian Ryan Reynolds. It’s his poster that’s got to be adorning the walls of more gay bath houses than any other person combined.

  • yangachibastardo

    Wishful thinking can be tricky

  • Cloudfive

    Do they still have gay bath houses?

  • Bob Bobbs

    So I have the hots for Lee Byung Hyun/Hun/Heon/Hoon/Hyundai/Hundai/Hondai and you have the hots for some big, hairy Vancouverite. This re-examination of my sexuality wasn’t what I was expecting out of this conversation, but maybe this multiculturalism thing isn’t so bad. Ooh, those lips…

  • wangkon936

    C5,

    I really wouldn’t know.

  • wangkon936

    “This re-examination of my sexuality wasn’t what I was expecting out of this conversation…”

    Dude, you can’t blame anyone else but yourself for that one.

  • Jang

    He doesn’t like “retarded” people. As the “political” contributor a little “politically” correctness in English would be Nice!

  • bumfromkorea

    Oh, is that right? In which country were you talking about Hyundai changing the way the present the pronunciation, then? Korea? My initial point was that Americans I’ve met had seriously hard time pronouncing Hyundai, and that it was reasonable for the company to present themselves so that when people talk about their product, they don’t go “You know that car company? That… I don’t know how to pronounce it… ah, forget it”. You’re the one who reacted to that point by suddenly claiming that I think “honkies” can’t pronounce Korean words correctly, and strangely insisting that I think White people can’t pronounce Korean words, period.

    You know what? This is retarded. I’m done here.

  • bumfromkorea

    악마를 보았다, hands down. He was pretty good in 달콤한 인생 too.

    But my favorite performance of his is in Park Chan Wook’s short film “Cut”

  • will.i.aint

    bumfromkorea wrote:

    Most importantly, when you google “Lee Byung Hyun”, google gives you “did you mean Lee Byung HUN?” as well as myriads of websites listing his name as Lee Byung HUN.

    Yes, it does in fact say “Did you mean: 이병헌”

    But before you get to that “myriads of websites” that spell the name as 이병헌, there are five thumbnail images of the actor 이병헌 (but the associated text is spelled 이병현) and below those images is a youtube thumbnail for the actor 이병헌 (but the associated text is spelled 이병현), and below that are several hangul websites for the actor 이병헌 (but the associated text is spelled 이병현).

    You have to scroll down to the bottom of the page to before you see his name spelled as 이병헌.

  • yangachibastardo

    LOL it is pronounced 윤다이 here

  • yangachibastardo

    Everybody loves 달콤한 인생/bittersweet life, i didn’t like it that much. Yes it had great scenes for sure and it was nice for a change to see a (kinda) lighter hearted approach to the jopok genre but in the end the script seemed a bit feeble, including the final twist of the story and his acting seemed a bit more monotonous than usual.

  • Bob Bobbs

    But what about Mr. B.H. Lee? See my above post and will.i.ain’t’s post on this topic presenting solid, incontrovertible, empirically researched evidence that this man has multiple names, is probably a mole operating on a false passport, might be a gay porn star and even possibly a cyborg.