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Another Korean attacked in Australia, Yonhap decries gov’t, police response

Another Korean has been attacked in Australia.

According to Yonhap, a 28-year-old working holiday visa-holder by the name of Cho was beaten by two white youths in the Runcorn neighbohood of Brisbane just past midnight on Nov 25.

According to Cho, the kids approached him asking to borrow his photo to call their mother. He lent it to them, but then they tried to make off with it. They then mercilessly beat him around the head with fists and blunt objects, I’m guessing when he tried to stop them.

When they were about to attack him again, Cho screamed and adopted a counterattack posture, and the louts fled in a waiting car.

After getting treated by emergency personnel sent to the scene, Cho went to the police station to file a report.

Hojustani police, however, were insincere throughout their questioning, and even scolded Cho for being out late at night when it was dangerous. Or so Cho said.

Cho added that the cops even said Asians were “stupid” and “silly” for going out at night when it was dangerous.

Cho said the attack could have been racial since the Runcorn area has a lot of Asians, including Chinese.

Cho came to Australia in July of last year on a working holiday visa. He has been learning English while working in a meatpacking plant. There are about 30,000 Koreans on working holiday in Australia.

There’s been a spate of attacks on Koreans in Australia, with a guy in Melbourne getting his finger cut off during an attack by 10 white youths in September and a Korean office worker in Sydney getting attacked by four to five unknown assailants.

Not sure if the protest photo in the Yonhap story is related to the attacks or not. What we do know, though, is Yonhap is not very happy about this all, because they also penned a piece on how the Australian government and police were coming under fire for trying to minimize or cover up the rash of racist crimes targeting Asians and other foreigners in Australia.

According to Yonhap, Hojustani authorities are worried that if these attacks become known internationally, it could have a negative impact on two of Australia’s big three industries—education and tourism. Some are pointing out, however, that attempts to hush up the incidents without presenting fundamental solutions means a solution to the problem is far off.

According to the Australian press and Asian foreign student community on Nov 26, Australia had a tough time after the attacks on Indian students in Melbourne three years ago, with the number of Indian students dropping by 70%, but the situation has yet to improve.

At the time, the Indian government and press slammed the attitude of the Australian cops for being insincere in their investigations, with Australia eventually recalling their ambassador, but the Australian authorities insisted the attacks were mere muggings, not racist attacks.

The same went for the attacks on the Chinese students in Sydney in April. Despite the white attackers using racial insults and mercilessly beating the two Chinese students, the Australian authorities simply called it “an attack that could happen in any country.”

Even pro-Chinese (Yonhap’s words, not mine) Hoju PM Kevin Rudd called it a “teenage crime that could happen in any country.”

The authorities are making the same mistakes with the attack on the Korean in Melbourne. Despite the victim reporting it as a racist attack, Victoria police did not charge the assailants with whatever Hojustan calls “hate crimes.” Instead, they called it a common teenage crime.

Police apologized to the victim and promised to re-investigate when suspicions were raised that the cops didn’t really investigate and inquires were made by Korean diplomats, but police still haven’t departed from their view that the attack was not racial in nature.

In 1995, the Australian government passed the “Racial Hatred Act” making it a crime to disparage people on the basis of race or national origin, but police almost never use it.

In fact, some point out that the law has been rendered powerless, with Victoria police using it to indict three men for attacking an Indian in 2010, only to drop the indictment one year later for doubtful reasons (Yonhap’s words, not mine).

Kim Hyeong-tae (22, fake name), the former vice chairman of the Korean Students Association of the University of Sydney, said among Asian foreign students, there is widespread belief that it’s no use telling the Australian cops that you suffered a racial attack.

An employee of one major Korean company who has suffered racist insults several times during his three years working in Australia said to Australia, which earned notoriety for its past White Australia policies, racial discrimination is a kind of weakness and Achilles’s Heal. Australians are reacting sensitively because this weak spot is being touched, he said.

Marmot’s Hole: OK, Hojustanis, what the hell is going on here? And since when did the Brisbane suburbs become A Clockwork Orange?

PS: Just to show that God does indeed have a sense of humor, MBC—yes, that MBC (and this one)—ran the Yonhap piece on their homepage.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • H.Schmidt

    Well what do you expect from Australia? It’s one of the most racist countries in the world.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Hoju saram,

    What’s the word on the street bro?

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    @1 they are just like you: no one but pureblooded can be accepted. The HORROR if someone isn’t from the same race/ethnicity/culture and even worse if, GASP, they are of mixed parentage.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Well what do you expect from Australia? It’s one of the most racist countries in the world.

    Actually, Schmidt, it’s the least racist, alongside Canada, if you believe data and polls and stuff.

    Wangkon – word on the street is a kid got beaten up by thugs in a poor, crime-ridden city suburb late at night.

    Maybe I missed something – but where’s the racist element?

    As for Cho’s comment that “the cops even said Asians were “stupid” and “silly” for going out at night when it was dangerous” – sorry, I don’t buy it. My guess is the real message from the cops, prior to being filtered by Cho and Yonhap, was that it’s stupid wandering around with a brand new cell phone in Runcorn at 1am. I would have told him the same thing.

    Incredible that a mugging gets a run in the international news as some sort of racist hate crime indicative of a national culture.

  • αβγδε

    I don’t think this ought to be a “Australia is so racist” issue. It’s more like a “Why is Australia such a fucking ghetto” issue. Because racism ideologically and culturally is one thing. But on the level of uncouth morons targetting others because of racial difference, that’s just something that happens because the people are trash and because they’re poor. That must be the state of Australia where these incidents happen. Trashy people living in poor conditions. You’ll see it anywhere in any ghetto where human nature isn’t padded with basic comforts and supported by education.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    To add some more context, there are now 60,000 Koreans living in Hoju. If we’re going to start screaming racism every time one of them gets mugged, it’s going to be a long, long summer.

  • babotaengi

    I’m guessing the young hoods are just seeing Asians as easy targets. No doubt such bottom-feeding scumbags possess a racist streak, but I’m guessing the desire to hurt/rob some poor sap is the real motivation here.

    As a white Australian, I’ve been targeted myself on numerous occasions while out late on weekends. Never for a mugging; just some gutless, half-cut cunts looking to beat some poor sap up. I generally stand my ground during such encounters, but I can’t say that is a well advised response. I’m sure if one were to hot-foot it they would quickly give up the chase feeling nearly as self-satisfied as if they’d beaten you into submission.

    Pro-tip: if you’re being chased by a half-dozen Lebos looking to mash your face up, start jumping backyard fences. No one wants to get their hands all cut up scaling shit in the dark just for a cheap adrenaline rush.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    It’s more like a “Why is Australia such a fucking ghetto” issue.

    Yeah, a “fucking ghetto” with the highest living standards in the world.

    Having said that Australia, like every country in the world, has shitty suburbs with ignorant people in them. Rincon is a backward suburb in a backward state. I expect there are similar places in, for example, Alabama and Arizona, and I also expect there are similar examples of crimes against non-whites in most countries, racially motivated or otherwise. It’s really not that noteworthy in a nation of 25 million people.

    Once again, how this kid getting beaten up for his cell phone equates to Australia being “a fucking ghetto” or “the most racist country in the world” is beyond me.

  • Oneforall

    @ #1

    Pretty ironic coming from you! XD

  • bumfromkorea

    What?! You mean a bunch of assholes who have no qualms about beating and robbing a complete stranger is ignorant enough to be racists?!

    Holy fuck.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/shocking Jakgani

    I completely agree with Hoju.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    One last point (which I don’t really don’t want to labour), but I do feel like I’m entering an irony-free zone when I hear Koreans lambasting Australians for being intolerant.

    And I really have a chuckle when the 40-year-dead-wasn’t-even-an-actual-policy “White Australia Policy” is dragged out for show, particularly when it never even comes close to the levels of racism in the current Korean immigration regime.

  • αβγδε

    hoju,

    Don’t mistake my impunity for trashy people in Australia for anything but that, Don’t shoot yourself in the foot there, with respect to my defense of Australia. How do you account for the trash in this recently popular video online:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hp6J6PF47CM

    You’re saying these xenophobic morons are not ghetto and are living comfortable lives? If so, then there’s something wrong with Australia indeed.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    “To add some more context, there are now 60,000 Koreans living in Hoju. If we’re going to start screaming racism every time one of them gets mugged, it’s going to be a long, long summer.”

    Well, how many of a population of 60,000 people do you think it’s normal to get mugged by strangers in one year? My county has a little more than that and I would imagine there have hardly been any muggings, ever. So, you can imagine what Korean readers would think when they hear about the second such incident within a month.

    I do think it’s a case of easy targets more than racism, but it also shows that Australian police can’t keep their streets safe or control juveniles, which visitors do have a right to be concerned about.

  • αβγδε

    impunity -> impugnment.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    αβγδε,

    Of course they’re ghetto, and of course they’re trash. What country doesn’t have this sort of scum? My issue is when you write:

    It’s more like a “Why is Australia such a fucking ghetto” issue.

    Australia is one of the most multicultural countries in the world, with Melbourne and Sydney two of the most multicultural cities. Ethnic minorities and non-Anglo immigrants number in the millions. Hardly surprising that there are occasions of racism in such a diverse country. What you need to do, αβγδε, is visit the country before you start making outrageous generalisations about an entire nation on the basis of a few incidents.

  • http://www.expathell.com thankswww

    I don’t think the attackers are specifically seeking out Koreans and beating them. Rather, I think it’s a matter of “things that are normal and safe in Korea, aren’t normal and safe in all other parts of the world.” There are tons of places in California, New York, Chicago, Florida, London, etc. where no sane person walks around alone at 1am. In Korea, it’s perfectly ok (unless maybe you are a woman) to walk around alone at night.

    Decrying Australian racism and trying to address the problem from that angle isn’t going to solve much. Rather, perhaps educating Koreans and other Asians about what is and isn’t safe would yield greater results.

    Travel Hint # 1: Just because the area is full of white people, doesn’t mean that it is safe to walk around at 1am, alone.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Well, how many of a population of 60,000 people do you think it’s normal to get mugged by strangers in one year? My county has a little more than that and I would imagine there have hardly been any muggings, ever.

    What??

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    What’s your suburb, Yu Bum Suk? I’m very curious.

  • αβγδε

    Nobody – not me- made a fucking generalization. You just need to stop getting your Captain Hoju panties in a bunch. ;)

  • Yu Bum Suk

    16, no, I mean my county in Korea.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    Sorry I meant 19.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Nobody – not me- made a fucking generalization.

    Ok αβγδε, maybe I misunderstood you. But this -

    It’s more like a “Why is Australia such a fucking ghetto” issue

    - struck me as a generalisation. Call me crazy.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Yu Bum Suk, understood. I’d still be curious to know what the suburb is. And if the 60,000 people in your good neighbourhood haven’t suffered a single mugging in the last year, (let alone “ever”), I’ll eat my own undies.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    I’m in the southeast, and it’s a pretty rural “neighbourhood”. I’m sure there’s probably been a mugging somewhere, some time (probably teenager-on-teenager), but it’s the last place anyone would think twice about using an expensive phone at night. Hence, you can understand why people here who read about these cases would wonder what the hell’s wrong with Australia and why (possibly rather naive) Koreans are being targetted.

  • Baek-du boy

    “An employee of one major Korean company who has suffered racist insults several times during his three years working in Australia said to Australia, which earned notoriety for its past White Australia policies, racial discrimination is a kind of weakness and Achilles’s Heal”

    Don’t actually get this…but as an (Australian) employee of a major American company in Korea, I suffered direct racial discrimination every day of my Korean life. I couldn’t get the same ATM/bank service as Koreans, I couldn’t get the same phone service as locals, I couldn’t shop online or book movies/transport with out local citizen number…list goes on and perhaps this has changed now. I just got on with my life without enjoyed it without complaining and trying to create a diplomatic bruhaha.

    Sorry to turn this back to Korea, as overall I loved living there. I just love the way an employee at a ‘major Korean company’ gets a quote (that doesn’t make sense).

    If Australia is such a racist and bad place, why are 60,000 Korean’s living/visiting here? As I said the last time this post came up. None of my Korean or other Asian friends have ever complained to me about any racial problems living here. Even when I’ve asked them.

    Whenever you are in a foreign country albeit any race, don’t do things locals usually wouldn’t do. Cavorting around rough suburbs in the middle of the night is one such thing many locals here know not to do.
    Shame, as Brisbane is really nice with few rough suburbs unlike some suburbs in Sydney.

    Australia today has a rich cultural diversity and I’m proud of it (being an immigrant myself!)

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    My other sister is currently engaged to a hoju saram. She said that Australia (especially Sidney) is sunny and diverse like California, but people talk funny and the toilets twirl the other way… ;)

  • Baek-du boy

    I’ve also lived in Dublin. Once when walking in a rough suburb (near Ballymun) with a Korean mate, a bunch of teenagers came up and squinted their eyes and started yelling ‘ko ni chi wa ” and other mocking sounds. My buddy laughed, but I was pissed off and chased after them.

    That is an example of youth being ignorant and racist. A random mugging is not.

  • Baek-du boy
  • Wedge

    One noteworthy bit in the story is that the Oz hate crime law is rarely enforced. Good. Save the hate crimes for the Thought Police. A mugging is a mugging, and whoever did it should be prosecuted on that basis, regardless of motivation.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    …and if the mugging is ancillary to the hate crime?

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    I’m in the southeast, and it’s a pretty rural “neighbourhood”. I’m sure there’s probably been a mugging somewhere, some time (probably teenager-on-teenager), but it’s the last place anyone would think twice about using an expensive phone at night. Hence, you can understand why people here who read about these cases would wonder what the hell’s wrong with Australia and why (possibly rather naive) Koreans are being targetted.

    Guess what? I grew up in a rural Australian neighbourhood and wandered around at night without a worry too. This is a poor, crime-ridden city neighbourhood at 1am in the morning.

    One one occasion in Korea, my good friend was assaulted and kicked repeatedly in the head while he was lying on the ground. He had a brain haemorrhage and almost died. It happened late at night in an inner-city suburb of Gwangju. I’m pretty sure, judging by the way the mob was chanting Day Han Minguk whilst they attacked him, that it wasn’t exactly a random assault.

    Oddly, I didn’t wonder what the hell was wrong with Korea after this happened. My own experience in Korea was really good, and I generally felt very safe. But let’s not pretend the ROK doesn’t have occasional issues of violence and/or racially motivated crime.

    As for your suggestion that Koreans are being specifically targeted – gimme a break.

  • Baek-du boy

    hoju-saram, I’d hardly call Brisbane a crime ridden city. Admittedly Runcorn isn’t exactly the nicest place in SE Queensland.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Baek-du,

    I meant crime-ridden suburb. I actually live in SE QLD and had to look up where it is – soon as I saw Springwood and Logan I knew what the deal was.

    I actually just looked up Runcorn then – here are some fun facts for digesting:

    1. 53% of people in Runcorn were born overseas.
    2. Only 60% of people in Runcorn have finished High School.
    3. It’s in the top 10 suburbs in QLD for home break-ins and assault.

    Lovely place to be wandering around at 1am in the morning then.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Baek-du boy: I just read the story you linked to. Holy fucking shit. Read this letter by an Aussie, too:

    http://www.australiantimes.co.uk/news/opinion/is-being-called-australian-a-racist-slur-one-uk-court-says-yes.htm

  • cm

    “My guess is the real message from the cops, prior to being filtered by Cho and Yonhap, was that it’s stupid wandering around with a brand new cell phone in Runcorn at 1am. I would have told him the same thing.”

    Then why police bring up “Asians” into this equation? If it was a stupid thing to do to walk around the street at night, being Asians has nothing to do with being stupid. At any rate, it sounds like Australia is full of crime waves involving street muggings against visible minorities (this is not just about Koreans) as easy targets. Instead of focusing on racism issue, the Korean papers really should be questioning the wisdom of Korean government for not issuing a travel warning to Korean students and tourists to be careful of going to Australia.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Anonymou_Joe,

    if the mugging is ancillary to an assualt or murder, you mean? As a libertaruian you should be firmly against the concept of hate crimes. Crimes are crimes, if its murder then its the same no matter what the motive was. Hate crimes are thought crimes, and it can lead to situation where no crime has been committed yet a person is charged: for example in Korea people wanted the man who cursed out the Indian individual to be charged with a crime. Is cursing someone out a crime in itself? Yet suddenly it becomes when when its a “race crime.”

  • Baek-du boy

    #35 A Kiwi family member of mine jokingly said they should have put her in jail and thrown away the key for such a slur, rather than a 110 pound fine.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Then why police bring up “Asians” into this equation? If it was a stupid thing to do to walk around the street at night, being Asians has nothing to do with being stupid.

    My whole point was that they may not have said anything of the sort.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Instead of focusing on racism issue, the Korean papers really should be questioning the wisdom of Korean government for not issuing a travel warning to Korean students and tourists to be careful of going to Australia.

    There are 30,000 Koreans visiting Australia every year on working holiday visas, and 60,000 Koreans living permanently in Oz. If you want to issue a warning to 90,000 Koreans on the basis of two assaults, you better issue travel warnings about every fucking country in the entire world.

    Following this logic, should Australia issue a warning to all citizens about the dangers of visiting murderous Koreans?

    Bonus round: did Yonhap run a story on the fellow above? Or are muggers of Korean teens in Australia more newsworthy than Korean murderers in Australia?

  • cm

    #40, but it’s not just two Koreans in the news. Actually there were three Koreans within just the last few weeks, who were attacked, if I recall correctly.. but who’s really counting. It’s the spate of reports by visible minorities that they were victims of muggings, which is the disturbing part. If there’s smoke, then there fire, because none of the other Anglo countries like Canada, USA, Britain, have similar number of case being reported. So the visible minorities in Australia are the only ones whining about being mugged in Australia? What gives?

  • iMe

    Hoju Saram wrote:
    “I expect there are similar places in, for example, Alabama and Arizona…”

    You left out California, mate. No one can top our home-grown morons. No one.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Actually there were three Koreans within just the last few weeks, who were attacked, if I recall correctly.. but who’s really counting. It’s the spate of reports by visible minorities that they were victims of muggings, which is the disturbing part. If there’s smoke, then there fire, because none of the other Anglo countries like Canada, USA, Britain, have similar number of case being reported.

    Three? I only recall two, but who’s counting?

    I think the key here is “being reported” – because Canada, the US and Britain sure as hell have similar numbers of cases. And if you think Britain is less racist than Australia you’re completely nuts.

    The two muggings in question weren’t reported in Australia because they were, well, muggings, which aren’t exactly rare occurrences in the west. Why Yonhap is in a frenzy is anyone’s guess.

    If you seriously think 2 muggings from a pool of 90,000 Koreans is disturbing, you may be clinically disturbed. My guess is that Koreans in LA, for example, fall victim to muggings every other day. I could be wrong of course, and I’ll defer to Wangkon’s opinion on this one.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    #43 should have had the 1st par blockquoted

  • bumfromkorea

    When I was in LA for 8 days a few weeks back, there were about 10 muggings, robbery, and various other scary violent crime against Koreans/Korean Americans within 2 mile radius of where I was staying. Now, I dunno how big this Runcorn is, but I’m going to go ahead and guess that its bigger than 4*pi miles sq.

  • hamel

    1) these pretzels are making me thirsty

    2) “H. Schmidt” – haha! your 위선 is showing, 튀기.

    3) #11 @ Jakassni: very piss-poor effort at shitstirring, mate.

  • DynamicallySparkling

    I love it how a few Koreans get a bit roughed up in some bad neighborhoods and the Koreans are up in arms about being targeted racially (How about some shock reports on the foreigners that are racially targeted in Korea?). Seriously, Korean media needs to pick up it’s game and not rely on word of mouth to report it’s stories. If what the police officer said was true ( and importantly, racially based) then our poor little victim, Mr Cho, should file a complaint against that officer.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    I think the difference is that 33% of the Koreans / KoAms in LA aren’t there on working holidays. When Koreans get mugged in LA it’s perhaps shocking but not surprising to them. If they don’t speak English perfectly they know someone who does and there are Korean-speaking police officers. Those most at risk, namely shopkeepers, know the risks and are often armed, so there’s not the same feeling of helplessness. I think that’s why the press has ended up making such a big deal over these incidents.

  • Baek-du boy

    Sometimes I miss my Kiwi roots. No one picks on NZ (perhaps too insignificant).

    I know in NZ some Maori bros have gone up to a few Koreans (and other Asians) and said “hey cuzzie bro, guv us your wallit n iphone eh? Chooice!” – is that a racial attack?, or are they just going for an easy target?

    Am I being racist saying it would be Maori’, it could just as easily be pacific islanders or white dudes with Maori tattoos there.

  • Baek-du boy

    #48 Yu Bum suk is on the right track. It’s due to the high numbers of working holiday visa Koreans that some are finding themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time in Australia.

    Perhaps the Korean media might like to focus on the vast number of these working holiday visa travellers working illegally here, taking jobs under the table, living in illegal environments (10+ ppl in 2 bdrm apartments). Although the media have focused somewhat on the prostitution. Not so much the gang members entering on another person’s passport.

    I personally feel it’s Australia’s responsibility to provide affordable housing, create an easier working/tax system so Koreans aren’t working for $8-10 per hour (mostly employed by other Koreans, Korean/Australians) and not getting holidays / overtime payed. Many working holiday visa travellers don’t have any alternative than to work illegally and fill up inner city apartments with four people per room and bunks in living rooms.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Baek-du and Robert – I quite liked the NZ Herald’s take on the matter, which has been gleefully sent to me by all my kiwi friends on facebook.

    The only thing stopping Kiwis sewing their flag on their backpacks is the fact that they copied ours and it looks almost identical.

  • Todd M

    #43 Hoju saram wrote:
    “I think the key here is “being reported” – because Canada, the US and Britain sure as hell have similar numbers of cases.”

    Not so sure, but each country may interpret ‘hate crime’ somewhat differently.

    According to Statistics Canada, there were 1,401 hate crimes in 2010.
    http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11635-eng.htm

    According to the British Home Office, there were 43,748 hate crimes recorded by police in 2011/12.
    http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/crime-research/hate-crimes-1112/hate-crimes-1112

    Unfortunately, I could not easily find statistics for hate crimes on the Australian Government site, at least in my cursory search. Perhaps someone else could find such for a comparative study.
    http://www.aic.gov.au/statistics.html

    In America, the FBI site reports that “6,628 criminal incidents involving 7,699 offenses were reported in 2010 as a result of bias toward a particular race, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity/national origin, or physical or mental disability.”

    According to this 2012.04.26 article http://www.police.ac.kr/journal/down/down_view.jsp?idx=291
    Korea does not classify ‘hate crime’ yet. Does anyone know if this is true still? Perhaps Yonhap could decry this.

    BTW, in Canada, according to the General Social Survey on Victimization (2009), statistics likely undercount hate crime. Only about one third of those which were perceived to be racially motivated are suspected of being reported. Interestingly, “similar proportions of hate crimes were committed against East and Southeast Asians (including Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese groups) and Caucasians, at 6% and 5%, respectively.”

  • http://bensmatrix.info ElCanguro

    Meanwhile, these attacks have reached Australian media. FWIW I never thought Runcorn was that bad, sure not the nicest place in Brisbane but nearby Sunnybank is grouse with the food courts. My gf works at a high school in an adjoining suburb, very multicultural area. Been to a couple of school events, all kids seem quite harmonious, couldn’t sense any overt tensions among the students. http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/australias-safety-questioned-after-three-attacks-on-south-koreans-20121127-2a5b0.html#ixzz2DOyIAc3N

  • 37degrees

    Well, yes, there have been three Aus attacks by the looks of things: http://www.theage.com.au/national/australias-safety-questioned-after-three-attacks-on-south-koreans-20121127-2a5b0.html

    The incident previously mentioned here (guy loses finger) did happen (first I’ve heard of it). In fact in happened in a local neighborhood I know very well. Two things regarding the Melbourne (Box Hill) report: 1. (and not wanting to trivialise a nasty incident), but the 33 year old Korean man was attacked by a 14 year old boy (as in, a young boy) or boys – he couldn’t defend himself against a spotty youngster? Not that he should be in that situation anyway, but… The attacker was charged the next day too.

    2. The Korean guy must have been very unlucky to be attacked by the only white people in the suburb (joke). Box Hill has a very high percentage of Asian people in its population. (It’s also home to one of my favourite dumpling restaurants too).

  • platethief

    Mugging is a traditional Western custom that dates back as far as Aistotle and Plato. I think this guy should show more respect for thecustoms of his host nation, or at least try to understand them instead of simply claiming racism every time he has a cultural misunderstanding.

  • babotaengi

    Heheheh.

  • Maximus2008

    Where’s pawi!?!? Can’t wait for his comment:

    “does it hurt, white boy? so if it is racist crime in Korea everybody gets upset and angry and call Koreans racists, but if it happens in WhiteLand it is normal ? take that, snow white! and psy will be man of the year on Time magazine! How’s that caucasian friends, huh, huh?”

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/shocking Jakgani

    What Australian newspapers are saying:

    Three recent attacks on foreign nationals in Australia have caused widespread outrage in South Korea, with media organisations questioning whether Australia was a safe place to visit.

    A 33-year-old South Korean student had his little finger chopped off and left arm broken in a brutal attack by a group of teenagers in Melbourne in late September.

    Another 33-year-old South Korean man was assaulted in Sydney by a group of four or five people in October.

    And on Sunday, a 27-year-old South Korean was punched in the head by two men trying to steal his mobile phone in Brisbane, the Yonhap news agency reported.

    Advertisement
    In the Melbourne attack, the victim, who gave his name as Mr Chang, approached the South Korean consulate in Melbourne for assistance this month after being dissatisfied by the police inquiries.

    Victoria Police is continuing its investigations after the South Korean government requested they conduct a “more thorough and fair investigation”, capture the perpetrators and compensate the victim.

    The Foreign Ministry of South Korea also demanded Australia “come up with measures to prevent future incidents”, the Korean broadcaster KBS reported earlier this month.

    Korean media organisations have also labelled the initial investigation as “inadequate and unfair”, and posed questions about police conduct and possible “cover-ups”.

    The victim, a Box Hill resident, has been studying at a Melbourne technical school since July on a six-month visa. The assault occurred at a park on Irving Street, Box Hill, at night.

    The Korean newspaper Chosun Ilbo reported Mr Chang was approached by a group of teenagers who asked for a cigarette. When he refused, they assaulted him while shouting the words “f—ing Chinese”.

    Mr Chang blacked out during the attack and was taken to hospital, where his little finger was reattached.

    The newspaper also said Mr Chang accused the police of “brushing off the assault simply as rowdy teenage behaviour” and “refused to inform him of the identities of the other teens”. Mr Chang believes it was a racially motivated attack.

    Fairfax Media can reveal a 14-year-old boy from Doncaster, Melbourne, was charged the day after the assault.

    But last week, the news agency Yonhap reported that Victoria Police had replaced the original officers of the investigation team and offered an apology for the “insufficient initial probe”.

    Korean media reports have fuelled concerns about whether Australia was a safe destination for students and holidaymakers.

    The Sydney attack victim, Mr Kim, told the Korea Herald he was struck with a golf club and ended up with skull fractures and two broken ribs.

    In the Queensland incident, a man who gave his name as Mr Cho accused Queensland police officers of discrimination when reporting the attack.

    “They made defamatory remarks, saying Asians are stupid and silly,” he claimed.

    In Korea, if the “teenagers” doing the muggings and and beatings were Korean teenagers, this is what Koreans would be saying…….

    “They’re just children…. they’ll say sorry”.

  • R. Elgin

    If someone goes to a new locale and does not know how to spot bad situations, does not know the neighborhood and gives off the non-verbal “I don’t know where I am”, they are at risk for mischief or crime. This sort of thing can also happen anywhere in the world. I would think that such a scenario is unlikely to happen in South Korea though.

  • hamel

    Jakassni at his finest (#58):

    In Korea, if the “teenagers” doing the muggings and and beatings were Korean teenagers, this is what Koreans would be saying…….

    “They’re just children…. they’ll say sorry”.

    Hey, great shitstir, mate. I reckon you’ll really drive ‘em crazy with that one!

  • paulhewson

    Oooops. I just put this on some other thread. Something about a bus strike. Sorry.

    Anyways. Here goes again.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvu0Bm2kQFc

  • paulhewson
  • Bendrix

    I agree with the ‘Asians are an easy target’ angle. Asians are seen as physically weak and easy to rob, probably everywhere outside of Asia. I don’t think there was an ideology of racial supremacy behind these attacks. There was an article recently that listed crime statistics in urban areas, and Asians were disproportionately targeted. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CDMQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sfgate.com%2Fbayarea%2Fnevius%2Farticle%2FDirty-secret-of-black-on-Asian-violence-is-out-3265760.php&ei=kt20UNXtEcup0AXc2YHABw&usg=AFQjCNHVJ50U5pAFkD4LwR50owkLYsnXsA&sig2=E-bFI7vR-aj7Ftynl_r0-w

    So, if you’re Asian and in a sketchy area, be extra vigilant. Walk straight, with purpose, and don’t look around like you’re nervous. And be ready to either give your stuff up quickly, or fight back. The appropriate response depends on the circumstances, I think.

  • Bendrix

    Here’s another one about the situation in Philadelphia: http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=ba9_1337727984

  • paulhewson

    DISCLAIMER!!!

    I like Nemo. I think he is a clown fish. I think he lives in some anemone somewhere in the Great Barrier Reef. That’s Australia, mate.

    I also like Hugh Jackman. You know!!! Wolverine. Also very good in Swordfish and other random movies.

    I hate Rupert Murcock. The day that phone-hacking, neo-Nazi dies is the day I smoke a big fatty and it has been more that fifteen years so that will prove quite the day.

    But I do like Nicole Kidman although I think she was born in Hawaii so if she runs for president of America I am NOT voting for that Islamic bitch!!!! Yeah, man. Birthers!

    Although she is one hot piece of Aussie ass! Or was. Right, Tom? She’s getting kinda old. But of course I’m 44 so what the hell am I being so picky about it?

    Which reminds me. Did you ever notice that a woman is so much more attractive with your **** in her mouth. She is ten years younger and Venus ****ing De Milo. Oh Christ! Did I just write that????? The wife is coming through the front door with the son!!!
    Oh, God…. Oh, God….

    Delete! Delete! Delete!

    Don’t push Submit! Don’t push Submit! For the love of ****ing Jesus don’t push……..

  • paulhewson

    Come to think of it, I think Mel was born in New York.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    I don’t know that the attack was racially motivated either. From RK’s blog post:

    “When they were about to attack him again, Cho screamed and adopted a counterattack posture, and the louts fled in a waiting car.”

    Was the waiting car waiting for the hooligans waiting for an Asian passerby?

  • MrMao

    Uh- huh. Becauase the Korean police are ceaseless defenders of the rights of foreigners to walk on the streets of Korea unharmed. Because they have such a fantastic record of not murdering the people they hold in custody. Because racism is acknowledged as even existing at all by the majority of Korean society. Because foreigners are never insulted on the street or attacked if they protest against the racial abuse directed against them by Koreans. Because Koreans never gang-rape Western women or break into their apartments and rape them. Because Koreans never rape children in their care, but all Western teachers are pedophiles you must distrust. Uh huh.

  • rowan

    As an Aussie i can confirm that:
    *We are a country full of bogans,
    *We are actually one of the richest countries in the world (through both good management and a lot of luck)
    *Runcorn is not the best suburb, however i think Melbourne/Victoria would be far worse (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-11-22/police-investigate-racist-taunts-on-melbourne-bus/4385788)
    *There was a lot of media coverage of the attacks on indians, however if you look at the stats indians are under represented as victims of crime, and although not that one story defines the whole story there was one case where an indian claimed he was brutally beaten and set on fire, but after police investigated it turned out he was actually trying to torch his car for insurance and accidentally set himself on fire.
    *I would certainly believe that some racial abuse might be yelled from a passing car (or even face to face) but this does sound more like a case of wanting to steal the phone of the first potential victim they could find rather than a racial attack.
    * I think the difference between Korean and Aussie racism, is that Korean racism is still embedded in the countries legal and administrative system rather than people. Essentially Korea has a more racist system and australia has more racist people.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/shocking Jakgani

    “They’re just children…. they’ll say sorry”.

    Hey, great shitstir, mate. I reckon you’ll really drive ‘em crazy with that one!

    Hamel, you realize by continually typing your insults, you are typing more SH1T than anyone else.

    you are not typing anything interesting or constructive…

    problems with the wife?

    you’ve become the Holes new BS’er

  • hamel

    rowan:

    I think the difference between Korean and Aussie racism, is that Korean racism is still embedded in the countries legal and administrative system rather than people. Essentially Korea has a more racist system and australia has more racist people.

    You’re right on the money. Korea has institutional race/nationality-based discrimination, whereas Australia (and other western countries) have sought to stamp that out, leaving behind individual or personal racism.

    Regarding the first attack in Melbourne, I said in an earlier comment thread that these kind of attacks (someone asks you for a cigarette and then rolls you for money) are not uncommon, and Asians are by no means the only targets. In this case the Korean was unlucky enough to end up in the hands of a mob, and they hurled a racial epithet at him. But that doesn’t mean the attack was inspired by race. That’s incidental.

  • hamel

    Robert Koehler:

    The authorities are making the same mistakes with the attack on the Korean in Melbourne. Despite the victim reporting it as a racist attack, Victoria police did not charge the assailants with whatever Hojustan calls “hate crimes.” Instead, they called it a common teenage crime.

    What do you have against “hate crime” laws, Robert?

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    I didn’t express an opinion about “hate crimes” one way of the other in that selection, Hamel. It’s just that I don’t know what your peeps call what we Migukistanis call “hate crimes,” and I was too lazy to Google it.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    #69 rowan: I think the difference between Korean and Aussie racism, is that Korean racism is still embedded in the countries legal and administrative system rather than people. Essentially Korea has a more racist system and australia has more racist people.

    I’ve written on this (well, the Korean not the Aussie side of it) before.

    Korea most likely (see for the sake of accommodating rare instances, I’m moderating my statements to the detriment and weakening of my point) has as a whole more racist people. Aussie’s racists are the last bastions and protectors of the old guard. Like trapped animals, they’ve taken matters, as if their lives were at stake (which in a way they are), into their own hands and struck back. A more extreme example from history is the KKK, which was born in the South’s defeat in 1865 and found renewed vigor in the 1920′s and 1950′s, times of significant civil rights advances.

    Korea’s racism is institutionalized, coddled and protected by law, and requires no grand individual actions.

  • hamel

    Koehler: way to dodge a bullet there.

    Anonymous_Joe:

    Korea most likely (see for the sake of accommodating rare instances, I’m moderating my statements to the detriment and weakening of my point) has as a whole more racist people.

    So if you were moderating your real belief there, I must assume you believe Korea definitely has a lot more racist people as a whole. And that is where I disagree with you. But I guess it all comes down to what one means by “racism”. If you mean a racism that expresses itself in actual outward acts perpetrated on foreigners, then I think Australia would have the numbers there. If you mean a racism that is expressed through passive attitudes of suspicion towards foreigners, then Korea is the winner.

  • Baek-du boy

    In top section of SMH news website today

    http://www.smh.com.au/national/i-feel-so-embarrassed-and-humiliated-korean-attack-victim-accuses-police-20121128-2aczj.html

    Thing I don’t get is….the guy says he is left handed? Haven’t met many (any) left handed Koreans – Gyopo aside.

  • dogbertt

    Thing I don’t get is….the guy says he is left handed? Haven’t met many (any) left handed Koreans – Gyopo aside.

    Are you for real?

  • dogbertt

    nearby Sunnybank is grouse with the food courts

    Could someone please translate this into English?

  • Anonymous_Joe

    #75 hamel: So if you were moderating your real belief there,….

    Not so much tempering my real belief as not willing to use the words “all”, “always”, and “every” because other posters jump all (oops) over those words when it comes to Korea.

    …I must assume you believe Korea definitely has a lot more racist people as a whole. And that is where I disagree with you. But I guess it all comes down to what one means by “racism”. If you mean a racism that expresses itself in actual outward acts perpetrated on foreigners, then I think Australia would have the numbers there. If you mean a racism that is expressed through passive attitudes of suspicion towards foreigners, then Korea is the winner.

    Bingo. Foreigners need not fear losing fingers in Korea but stand no chance in their courts, with their legal protections, in law.

    In short, I think Aussie racists are smaller in number but more demonstrative; Korean racists are larger in number and more pervasive in their influence.

  • babotaengi

    “grouse” = bogan for “awesome”

  • hamel

    In short, I think Aussie racists are smaller in number but more demonstrative; Korean racists are larger in number and more pervasive in their influence.

    I think that Aussie (and other Western) racists are so because of actively held beliefs, whereas I think that Korean institutional race-based discrimination is a default position for most non-immigrant societies. As they change, so will the laws. This status quo is a temporary situation. Talk to people who have been here 30+ years; things have improved. Before 1998 it was not legally allowed for most foreigners to own property in Korea; now it is.

    Of course, as the situation changes and Korea becomes a nation that accepts immigrants, you might find that “Western-style” racists will propagate.

    In sum: I don’t see this as being a particularly Korean phenomenon – it’s simply a human one.

  • cm

    #79
    “Foreigners need not fear losing fingers in Korea but stand no chance in their courts, with their legal protections, in law. ”

    Any lawyers practicing in Korea here? Is this really true foreigners accused of crime or foreign victims have no chance of winning in Korean courts?

  • hamel

    Any lawyers practicing in Korea here? Is this really true foreigners accused of crime or foreign victims have no chance of winning in Korean courts?

    Mike Breen did, and against Samsung, no less.

    Someone I know accused of child sexual molestation at a local government run English class also had his case thrown out by the judge for lack of evidence (sadly, he had to spend close to 3 months on remand before the case went before the judge).

    I don’t think it is a clear-cut as Anonymous_Joe would like it to be to help his case.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    @83

    My recollection is not that Breen won, but that Samsung drooped its action after Breen issued a rather abject apology.

  • hamel

    That is not my recollection.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    http://articles.latimes.com/2010/may/13/world/la-fg-korea-samsung-20100513

    “Samsung spokesman James Chung said the company decided to drop the lawsuit after Breen sent a letter of apology on May 7.”

  • babotaengi

    Hamel recent-memory fail. Perhaps a visit to your physician is in order.

  • MrMao

    Didn’t the Samsung incident essentially end Breen’s career as a columnist in the K-Times? Shame.

  • hamel

    To both of the above: I have corresponded with Mr Breen on this matter in the last hour. It is as I said. There were two cases – civil and criminal. The criminal charge was thrown out of court by the judge, and Samsung dropped the civil case after a non-abject letter of apology was sent, apologizing for offence taken, not for what was written.

  • MrMao
  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    @89

    Contrary to your insistence, it is not as you said. The fact is, regardless of what Breen says, he did not “win” the civil case; it was settled by his apology, not by a court determination in his favor.

    I don’t know about the criminal case, but I also doubt it was dismissed by the judge; more likely it was discontinued by the prosecution in light of the civil settlement as being an inefficient use of resources.

    The overarching point, contrary to your original claim, is that Breen’s case(s) are not good examples of foreigners getting well (or ill) treated by the working of Korean justice system (as distinct from the travesty represented by the relevant libel laws the provisions of which made possible the claims against him in the first place

  • hamel

    Sperwer: with respect, counsellor (retired), I disagree. The following is from Mr Breen himself. Further inquiries can be taken up directly with the man himself:

    Mr. Sperwer is perhaps confusing this with the printed apology by the newspaper which resulted in the editor and publisher’s names being taken off the suit. But not our hero’s name.

    There were two suits – civil and criminal. In the civil suit, I was fined 25m in a preliminary judgment, but refused the judgment which meant it would go to court. I was then advised that Samsung wanted to drop it but would like a letter from me. I was happy to do this provided I did not apologize for what I had written, only that I upset people. This I did and they withdrew the civil suit. I only found this out when I turned up to an empty courtroom. The apology was minimal and was quite sincere.

    By pure coincidence, an interview I had given a month earlier to the LA Times appeared the next day. I then got requests for other interviews which I gave. I understand Samsung considered this bad form. It was. When a superior is kicking you in Korea, you’re not supposed to stick him one.

    On the other track, the criminal suit went ahead – that’s up to the prosecutor to drop, not the original complainant. The preliminary judgment there was a 5m fine. I rejected this and it went to trial. After discussing fees with a MH regular, I opted for the stupid foreigner defense strategy and turned up unprepared and without a lawyer. The judge said the court should provide an interpreter and to come back a month later. At the second appearance, the judge said the was no victim in this crime and threw the case out. I was disappointed because I wanted to be found not guilty.

    So I wasn’t abject, but then nor did they lose face as I had hoped. I’d say Breen 2: Samsung: 1

    The travesty of Korean liberal laws notwithstanding, they apply equally to Koreans as to non-Koreans. So my overarching point still stands, that foreigners are NOT doomed to fail in Korean courts, as was asserted by Anonymous-Joe. :)

  • robert neff

    Tell that to the crew of the Hebei Spirit, an oil tanker hit by a barge and causing the huge oil spill off Korea’s coast.
    (Wiki – ok, I am too lazy to find all the links)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2007_South_Korea_oil_spill

  • hamel

    Neff: I will gladly say to the crew of the Hebei Spirit what I said here. I am not saying that things work out well all the time for foreigners in the Korean justice system; I am simply saying that it is not as bad as Anonymous_Joe makes out.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    honestly these attacks don’t sound that bad. sounds like drunk kids causing trouble and roughing people up or muggings gone wrong. they’re not like murders or anything. there are tons of murders in the US that just go unnoticed because they’re so common. koreans and australians probably aren’t used to lots of violence so this kind of thing is a big deal.

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    here’s a valid question: why do the australians have to accept non-whites when koreans don’t have to accept non-koreans? who but the white guy has ever questioned his hatred? you gotta shut up on this one, korea.

  • hamel

    pawi: wha? are you being ironic?

  • Anonymous_Joe

    I see I’ve gotten myself into a Vietnam type police action with the language police. Yes, I will agree to that if I am in Korean court and I have video tape that I was in the White House lunching with the Pope and Dalai Lama, have them appear as sworn and in Korean court witnesses to my alibi for the time of a crime, I might prevail in Korean court.

    94 hamel: I am not saying that things work out well all the time for foreigners in the Korean justice system; I am simply saying that it is not as bad as Anonymous_Joe makes out.

    Fair enough. …but how do you, as a foreigner, like your chances in the Korean court system, even if you are right, the counter party is wrong, and you have evidence?

    Remember this?

    “The US court, however, deferred executing the Korean court’s decision for 60 days, saying it could not determine whether Korean court decisions regarding foreigners were fair. In September, the US court outright refused to execute the Korean court’s decision, arguing that Korea was a non-party to the Hague Abduction Convention and Korean courts were so biased against Americans that it approached the level of a human rights violation.”

  • keith

    I highly doubt that the incidents are race related. It just sounds some idiots walking around dodgy neighbourhoods and suffering the unfortunate results. It’s the same as hanging out in some of the dodgy Korean places in Hongdae, I know of several cases of people being assaulted for the crime of simply not being Korean. Hongdae is a dump and I only ever go there for the odd gig.

    Racism does exist in Korea to much larger degree than in the west and more advanced countries. A prime example is the ironically named ‘London 24′ bar in Itaewon – which is a ‘Koreans only’ place http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6Cp7Vu9pCU&noredirect=1 There is another new place called New York 24 that I suspect is owned by the same people, I don’t know if they also have a Koreans only policy. They obviously don’t get how strange it is for them to name their racist bars after arguably the two of the most international cities on the planet.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    95 Jashin Densetsu: they’re not like murders or anything. there are tons of murders in the US that just go unnoticed because they’re so common.

    Do you know of tons of murders in the US that went unnoticed?

    I suppose if the murders were suppressed in the news they would go unnoticed, but then how do you know about them?

  • Anonymous_Joe

    99 keith: Racism does exist in Korea to much larger degree than in the west and more advanced countries. A prime example is the ironically named ‘London 24′ bar in Itaewon – which is a ‘Koreans only’ place. There is another new place called New York 24 that I suspect is owned by the same people, I don’t know if they also have a Koreans only policy. They obviously don’t get how strange it is for them to name their racist bars after arguably the two of the most international cities on the planet.

    In another thread, who might be MH’s most insightful, prescient, and yet most vilified poster for being so far ahead of his time in cutting to the quick of today’s day and age and all the while maintaining his sense of humility noted the lack of irony filter.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/shocking Jakgani

    In 2013 – Australia is the second best place to be….

    Australia will be the second-best country in the world to be born in next year, a study says.

    The “lucky country” scored 8.12 out of a possible 10 points, just 0.1 behind Switzerland, The Economist’s Intelligence Unit said in their 2013 where-to-be-born index released last week.

    Following closely behind were Scandinavian countries Norway, Sweden and Denmark. New Zealand was ranked seventh with a score of 7.95, while Nigeria came in 80th and last with 4.74 points.

    The magazine said the list, the first since 1988, was compiled using a combination of surveys – where people said how happy they are – with objective determinants about the quality of life.

    Advertisement
    “Being rich helps more than anything else, but it is not all that counts; things like crime, trust in public institutions and the health of family life matter too,” the unit’s director of country forecasting services, Laza Kekic, said in a statement.

    Indicators used include geography, demography, social and cultural characteristics, government policies and the state of the world economy.

    The list was dominated by smaller economies, with larger European economics such as Great Britain (27th), France (26th) and Germany (16th) languishing further down the list. The US, which topped the 1998 list, came in 16th.

    http://www.smh.com.au/business/australia-the-worlds-secondbest-place-to-be-born-study-20121128-2adk0.html

    The first Korean “victim” who had his finger nipped…

    lucky him – Australia re-attached it for him –

    http://www.smh.com.au/national/i-feel-so-embarrassed-and-humiliated-korean-attack-victim-accuses-police-20121128-2aczj.html

    and he is still complaining (in Australian that would be winge’ing)

    photo of him with his left hand arm – (with ALL fingers)
    http://images.smh.com.au/2012/11/28/3842575/MOR-korean-narrow-20121128114444978721-300×0.jpg

  • hamel

    Jakassni – if at first you don’t succeed – try, try again, eh? Keep trolling, mate.

  • CactusMcHarris

    Jak Honey,

    You spelled ‘whinging’ incorrectly; even in Australia that’s be a mark off, and that’s fair dinkum.

  • CactusMcHarris

    My take on this is that it wasn’t racially motivated – he appeared to be a pigeon for plucking and he was in the wrong place at the wrong time. How much trouble can you put yourself into when that happens? A lot, as most of us know.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/shocking Jakgani

    Thanks Cactus, I never did know how to add “ing” to whinge. Now why does it need a “h” ?

  • http://bensmatrix.info ElCanguro

    I’d say grouse is more ocker and kitsch in an old fashioned, folksy way than bogan. Bogan’s are apt to saying ‘sweet as’ for anything and everything they like or just ‘sweet’.

    Anyways to break it down for my North American friends, what I meant was the suburb of Sunnybank – adjoining the suburb of the attack, Runcorn – is a great place with its Asian food courts where you can get delicious, cheap food from every corner of SE and East Asia. ‘It’s sweet as, cuz’

  • babotaengi

    “Grouse” is pure 80′s bogan. An ocker’s more apt to say it’s “ripper”. The lines are blurred, of course. Heard a lot of wogs refer things as “sweet”, but they’re hardly the only offenders.

    The Melbourne victim does come off as a complete whinger, but even in Aus. The squeaky wheel gets the oil.

  • hamel

    The Melbourne victim does come off as a complete whinger, but even in Aus. The squeaky wheel gets the oil.

    I would love to see how stoic you blokes would be if you got your arm broken in Korea (requiring surgery to set, it seems from the photo) and a finger cut off, and you felt that the cops weren’t doing enough to find and punish the perpetrators.

    Come on, let’s be reasonable here. It can’t be right to bitch and moan about how bad our lot is in Korea while calling someone who gets treated poorly in Australia a whinger.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Why is he a whinger? He got seriously assaulted and robbed. The fact that he was “in the wrong place at the wrong time” (does not the law apply everywhere at all time or are there magical places where the law sometimes does not apply but does at the “right time”?) Is not the job of the Police to protectm and failing this, to catch the wrongdoer? If the cops aren’t doing their job, he has every right to speak up. I notice he isnt whinging about the country of Australia but about the lazy and incompetent cops. For the cops to even hin that there are wrong places where at the wrong time the law does not extend to is shocking.

  • dogbertt

    Thanks, “mates”. Now, what are “ockars” and “bogans”?

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    @109

    Hear, hear

    BUT, his instinctive invocation of racism as the explanation for the alleged insensivity of the police still is despicable

  • Wedge

    Blaming the victim is wrong. It also demeans the criminals by implying they are robots without free will. “He came to this lousy neighborhood in the wee hours, what was I supposed to do? It’s his fault I beat him up.” Further, any cop too lazy to get his arse out of the donut shop because the victim was too stupid to stay away from a dodgy area should be fired.

  • hamel

    @111:

    Now, what are “ockars” and “bogans”?

    What, and give you more invective to hurl at Aussies you disagree with (a la chavs @ Keith). Don’t come the raw prawn with me, “mate.”

    @112:

    BUT, his instinctive invocation of racism as the explanation for the alleged insensivity of the police still is despicable

    Despicable? I think that erodes the meaning of the word. It is not despicable, but rather entirely human and understandable. Just look around this and other K-blogs to see the same done in reverse.

    @ 113

    Further, any cop too lazy to get his arse out of the donut shop because the victim was too stupid to stay away from a dodgy area should be fired.

    Question: do visitors to any city receive a map upon arrival showing “bad neighborhoods” and “shitholes to avoid” with times to stay away?

    By the way, most common thing said by Aussie cops these days to people phoning with a complaint “Nothing we can do about it.”

  • Wedge

    #114: I heard Microsoft came up with some sort of “avoid ghetto” app and got grief for it from the PC Police. Dunno if that app actually has been developed and is available. Good idea.

  • dogbertt

    What, and give you more invective to hurl at Aussies you disagree with (a la chavs @ Keith). Don’t come the raw prawn with me, “mate.”

    The only disagreement I could ever imagine having with an Aussie would be in the unlikely event he cut off my finger.

    Keef is a straight-up pom wuss. No comparison.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    It is not despicable, but rather entirely human and understandable. Just look around this and other K-blogs to see the same done in reverse.

    Yep, human, understandable (but not excusable) and despicable – in both cases.

  • babotaengi

    I wouldn’t call the racism claims despicable, just pure whinging from a sook with a victim complex. A lot of the same does go on around here.

    Calling out the cops on their laziness is purely justified and even commendable. Not that I woulda got the cops involved in the first place if it were me and I could avoid it. I’d be more inclined to heal up and do some laps around Box Hill in search of a little outback justice.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    I would love to see how stoic you blokes would be if you got your arm broken in Korea (requiring surgery to set, it seems from the photo) and a finger cut off, and you felt that the cops weren’t doing enough to find and punish the perpetrators.

    Come on, let’s be reasonable here. It can’t be right to bitch and moan about how bad our lot is in Korea while calling someone who gets treated poorly in Australia a whinger.

    Church!

  • Jashin Densetsu

    he got his pinkie cut and broke his arm. not really a huge deal. you can get hurt like that playing touch football. he wasn’t slashed in the face or stabbed anywhere near any vitals. there are probably thousands of teens roaming around so it’s not surprising that the cops don’t have any leads and can’t find them.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    you can get your pinkie cut off playing football?

  • hamel

    Good grief. I give up.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    Bro, do you think this otherwise seemingly innocent tourist had latent homosexual thoughts, say at one time during his formative preteen years, and so this pack of roaming teens channeled and assumed cosmic avenging angels thus protecting humanity from Australia to the far reaches of the Earth from the gay influence that skewed Nate Silver’s interpretation of the poll data and kicked the presidential election to Obama?

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    um….yeah..no idea, Joe.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    But you raise some questions, thats for sure.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    this article says he was “embarrassed and humiliated” http://www.smh.com.au/national/i-feel-so-embarrassed-and-humiliated-korean-attack-victim-accuses-police-20121128-2aczj.html

    if it was really serious he’d feel happy to be alive and still shaken up, not embarrassed and humiliated. there’s nothing the cops can do if there are lots of drunk teens roaming around at night and there weren’t any witnesses or anything.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    Ahhhh, Salman… You have eyes but cannot see. You move your eyes but cannot read.

    There are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    So what good are the cops?

  • Jashin Densetsu

    what about intent? there isn’t really evidence of serious hostile intent. if they were ganging up on him and surrounding him, they could have done some serious damage to him with a knife. if they had such an intent that is. the fact that he just got his pinkie cut suggests that serious intent wasn’t there. they were probably just waving around the knife to scare him, and he probably had his hand up in a defensive posture and it got in the way and cut as a result. and he probably broke his arm when he fell to the ground and landed on the arm or something.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Is getting a finger cut off like a bruise or a wedgie? Want me to chop off one of yours, Jashin?

    Next time you get armed at gun or knife point and you dont die, maybe the cops shouldnt do anything because hey, they could have killed you.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    are you saying they had the intent to seriously hurt or kill him bro? if they had that intent, why didn’t they do it bro? they outnumbered him and had at least one knife. sounds like they were just roughhousing bro.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    he was outnumbered 10 to 1 and they had at least one knife on them. they could have filleted him like a fish or ended him right there bro.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    I’m no lawyer but it seems they had the intent to commit armed robbery and they inflicted physical damage during that robbery.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    yes, they could have, then they would be guilty of murder or manslaughter. Instead they are more likely guilty of, at the very least, armed robbery and assault.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    i don’t think they stole anything bro. it says they asked for a cigarette and he refused.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    they stole his phone, didnt they?

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Or they TRIED. Would you argue in court “My client broke into a house and tried to steal the jewelry at gunpoint, but the dog foiled him and he ran off, so because he failed to get away with the jewels, he is therefore not guilty of anything. He was just roughhousing, it was really good natured, and he culd have killed them all, but he didnt, he should be commanded instead of decried”

    Yes?

  • Jashin Densetsu

    btw, when people try to bum a cigarette off you on the street, you’re supposed to give one. it builds up smoker’s karma so the next time you’re out of cigs, you can bum one off someone on the street. i guess this dude learned the hard way.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    it doesn’t say they stole his phone or anything bro.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    I carry cigarettes with me on the street so that when would be robbers accost me I can silently, slowly, insidiously kill them.

    …not just a hat rack on my shoulders.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    “According to Cho, the kids approached him asking to borrow his photo to call their mother. He lent it to them, but then they tried to make off with it. They then mercilessly beat him around the head with fists and blunt objects, I’m guessing when he tried to stop them.”

    They tried, bro.

    What the fuck does it men youre supposed to give them cigs? What if you arent a smoker and they dont believe you? And even if youre a smoker, how the FUCK are you obluigated to give free smokes to others? is that a law? Are they legally allowed to beat the shit out of you and cut off your pinky if you don’t? Are fucking stupid?

  • Jashin Densetsu

    that’s a different guy bro. i’m talking about the guy who got his pinkie cut and arm broken.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    it’s just among smokers bro. you don’t ask random people bro. you ask people who are smokers.

  • http://tesslerdavis.tumblr.com/ jd

    I’d love to know the ratio of troll posts to honest posts for Jashin Densetsu.

    Hundred to one?

  • Jashin Densetsu

    i haven’t made any troll posts here bro.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    i can’t be the only one here who thinks this attack is overblown.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    here’s what i’m guessing happened. the teens were probably drunk and loitering or roaming around. they crossed paths with the victim without necessarily any intent. one of them asked for a cig, victim refused, and they probably got annoyed or pissed off and said something and then surrounded him to push him around a bit and roughhouse without any major serious intent. he probably fell down while they were pushing him around and broke his arm that way. they probably got scared after he fell down and scrambled.

  • hamel

    Perhaps Jashin (and others) are unaware that asking for a cigarette is the new way of saying “your money or your physicaly wellbeing.” I kid you not. Have a look at these news reports!.

  • babotaengi

    Fingers don’t just lop off when you wave a knife at em, bro. You’re watching too many Samurai movies. That would take serious intent or incredible misfortune during a balls to the wall brawl.

    I don’t give the kids credit for being anything but gutless scum, even if the victim is a big baby.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    #146 Jashin Densetsu: i can’t be the only one here who thinks this attack is overblown.

    Much like Sybil, there must be at least 16 voices inside your head thinking so.

  • cm

    Yet another attack reported today, fifth attack on South Korean students studying in Australia, in three months period.

    This time, a 28 year old female Korean foreign exchange student was attacked by two young women and a man.

  • rwilliams_4459se

    good post babotaengi

  • TruthCommissionShouldBeTruthful

    Why only Koreans get attacked?

  • TimeOut

    Japanese lived in Melb ovr 20yrs,
    Studied in Korea for a yr would like to say,

    Hey, its not like Koreans are the only ones who get assalted you know?
    Others just know how handle or avoid situations like these.

    Being in Boxhill late at night is like asking to get raped or assulted.
    No matter what counrty you live in shit happens.
    But in my 20yrs in melb, the worst I had (beside the bitch fights at high school)
    was an Indian cab driver swaring out the window and chasing me down the street.
    I am sure there are worse out there but never got involved.

    I have Korean friends and do not think that I am being racist,
    but am not happy whith the behavior and attitute of Koreans.

    My friends know how I think and are cool with it.
    They KNOW that their race love attention and would do anything to get it.

    I say, let them be. So what if Koreans stop comin to Australia?
    They are not doing Australia any good anyway.

    Australia may be a less stressful place without them making claims, reporting back to Korean news-papers(although I do not give a —-) and opening Japanese and Chinese food stores.

    People should just go online and google “koreans are” and see what you get.
    Not all are true. But most of them seem to be.
    And given advise(?) from my korean bud, most of the “good coments” about Koreans online posted by “Non- Koreans” are written by “Koreans”.

  • DUguymontreal55

    TimeOut, umiru bolno..