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Microsoft to suspend XBox Live service to minors from Nov 27

According to Bloter.net, Microsoft Korea sent out an email yesterday telling folk that from Nov 27, it would no longer provide XBox Live Service to those under 18 living in Korea.

That means no more online gaming or downloading content on the XBox.

On a positive note, it also means no longer getting pawned by Korean middle school kids in COD.

Microsoft Korea is saying this is because of Korea’s computer gaming law that bans those under 16 from playing online games past midnight. Microsoft Korea said it would be too difficult to implemented a system that would suspend service to minors at specific times of the day, or block minors at the request of their parents in a worldwide service.

Local game services are following the law, but global services like XBox Live are not. Anyway, terminating service for minors was the best option to keep XBox Live alive in Korea, Microsoft Korea explained.

Even non-minor users of XBox Live in Korea will need to undergo I-Pin verification through XBox’s homepage.

Blotter notes the irony of the gaming law, namely, that it does not apply to offline gaming.

In June, Sony “temporarily” suspended service of its PS Store in Korea because of the gaming law. It has yet to be reopened.

Marmot’s Note: Government regulators in the Most Wired Nation on Earth score another own goal. Still, it’s an own goal I stand to benefit from, so good job, I say.

On a related note, making my way slowly through Black Ops II’s campaign. Like what I see so far. And I sort of missed Manuel Noriega.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Protectionism doesn’t work. You won’t benefit from it either. You stand to benefit most when facing the best competition.

  • madar

    Yeah Robert, Salaryman is right! Stop thinking it’s a good thing you’ll be protected from those 16 year old hunter killers who live on line and dream of being pro gamers. Think of all the mad skills you gain by going toe to toe with them!

  • Yu Bum Suk

    Are so many parents really so helpless to stop their kids playing video games all night long?

  • Anonymous_Joe

    Agreed, @3 Yu Bum Suk. From Uncle Marmot’s post,

    Microsoft Korea said it would be too difficult to implemented a system that would suspend service to minors at specific times of the day, or block minors at the request of their parents in a worldwide service.

    As a parent, I can block my minor child BY PULLING THE F@CKIN’ PLUG.

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    Hong Gil Dong’s opinion, on any topic, when interviewed by a newspaper, seems to be The government must take action. Koreans are no libertarians, that’s for sure.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Collectivists dont make good libertarians.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    you can have libertarianism and laws like this. not having laws like this is liberalism, not libertarianism.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    for example, if a group of people want to live in society that bans porn, then them having the liberty to form a government that bans porn in their territory is libertarianism. forcing porn to be available among them is liberalism, not libertarianism.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    @8 Bro, are you practicing up on your sophistry? I mean it’s cool if you are, and if you are you can’t break kayfabe, so I guess then that you really couldn’t tell me, could you?

  • Jashin Densetsu

    i’m talking about libertarianism. i’m not really sure what you’re getting at bro.

  • Pyotr

    you can have libertarianism and laws like this. not having laws like this is liberalism, not libertarianism.

    Densetsu, You have forgotten to use capitals properly. This makes you look profoundly uneducated or, at best, extremely lazy. As a result, your content is very suspect and I will not read it.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    #8 Jashin Densetsu: “for example, if a group of people want to live in society that bans porn, then them having the liberty to form a government that bans porn in their territory is libertarianism. forcing porn to be available among them is liberalism, not libertarianism.

    Bro, that’s brilliant.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    So if 2 people want to rob a third, this is libertarianism? I said it before, youre an idiot Jashin.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    if the third guy agreed with the other 2 to form a society in which the third guy gets robbed.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Now, what if its not 3 people but 3 million? Do the 2 million get to rob the 1 million if the 1 million agree and do we still get to call that libertarianism?

    P.S. you do realize the impossibility of agreeing to be robbed, don’t you? Do you see it?

  • Anonymous_Joe

    …and enacting laws making robbery illegal is liberalism.

    Actually, what he is saying is that if people choose to live in a society that tramples individual rights and freedoms (including speech, assembly, religion, movement) and then to form a government that enforces those individual rights and freedoms is libertarianism. Then given that as the definition of libertarianism, then liberalism is enacting laws that force the recognition of individual rights.

    I have to agree with the Bro on this one. Given the conditional first statement, the concluding second statement is true. If we accept his premise, then there is no logical argument.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    agreeing to be robbed means you’re agreeing to give the money away. agreeing to give money away is certainly possible. it happens all the time. so agreeing to be robbed is possible bro.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    yes you’re right anon-joe.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    But that would require unanimous consent. What if there isn’t? Its simply mob rule, majority rule, or Democracy. Its not libertarianism by ANY stretch of the imagination.

    In this case, is there consent among those who will lose access to games? I don’t think so. But hey, they don’t vote so fuck em. Is that libertarianism? Not even close.

    I disagree. If a group of people formed a society like that it would not be libertarianism but simply totalitarianism. Just because its chosen by the majority or even everyone does not make it libertarian, since Libertarianism has a pretty well accepted definition.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Once you agree to give someting it is no longer robbery.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    if someone doesn’t consent, they wouldn’t agree in the first place. if they stopped consenting they would leave. if they weren’t allowed to leave, then it wouldn’t be libertarianism.

    as far as the kids who lose access to games, well that’s part of the bigger issue of freedom for kids. some people think that kids should have as much freedom as early as possible, others not until kids are older. if this is that important to people, they can form communities and governments based on it. the early freedom for kids people can form one, and the later freedom people could form theirs.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Liberalism and libertarianism are pretty similar. I actually prefer the word liberalism, but it got coopted by the leftists and is now associated with big government lovers. Libertarianism is a word that is used instead of that now. Liberalism sounds nicer and to me it has more appeal since its more in line with thinkers like Hayek or Bastiat who identified themselves as liberals (then we used classical liberal and now we just say libertarian)

  • Jashin Densetsu

    yes a lot of libertarians today are actually liberals or classical liberals, not libertarians bro.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    “if someone doesn’t consent, they wouldn’t agree in the first place” This actually doesnt mean anything.

    There is a very clear definition of what libertarianism is. And it does not include a government stepping on people just because the majority agrees or even if they themselves agree. If agree to live in a totalitarian state that does not change the fact that it is a totalitarian state. I just agree to live in it. Thats all.

    The games is one issue, what about prostitution and pornography or drugs?

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    While my family got out of the communist country we lived in, my relatives stayed behind. Many could have gotten out, if they wished, but they chose not to. Now, does that mean that by their staying they consented to the system? Yes. Does it mean the system was libertarian? No. It was communist.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    being able to agree to live in a totalitarian state, as opposed to being unable to, is a big deal bro. what makes totalitarian states especially bad is being unable to leave or having difficulty doing so.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Ys, it is. I have experience with that. But its not binary: Libertarian vs Totalitarian. Even someting like communism need not be totalitarian: while it was in the USSR it wsnt quite so bad in my country, many people left and no one got harassed for it. In that case, those that chose to stay consented since they could have left relatively easily (not perfectly easily, there would be some difficulties but not major one, certainly nothing like the DPRK). So again, those who stayed, consented, but the consent does not mean it was a libertarian country.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Even the USSR wasnt quite totalitarian in the end.

  • cm

    You don’t even have to pull the plug. Just get a router that has parental control on it. Come 8′oclock at night, the internet is disconnected, and only a secret password will unblock it. But this won’t stop the out of control kids who play games all night at PC-bangs.

  • dogbertt

    Lets get this discussion back on track. Korea’s restrictive gaming laws, together with MS Korea’s refusal to accommodate any of them, made XBOX Live service in Korea a gutted shell of what it could have been.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    JD apparently agrees with the remark of one famous egghead:

    “When I use a word, . . . it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.”

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • keyinjpop

    Sucks for the Xbox players. Does this also affect Playstation or Nintendo players in Korea in any way?

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