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Renaming the peaks of Dokdo

From Yonhap:

According to the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs, the government has decided to rename Dongdo “Usanbong” and Seodo “Daehanbong,” and use the new names starting Monday in the country’s official maps, textbooks and Internet portals.

I don’t know if any consideration was given to English-speaking audiences, but switching from “Dongdo” to “Usanbong?” Good choice.

And names with “bong” in them will likely appeal to young Westerners.

 

About the author: Founder/CEO of Meme Communications Korea – www.memecommunications.com

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    The reason behind changing the names smells fishy to me.

  • gbnhj

    I heard that, after this goes through, they’re planning to rename the fishing grounds surrounding Dokdo to The Bongwaters.

  • leguwan

    Bong = Bonk to young Westerners??

  • http://www.busanhaps.com Bobby McGill

    I suppose if they have enough of the bong, the two words might likely be confused.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    The name change makes sense, except that Dokdo was never called “Usando,” so the reason for calling one of the peaks “Usanbong” is totally bogus and designed to perpetuate a lie. The reason it makes sense is that Dokdo (Dok Island) is essentially two rocky islet peaks. If you are going to continue to call it “Dok Island,” then referring to the two islets as Dongdo (East Island) and Seodo (West Island) causes confusion because people might think there are three islands.

    Actually, a better name than “Dokdo,” which means “Solitary Island,” would be “Ibongdo,” which means “Island of Two Peaks.”

  • Q

    Official map (地圖區域一覽圖) published in 1936 by government of Imperial Japan marked Dokdo in Chosun district (Korea):

    http://news.nate.com/view/20121024n14227

    Here is the map enlarged:

    http://www.dokdohistory.com/data/board_10/106-1.JPG

  • Q
  • tapadamornin

    That North Jersey article covered the overall story fairly well, but this doesn’t make any sense to me:

    “Calls made to the Fort Lee-based Japanese-American Society of New Jersey about Friday’s incident were not answered Friday evening. But after police had taken the stake away as evidence, reaction by local officials and especially the Korean-American community was swift.”

    Why would the Japanese-Americans care less what Japan as a country was doing? That’s like asking for a comment from the 442nd Infantry Regiment as to why the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. If the board planted at the memorial was the same as the one found in Korea, chances are it’s one of the Japanese conservatives doing it, and not an American.

  • tapadamornin

    Grammar fail:

    “Japanese-Americans probably couldn’t care less what Japan as a country was doing.”

  • broona

    Usanbong sounds like umbrella bong. Hmmm.

  • genie222001

    Qwrote:
    “Official map (地圖區域一覽圖) published in 1936 by government of Imperial Japan marked Dokdo in Chosun district (Korea)”.

    This is BS. Korea was a part of Japan at that time, and Takeshima was a part of Shimane’s territory since 1905. The San Francisco Peace Treaty did not give Korea Takeshima. Keep in mind that Korea was liberated from Japanese rule only because the US defeated Japan in WWII. The US could allow Japan to keep Korea. You can’t ignore The San Francisco Peace Treaty.

  • Q

    The asshat who placed the stake at the Palisades Park was identified as the same nut, Suzuki Nobuyuki:

    http://www.ytn.co.kr/_ln/0104_201210300000199170

  • Stereo

    Q, do you think the “map” you linked has any influence over the title of the island?

    It is not a map but a catalog of maps available for sale arranged in a map style. You can see the price of each map on it. If you had bought the map of Takeshima at that time, they would have sent you a map stating “Takeshima, Shimane Prefecture, Japan”.