Ye Olde Chosun is bitching about the slack security at the DMZ (something we’ve been bitching about for some time), especially since it seems in one recent case, a wee little North Korean fella actually climbed over the metal fences of the DMZ and walked to South Korean guard post living quarter without being spotted. In particular, the Chosun wants to bring in some high-tech gear to boost security on the line.

There are some in the Korean intelligence community who see the defections in a positive way, however:

South Korean intelligence is believed to have identified signs that there is a general breakdown in discipline in North Korea, leading some to question if the regime is on the verge of collapse.

According to a government source, three North Korean soldiers defected to the South through the eastern and western borders, indicating that there could be a serious breakdown in the internal discipline of the Communist regime.

The end could very well be on its way. The Chosun Ilbo saw this, too, noting that the guy who wacked his two superior officers before crossing over to the Land of the Great Choco Pie served with an elite front-line unit:

A teenage North Korean soldier who defected after killing two of his superiors and crossing the heavily armed border to South Korea on Saturday has told interrogators he did it because he saw “no hope” in the North.

Investigators quoted the soldier as saying he learned of the huge gap between the two Koreas through the joint-Korean Kaesong Industrial Complex. He worked at a frontline guard post within the Joint Security Area where North Korean soldiers oversee and control transaction of goods and workers commuting to the Kaesong complex.
[...]
The source added, “The North Korean regime stations hand-picked troops at border guard posts in [the truce village of] Panmunjom and the Kaesong Industrial Complex for fear of defections or ideological contamination, so this shows that discipline in the North Korean military is weakening.”

I guess he really wanted those Choco Pies.