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Green Ideal and Korean Dog Meat

Green Ideals is calling for a boycott of the 2014 Asian Games in Korea unless the South Korean Government cracks down on the dog and cat meat trade.  Not really much new in the argument – one that we have all heard many times – but… 

Amid a long list of various petitions and campaigns circulating addressing the consumption of dogs, and cats to a much lesser degree in South Korea, about 500 Korean Dog Meat Association members rallied Sept. 24 to demand the government legalize the farming of dogs for meat, saying there are at least 20,000 dog farms with six million dogs.

Exact statistics are hard to come by, but it is estimated that around a million dogs and a few thousand cats are killed each year in South Korea to make medicinal elixirs and for direct meat consumption.

Unfortunately for the dogs deemed “meat,” death does not come easy. Packed tightly in small cages pressed against each other, they suffer hours of transport from rural farms to the slaughter houses or the live animal markets.

Slaughter houses prefer electrocution for its speed. The markets often club the animal, sometimes leaving it injured but alive, before boiling it. Traditionally, dogs are hung up by their necks and beaten to death to release stress hormones that those who consume the meat that way believe makes it tastier and more healthful.

I think the only thing I was surprised about was:

South Korea is not the only country where dog meat is consumed regularly. China’s industry annually slaughters up to 10 million dogs. But a few countries where the practice was once widespread have proven that it is possible to perpetuate a beautiful culture while culling practices that are not in step with modern values.

Taiwan, Hong Kong, the Phillipines and Thailand have all banned the dog meat industries and don’t seem to be suffering any adverse consequences.

I actually thought that dog meat was still being sold in Hong Kong and Phillipines – but I guess I was wrong.  You can read the rest of the article here.

  • Bendrix

    Seriously, is the consumption of dog meat necessary these days? And do they have to be brutalized in the process? This is something I’ll never accept/understand. But I’m a pet dog owner so I’m probably biased. Still, no need to torture the poor little guys.

  • yuna

    Another reason why 박근혜 should not win.

  • jk641

    Another reason why 박근혜 should not win.

    Why? Is she a boshintang aficionado?

  • iMe

    oh, jesus christ…you know, before they ban dog meat, we should ban these bleeding heart activists from the planet first.

    WHY THE FUCK ARE YOU AGAINST PEOPLE EATING FOOD? WHAT THE FUCK IS THE MATTER WITH YOU?

    a classic example of fucking food nazis wanting to shove their “values” down everyone else’s throat. FUCK.OFF.AND.DIE.

  • Bendrix

    This is not about moralizing about animal rights or anything like that. For me, not eating dog meat is a matter of personal and cultural taste. It’s just poor etiquette when very few places still do it, and considering the place dogs hold in many people’s hearts. Dogs are a species that evolved to become companions to humans. They don’t really exist as a wild species except for feral dogs. Most other domesticated animals were bred for consumption, whereas dogs not so much, except in a few places. There have been times of hardship where of course people from all over the world have resorted to eating dogs and cats, but they mostly stopped when it was no longer necessary.

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    koreans can eat whatever they want though i think its disgusting. dogs should be off the menu. how many animals actually WANT to be around us humans?

  • jk641

    They should make beating animals to death a crime.
    Just zap them, for goodness’ sake.

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    They should make beating animals to death a crime.

    It is a crime.

  • jk641

    It is a crime.

    Well, then they should prosecute it properly.

  • hamel

    Guys, guys, it’s okay! Robert the Marmot – who we all know is a dogmeat fan from old tmes – told me that he doesn’t believe that the beating of dogs is the norm at all. As far as he believes (or needs to), dogs are usually killed in a quick and humane way, even though it is argued that dog meat is more tender if the dogs veins pump with adrenaline before death.

    So it’s cool. Very humane.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #5,

    So, you’d be okay if Hindus started being pricks about how Christians eat beef?

  • hamel

    SomeguyinKorea: if you want to make an equivalence between irrational and unprovable Hindu belief in cows being a sacred animal, and humanity’s history with dogs over the last 10 thousand or more years, then yeah, sure, I would be okay with that.

  • babotaengi

    Poor bastards.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #12,

    Right, sure, because anthropomorphizing dogs is so much more logical. What are you saying Lassie? Timmy fell in the well? LOL.

    PS. Tell me, how long have humans have domesticated cattle? Since at least the Neolithic…Yup, as long as dogs have been domesticated.

    PPS. And why were early dogs domesticated? As a substitute for motherhood for young women and old ladies? LOL. No, as a guard animal, a beast of burden, a source of fur…and as a source of food.

  • hamel

    Right, sure, because anthropomorphizing dogs is so much more logical. What are you saying Lassie? Timmy fell in the well? LOL.

    That’s a nice straw man you have built there, Someguy, let me help you burn it!

    FWIW, I am not opposed to eating dog meat per se, so I don’t usually go for the “dogs are special to humans” argument, but your making the false equivalence with Hindu veneration of cows was and is so ridiculous that I couldn’t resist.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #15,

    Straw man? Ironic a bit, don’t you think? The veneration of cows is no more nor less illogical than the anthropomorphizing of dogs. The fact dogs are pack animals, and by extension of this are adapted to express attachment to humans than cows are, doesn’t change the fact that throughout their domestication they have been used as a source of food by humans.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    …Correction…are better adapted…

  • Arghaeri

    And Bendrix really needs to sort out his thinking, its a matter of personal choice for him, but you other guys shouldn’t do it either because it will upset people like hom who’ve exercised their personal choice not to. LOL!

  • yuna

    Like all moral debates, it’s a right to be able to vote for democratic government. Personal choice imposed on another is often debated anyway, i.e. legalization of abortion. I have no problem with anti-abortion protestors and debates although I am probably pro-choice at the moment. I have no qualms with their qualms.
    If enough people find the process of abortion abhorrent enough to vote for a government to make it illegal, I would be OK with that.

  • hamel

    No it’s not ironic that I label your argument a straw man fallacy, because you paint me as anthropomorphizing dogs, when I do no such thing.

  • yuna

    Fook, but I really don’t want to argue. Bendrix @5 look up my last couple of posts on this – all your points have been argued to death for and against. And the more I argue on this point, the more I just lose hope in humanity in their disgusting justification for gluttony so I will stay away this time.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #20,

    No, it’s ironic because you painted me as justifying Hindu’s veneration of cows, while I was using to drive my point that it’s arrogant to impose one’s own food culture onto others.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    using it, that is…

  • hamel

    No, it’s ironic because you painted me as justifying Hindu’s veneration of cows,

    For the third and final time, I am saying that you were making a false equivalence between venerating cows due to some putative invisible spiritual significance, and deciding not to eat dogs because of the role they play in (some) human lives.

  • commander

    #24 – Not taking sides here but that’s drawing a fine and discriminating line while also heading down a slippery slope, bro. Hindus have as much right to be disgusted and offended by the practice of devouring Bevo as those who disagree with the practice of eating Fido, regardless of your perceived “putative invisible spiritual significance” basis of the former.

  • judge judy

    i’m surprised cat consumption is cited.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #24,

    Not at all.

    You assume that the “role they[dogs] play in (some) human lives” is more significant, distinct, and better assessed, than that which cows play in lives of Hindus and other humans.

    In other words, as commander pointed out, you’re heading down a very slippery slope.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    When I can tell a steer, “Go round up the dogs,” and it does exactly what I say, I’ll consider giving up beef.

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #28,
    You need to lower your expectations. I’ll settle for seeing a steer trying to hump someone’s leg or lick its balls since that’s what most dogs are only capable of accomplishing.

  • yuna

    hump someone’s leg or lick its balls

    That’s why I’ve lowered my expectations that not every human male can be Einstein or Mozart.

    Dogs have different personalities, IQ, and breed-traits, just like humans. Also nature vs nurture play a role which is why we have rescue dogs and police dogs.

    http://www.examiner.com/article/loyal-dog-stays-by-owner-s-grave-for-six-years-argentina

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #30,

    Had I made a similar statement about women, I’d be accused of being a misogynist.

  • Bendrix

    18

    I also said I consider it a matter of etiquette. Most countries in the world do not consume dog meat, because most people have decided that it’s offensive and unnecessary. Same with cats. It wouldn’t kill Koreans to not eat it. There are plenty of other options on the table, ones that are not offensive to the sensitivities of most people that Koreans share the Earth with. I feel the same way about whaling and hunting dolphins. There are protocols that countries agree to, lot of them. Why can’t Korea agree to this one? There’s no need to be stubborn about it like the Japanese are about whaling.

    Like some have said, we shouldn’t anthropomorphize dogs. We also should not deify humans. Not everything we decide to do is to be held in veneration. People make conscious choices to change all the time, even in matters that are purely just about choice or taste. Korea wants acceptance and respect and has changed itself in lots of ways that were probably thought unacceptable at one time, because of tradition, custom, culture, whatever. But they did make those changes and it didn’t harm them in any way.

  • commander

    #30 – Some say pigs are more intelligent than dogs. Where are the complaints about somgyupsal? Oink oink.

  • Bendrix

    33

    I don’t know if that’s true. But even then, pigs do not form social groupings the way humans, dogs, dolphins, and apes do. They are not as responsive to and cooperative with humans as dogs are.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #32,

    You’re kidding, right?

    So, people have to give up their food culture because foreigners feel offended by it? Arrogant a bit much, don’t you think?

    (You can bring up whales and dolphins up when you see Bob Barker on TV advising us to spay and neuter our pet whales and dolphins).

    #33,

    But pigs aren’t furry and they smell bad.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #34,

    You’ve obviously never watched the movie Babe.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #34,

    Speaking of apes, chimpanzees hunt and eat bonobos. I’ve seen it with my two eyes. Bonobos form social groups and are certainly more intelligent than dogs.

  • Bendrix

    35

    I didn’t say people have to give up their food culture, but they could make the intelligent choice to, as a matter of diplomacy. Do all Koreans condone eating dog meat? No. So it’s not something integral to the culture. It’s silly to keep eating dog meat because it supposedly infuses your testicles with extra man juice or fights cancer or whatever. Why are many Koreans willing to take on a foreign religion like Christianity but not give up eating dog meat? To me, the former adaptation of foreign culture, and quitting of traditional religions, is way way more mind boggling than giving up dog meat would be.

  • Bendrix

    37

    Bonobos and chimpanzees make great pets, until they reach puberty and their impulses to tear off your limbs comes into play. Besides, this not about animal eating habits but about the relationship between humans and certain animals.

  • tinyflowers

    I am saying that you were making a false equivalence between venerating cows due to some putative invisible spiritual significance, and deciding not to eat dogs because of the role they play in (some) human lives.

    Is this really a difference in kind though? In both cases you have human beings deciding the value of animal life. Once you make that leap who is to say your reasons for playing God are any more valid than mine?

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #39,

    What? Whose talking about about keeping chimpanzees and bonobos as pets? Aren’t those animals capable of forming a social bond without humans being part of the equation?

    And, chimpanzees eating bonobos is relevant to this discussion. Chimpanzees and humans are both omnivores. We eat everything.

    You’re also ignoring one of the main reasons humans domesticated dogs: as a food source.

    #40,

    Exactly.

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    I didn’t say people have to give up their food culture, but they could make the intelligent choice to, as a matter of diplomacy.

    The “intelligent choice” you speak of IS the choice to give up on food culture.

    Like Yuna, I am tired of debating this issue, albeit for completely different reasons. But let’s at least try to make logically consistent arguments here.

  • bumfromkorea

    It’s silly to keep eating dog meat because it supposedly infuses your testicles with extra man juice or fights cancer or whatever.

    Uh huh. Well, there goes your credibility.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #38,

    I’m with The Korean here. You’re trolling.

  • TheKorean2

    Domestic dog was and still is eaten worldwide, Europe, Africa, Asia, etc. How about Americans and their choice of eating alligators and squirrels?

  • enomoseki

    Swiss people eat dog meat. It’s called dog sausage.

    from Wikipedia
    Popular Swiss recipes for dog meat include gedörrtes Hundefleisch served as paper-thin slices, as well as smoked dog ham, Hundeschinken, which is prepared by salting and drying raw dog meat.

    According to the 21 November 1996 edition of the Rheintaler Bote, a Swiss newspaper covering the Rhine Valley area, the rural Swiss cantons of Appenzell and St. Gallen are known to have had a tradition of eating dogs, curing dog meat into jerky and sausages, as well as using the lard for medicinal purposes. Dog sausage and smoked dog jerky remains a staple in the Swiss cantons of St. Gallen and Appenzell, where one farmer was quoted in a regional weekly newspaper as saying that “meat from dogs is the healthiest of all. It has shorter fibres than cow meat, has no hormones like veal, no antibiotics like pork.”

    A few years earlier, a news report on RTL Television on the two cantons set off a wave of protests from European animal welfare activists and other concerned citizens. A 7,000-name petition was filed to the commissions of the cantons, who rejected it, saying it was not the state’s right to monitor the eating habits of its citizens.

    The production of food from dog meat for commercial purposes, however, is illegal in Switzerland.

  • TheKorean2

    Hot Dog, where did the term came from?

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    TK2 (#42), you mean, “Where did the expression ‘Hot Dog’ come from?”

    Apparently, sausages were sometimes called “dogs” as early as the 19th century because Germans did at times eat dog meat and were suspected of adding it to sausage fixings. As for “hot,” take a guess.

    SGIK (#29), concerning “a steer trying to hump someone’s leg or lick its balls,” you must be thinking of a “Hausstier”! A steer would be unable to “lick its balls” — and would also probably show little interest in humping anything. You need to lower your expectations for steers . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    Sorry, I meant TK2 #47.

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • Bendrix

    OK, fine. Give up traditional religious beliefs: no big deal. We’ll replace it with a completely nonsensical one from the Middle East. Quit eating dogs: no effing way! That is an important and irreplaceable Korean custom that will never be banished.

    Swiss recipes for dog that are no longer really used? Who cares. I acknowledged before that all over the world people have done it at some point, but it’s no longer practiced widely. Most people nowadays condemn the practice. I remember there was an old Italian guy on a cooking show recently who caught a lot of flak for talking about eating cat meat. But, he’s an old timer, and was talking about something no one really does anymore.

    As for trolling, I don’t think I’ve gone to that level. I was being facetious but it’s true Koreans think eating these kinds of dishes has medicinal properties. That is totally untrue. Dog meat is not so different in composition from other mammalian protein that it confers special nutritional benefits.

  • bumfromkorea

    I was being facetious but it’s true Koreans think eating these kinds of dishes has medicinal properties.

    Wow, it’s like discussing the topic with yuna, but with even less pretense of reason.

    I’m out. Keep on thinking that a bunch of barbarians are eating dogs to get their dicks up.

  • broona

    It makes sense to me that many people from all cultures, not just Koreans, have embraced Christianity. The gospel, even in its early history, was preached to Gentiles, I.e. the Greeks. Its message about love and redemption is one that goes beyond culture. Let’s not bring this into the “eating dog” argument, please.

  • http://technobar.blogspot.com TheStumbler

    I think it would be more humane to kill the dogs right after they’ve had sex, thus preserving the supposed benefits of their veins pumping with adrenaline and hormones immediately before slaughter.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    Proverbial wisdom tells us, “It’s a dog-eat-dog world.” I guess we know what that implies . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • babotaengi

    That dog-eating Koreans are filthy curs?

    Sorry, didn’t mean to strip away the artistry from your implication.

  • Arghaeri

    That’s why I’ve lowered my expectations that not every human male can be Einstein or Mozart.

    How so? Surely its primae facie evidence that not every human male can be Einstein or Mozart. :-)

  • Arghaeri

    Apparently, sausages were sometimes called “dogs” as early as the 19th century because Germans did at times eat dog meat and were suspected of adding it to sausage fixings. As for “hot,” take a guess.

    So why aren’t they called Heiss Hund the Jeffery?

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    Difficult to say, Arg, but perhaps because “Jeffery” isn’t a German name . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • Arghaeri

    “then” Jeffery, :-)

  • Bendrix

    51

    I never said this was about reason, or rationality. That’s why I’m using words like personal choice, etiquette, diplomacy, etc. I understand this is culturally subjective. What I mean is Korea has made a lot of changes to its culture to join the modern world. Some of the changes I think have been far more drastic and profoundly altering to what was once a part of Korean identity than quitting eating dog meat would be. So why not just give it up, as have most other modern nations it wants to be including among?

  • bumfromkorea

    Bendrix at #60

    I never said this was about reason, or rationality. That’s why I’m using words like personal choice, etiquette, diplomacy, etc.

    Bendrix at #38

    It’s silly to keep eating dog meat because it supposedly infuses your testicles with extra man juice or fights cancer or whatever.

    What are you, Mitt Romney?

  • Bendrix

    wow, you pointed out an inconsistency. I’m human, forgive me. I’m sure you understand, though, the gist of what I’m saying. that second point could also be considered one of personal taste. you’re just nitpicking things I’ve said and not answering the main point I’ve made a few times now but which you’ve failed to address. I’ll write it again since you keep selectively ignoring it:

    Korea has made a lot of changes to its culture to join the modern world. Some of the changes I think have been far more drastic and profoundly altering to what was once a part of Korean identity than quitting eating dog meat would be. So why not just give it up, as have most other modern nations it wants to be including among?

  • Arghaeri

    Yes we understand that is good etiquette for other people not to eat dog to suit your personal mores, but that it is fine for you to ingnore their personal mores by not accepting them exercising the same personal choice.

    i.e you are a perfect hypocrite.

  • Arghaeri

    If its purely about personal choice and etiquette then you would exercise good etiquette and allow them to exercise their personal choice.

  • Arghaeri

    I exercise my personal choice by not eating dig, but I do not feel the need to impose my choice on others. I am, however, in full support of humane treatment for all animals in the “production” process.

  • bumfromkorea

    First, given the disturbing implication that can be drawn at #38 about how you *really* think about the Koreans, I don’t think it’s just an “inconsistency”.

    You might want to check with the rest of the modern world before you start making that huge assumption about the consensus. Otherwise, you might end up sounding like a hypocritical idiot.

    Or, as the K-Barbarians would say, Uga Booga Dick Up With Ball Juice When Eat Dog.

  • Awarren

    What is so disturbing about what Bendrix said? It certainly wasn’t polite and will offend anyone who identifies themselves with dog eaters or takes umbrage at a stinging criticism of Korean’s myths and outdated beliefs. But the simple fact is that many Korean males still believe that eating dogs, especially during the summer months or when one’s stamina/energy is low, gives on a boost. Are you denying this?

  • Arghaeri

    I neither identify with korean dog eaters nor take umbrage at criticism if outdated korean beliefs, particularly since I didn’t realise that exercising “personal choice” was an oudated belief.

    What is disturbing is that Bendrix claims it is a matter of personal choice, but only on the condition that the personal choice accords with his.

  • Arghaeri

    As to the completely separate point as to the reasons for that choice, no I am not denying that “some” korean men have a superstitious belief, but that most koreans hold that as anything but a superstition then I would deny that. I have yet to meet a korean. including dog eaters, who has ever stated such a claim without a half smile on his or her face, alin to the smile my parents had when they told me the tooth fairy was gonna come and take my tooth.

  • Arghaeri

    I guess your gonna suggest we all give up samgyetang too because of the oft repeated superstition that it embues vigourous benefits at particular times of year.

  • http://samgukyusa.blogspot.com/ Yeongung

    Oh, great. I don’t check the Hole for a few days, and I miss out on a dog meat post!

    Personally, I love the stuff, and I love the reaction I get for being a non-Korean that eats it. I just wish the gov’t could finally regulate it.

    As for the whole stamina thing, well, I’d say insam-ju probably works better. Nudge nudge, wink wink.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    Babotaengi (#55): “That dog-eating Koreans are filthy curs?”

    Filthy? Why, not at all! Moreover, dogs are among the most wonderful of God’s creatures!

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • babotaengi

    I’ve had a Korean employer repeatedly insist it is scientific fact that consumption of dog-meat improves one’s health/stamina.

    I replied, no doubt with a half smile on my face, that I suppose it would be if you were lacking in protein and certain vitamins, but that tofu and vegetables would surely be equally beneficial.

    Despite my clear ignorance and unwillingness to “understand the science”, she never gave up on the possibility of educating me.

  • Awarren

    Arghaeri,

    Have you ever sat in on a dog dinner (whether you ate the dog or not), and listened in the Korean language a conversation taking place over such a dinner. On what are you basing your assumption that Koreans do not take the health myth seriously. A sheepish grin perhaps when a Korean is explaining it to you in broad daylight in English, knowing that YOU surely don’t believe?

  • Arghaeri

    I think I explained very clearly the basis, if your level of comprehension is so low you could not understand, then further elucidition will be of no help whatsoever.

    Now are you claiming that your one trip to a doggie restaurant is representative of all koreans who have or even have not eaten dog? If so good luck to you since I am unable to contest such logic, at least until my fits of laughter stop.

  • Arghaeri

    I’ve had a Korean employer repeatedly insist it is scientific fact that consumption of dog-meat improves one’s health/stamina.

    I’ve had an american that insisted that baseball is a masculine sport, and another who claimed that the Rev Moon is the new messiah, I’ve even heard of people who believe hot dogs are full of nutritious goodness, so whats your point exactly, that there are nutters out there who will believe anything?

    Tell me what has that got to do with their right to eat dog, lamb, beef or any other meat that they so choose?

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    Korea has made a lot of changes to its culture to join the modern world. Some of the changes I think have been far more drastic and profoundly altering to what was once a part of Korean identity than quitting eating dog meat would be. So why not just give it up, as have most other modern nations it wants to be including among?

    Name just one change in which Korea completely eliminated a choice rather than broadening the range of choices for its people.

    Sure, most Koreans wear Western clothing at this point. But no one prohibits anyone from wearing Western garb. Same goes with your example of Christianity — no one is forced to be a Christian in Korea, nor is any religion other than Christianity prohibited in Korea.

  • babotaengi

    “Tell me what has that got to do with their right to eat dog, lamb, beef or any other meat that they so choose?”

    Nothing. Who said it does? The woman in question is hardly raving mad. In the three years I’ve known her, she’s never seemed like anything but an average ajumma who works, goes to church and raises her kids as best she can. Don’t much care if she or anyone else eats dogs. Just pointing out that you are either ignorant or daft if you think Korean dog soup/meat lovers don’t believe there is something special about the dish.

  • DLBarch

    Part of being a mature, fully-developed country is having the confidence to tell the world, every once in a while, to mind its own fucking business, thank you very much.

    This dog meat issue is fundamentally a non-issue for anyone other than Koreans themselves to work out. Korea does not need to adopt every social norm or culinary convention of its western or international brethren to satisfy some neocolonialist demand to conform with the opinions of others.

    If the West wants to criticize Korea on issues that effect the larger international community, by all means, let it rip. But on issues that are entirely domestic in nature, this pathological missionary/Peace Corps impulse to tell the natives how to live their lives is obscene.

    Let Korea be Korea.

    DLB

  • Arghaeri

    Just pointing out that you are either ignorant or daft if you think Korean dog soup/meat lovers don’t believe there is something special about the dish.

    If you’re pointing out that some people think strange things then who exactly are you pointing it out to and why? Are you going to enter every topic and comment “you know I met this strange person once who believed……”. Do you think we don’t know there are strange people out there, and do you feel you have to inform us as we obviously thought the world was full of normal people only!

    If however, you’re pointing out that all or even most people who eat dogmeat believe that, as you seem to be suggesting with your “clarification” then you’re up there with the strange people you’re pointing out to us.

  • Arghaeri

    DLB, nicely put.

  • Awarren

    Arghaeri,

    What would you claim to be your level of Korean language proficiency?

  • Awarren

    And since you agree so strongly with DLB, what would be so wrong if Koreans did primarily eat dog because they feel it gives them more stamina and energy? Is it an insult against Koreans to imply such?

  • commander

    DLB nailed it.

  • Arghaeri

    Question

    Now are you claiming that your one trip to a doggie restaurant is representative of all koreans who have or even have not eaten dog?

    Answer

    Arghaeri, What would you claim to be your level of Korean language proficiency?

    I wouldn’t “claim” anything as its not relevant, since your the one claiming to know what all koreans belive based on overheard conversation on apparently, since not denied, just one visit to a doggy restaurant. accordingly only your ability in the language is relevant.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    It’s a doggy dog world . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • Arghaeri

    And since you agree so strongly with DLB, what would be so wrong if Koreans did primarily eat dog because they feel it gives them more stamina and energy?

    Nothing, exactly which part of my making that exact same point did you not understand,

    Tell me what has that got to do with their right to eat dog, lamb, beef or any other meat that they so choose?

  • gbnhj

    It’s a doggy dog world . . .

    Ha – you don’t know the truth aboutmurderous ways of cats! Basically, if you ever tried any of this ‘cage, beat and cook’ crap on a cat, you’d be in some real trouble. I wouldn’t be surprised if you woke up with a mouse head in your bed.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    It’s a catty-cat world . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • jk641

    gbnhj @88,

    ROFL!

  • Bendrix

    Great points, guys. I have some thinking to do about this topic.

    I feel like there must be some radical customs or laws that Korea as a nation has adopted to become modern and democratic, I’m just not aware of them. As a Korean American, I remember there being great pressure to be Christian, at least in my family and among Koreans we knew. But I guess this is not a rule, as someone pointed out above, but another option open to Koreans. I do distinctly remember my dad talking about boshingtang and its health benefits, though we never ate it, as far as I know. Unless my mom slipped some into the bindaedduk.