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Open Thread #262: Happy Chuseok

We here at the Marmot’s Hole would like to wish you all a happy and healthy Chuseok holiday.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    Happy Chuseok… I am just happy for a 5-day weekend!

  • jk641

    I am just happy for a 5-day weekend!

    Wow, that’s more like a week off.

    Happy Chuseok to all.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    Same here! Happy Chuseok!

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • paulhewson

    Happy Chu Seok everyone!

    God bless you and yours!

  • jkitchstk

    I forgot, is Chuseok like April Fools Day? Those Canadians are so funny…
    Ban Ki-Moon falls for Canadian radio prank
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/canada/9574965/Ban-Ki-Moon-falls-for-Canadian-radio-prank.html
    “This week it was the turn of Mr Ban to fall for their pranks. He was said to be in the middle of one of the 120 meetings he is holding with world leaders during the UN General Assembly when Mr Audette and Mr Trudel called pretending to be the Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper.
    The pair spoke in French and began by apologising to Mr Ban for sending his “lapdog” foreign minister John Baird to New York in his place.
    “Mr Harper” said he was too busy combing his hair with Krazy Glue to attend the UN General Assembly, a reference to the Mr Harper’s immaculate hairdo. Mr Ban appeared to become suspicious and asked: “Excuse me, am I speaking with Prime Minister Harper right now?”
    But the pair reportedly pressed on and asked Mr Ban to speak to the National Hockey League commissioner Gary Bettman to try to have a Quebec team returned to the league. The Quebec Nordiques were sold to Denver and became the Colorado Avalanche in 1995. ”

    Sorry, but I’ve gotta go call Ban, Ki-moon.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    I just shot a country wedding in the Queensland boonies and the grandparents, who must have been pushing 80, did the PSY dance to Gangnam-style. Things have now really gotten out of hand.

  • hamel

    hoju: was this at YOUR instigation or was this completely unprompted?

    Follow-up question: were there any Koreans, Asians or obvious K-pop fans at the wedding?

  • brier

    Jr and I had a great hike of Namsun. Had the taxi driver drop us off at the Hilton. Explored the new area recentl gamesy opened. Played traditional games at the top. Nice day nice weather.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    hamel: I was the photographer – the DJ put on the song, one of the youngsters (25ish?) started doing the PSY-dance, the crowd made an impromptu circle, and soon the grandparents joined in and started rocking the PSY-moves. There were hardly any Asians at the wedding at all. To be fair, the song is a regular on the radio here, was still pretty funny watching the geriatrics get into it.

  • iMe

    iPhone5 is really awesome. It looks and feels like a luxury item. Can’t say the same about Samsux, that’s for sure. But we did buy a new Samsux LED TV last week and I love it. Easily the best TV I’ve ever owned.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    What do you think of iMaps, iMe? I’ve been reading horror stories about imaginary roads and bridges to nowhere.

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    I just shot a country wedding in the Queensland boonies and the grandparents, who must have been pushing 80, did the PSY dance to Gangnam-style. Things have now really gotten out of hand.

    I guess it’s probably against your policy – but cold you show us one or two photos of the old banana-benders doing the Psy dance?

  • mickster

    Happy holidays. I guess that means more time for Korean folks to post here.

    As for Psy, Japanese press have belatedly started to report on his phonominon in the U.S.

    As for iMap horror stories, I hear a lot from my friends who are iWorshipers. However, I’m impressed how quickly Apple is fixing problems at least in Japan; most of the mistakes I heard or read about are gone. My main phone is a Japanese Android model, but I also own iPhone 4s and iPad2 upgraded to iOS6.

    Sorry, Tokyo’s purchase of Senkakus indirectly affected iPhone5 production in China. Rebellious workers there may have taken a cue from anti-Japan demonstrations :)

  • iMe

    @11
    I haven’t used it and I probably won’t use it anytime soon since 1) I know the city too well and 2) my car is already equipped with a very good GPS system.

    This phone is very light without feeling cheap. And thin. I loved my iPhone4 but now it feels heavy and clunky compared to this new model. And it’s FAST. And holding and using this phone, I think Apple made the right call in only increasing the length of the phone. It’s very, very sleek. And dare I say beautiful.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    Can anybody tell me exactly what they are?

    http://dok.do/HqZpml

    I know that are “vintage korean war badge medal insgnia” being
    sold on Ebay by somebody living in Uijeongbu-city, Kyunggi-do, Korea, South – who claims that they are “very rare/hard to find”

    But, before one commits 40,000won (item+postage) – can someone with knowledge give info one what they are exactly?

  • broona

    Mickster, the acceptance of your apology is dependent on whether you are full of remorse. Are you remorseful?

  • mickster

    Yes sir (mam?), I’ll keep that in mind.

  • broona

    Considering the male to female ratio here, I could see why you would want to address me as sir. However, since I am female, I guess I would have to be ok with “ma’am.” :)

  • mickster

    ma’am, not mam, my bad <– among the 50 ways Brits get irritated about.

  • Koreansentry

    Funny how only foreigners says “Happy Chuseok” when no Koreans don’t even say happy Chuseok. Koreans don’t celebrate Chuseok – it’s day for paying respect to Korean ancestors for good harvest and share foods with family and friends.

  • mickster

    Oh, so it’s like saying happy Obon to Japanese, I suppose.

  • gbnhj

    Not true, Koreansentry. Some of my friends have gone out over the past weekends to tend relatives graves, in preparation for this weekend. My next-door neighbors left yesterday (‘late in the game’) to do the same. Maybe it’s just that the people you know are less family-oriented or connected to tradition than others.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #22,
    Don’t forget the feast. If that’s not a celebration, then what is it?

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #20,
    “Funny how only foreigners says “Happy Chuseok” when no Koreans don’t even say happy Chuseok.”

    You don’t get the concept of communicative context, do you?

    It’s perfectly acceptable for English speaking foreigners who live in Korea to say “Happy Chuseok”, just as it’s perfectly acceptable for speakers of Korean to use one of the thousands of loan words and expressions from English when they speak amongst themselves.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #5,

    He was suspicious because he knew Stephen Harper is an even bigger ass than that.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    Funny how only foreigners says “Happy Chuseok” when no Koreans don’t even say happy Chuseok. Koreans don’t celebrate Chuseok – it’s day for paying respect to Korean ancestors for good harvest and share foods with family and friends.

    no Koreans don’t even say happy Chuseok..

    Hmm… they do say happy Chuseok – or they don’t say happy Chuseok?

    Most Korean people I associate with – ALL told me happy Chuseok the last few days… plenty of text messages from Korean friends telling me “Happy Chuseok” too.

    My boss, asked me if I would be returning home to see my family.

    My best friend (Korean) had to give his parents millions of KRW last week, so they could improve/refurbish their ancestors graves….

    which he is not too happy about – because they do it every year.

    the younger Koreans I know, all beg me to come to my house over Chuseok – because they “hate” going to their grandparents house to spend Chuseok, they would rather spend Chuseok at my house.

    other Koreans I know – are NOT going to the grandparents house this Chuseok – because they are too busy.

    as for me – I am a foreigner – but I was given so much wine and dok, I have enough wine to keep me intoxicated for one week.

    The dok – well I just give it away to random people – such as my apartment security guards etc – because I actually hate dok… its too dry and gluggy for me and has no taste.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    don’t get me wrong – I mainly eat Korean food – and find Korean food delicious – although often I wish it was more spicy and hot – as I find it’s not hot at all – but I just find eating dok the same as chewing on an eraser – same taste and texture.

  • Creo69

    Congrats to Samsung for taking the initiative to create a responsible work and social environment for Samsung employees. It is long over due but better late than never. Employees should be spending their free time at home with their families not drunk with co workers every evening.
    http://english.donga.com/srv/service.php3?biid=2012092037958

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    I hope other Korean companies and Koreans follow what Samsung is doing.

  • Creo69

    “I hope other Korean companies and Koreans follow what Samsung is doing.”

    Some other companies are making changes necessary to eliminate this behavior from their business culture as well. The Korean government has been working on this issue for a while and with the support of Samsung I am hopeful there will be some significant progress.

    One think I have always respected about Koreans is when they make up their mind to do something as a society they all get behind it and get the job done. Most people really don’t enjoy this culture of corporate drunkenness anymore and would prefer to partake in healthier alternatives so I think Korean society will get behind this movement…that is not to say it is going to change overnight :)

  • Anonymous_Joe

    What necessary changes are they making?

    For one, they could eliminate the drunk-room-sleep-it-off-cots and the work time they allow them to sleep off their hangovers.

    If one of my superstar employees came in hungover and unable to work, I too would forgive him. I would understand that on the day of his daughter’s wedding that he might celebrate a bit too much. …and I would let him get away with it once because he only has one daughter.

    Capisce?

  • Sr Noob

    What’s the more shocking example of crowd-sourced fundraising success – that bus monitor who got $700,000 after being bullied by school kids? Or Simon and Martina at Eat Your Kimchi getting $100,000 for their new studio?

    http://www.indiegogo.com/eatyourkimchistudio

  • CactusMcHarris

    #27,

    It’s even less flavourful than that – I used to think that if I could just enjoy it one time, there’d be at least a point to all the times I had to eat it for social reasons….but there has never been such a time. Not as downright awful as the Japanese natto, but, texture-wise, it’s close.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Sr Noob,

    Well, who says having a positive attitude on Korea doesn’t pay?

  • Avaast

    Here is a vastly improved version of Gangnam Style for your enjoyment:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6ZSZbNfSpk&feature=player_embedded

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    folks, this ‘gangnam style’ stuff is just crazy! did you know that there is an actual klingon langauge? below is a link to a well crafted video of a klingon singing ‘gangnam style’ in klingon. i want to stress the video is high in quality and sharply edited. i couldn’t stop laughing. it was just so nuts. check it, guys. over two million views. funny!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CayMeza487M

  • dogbertt

    HT to me: check today’s Architizer blog for a peek inside the Ryugyong Hotel.

  • CactusMcHarris
  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    I have been studying Classical Chinese using Paul Rouzer’s book, “A New Practical Primer of Literary Chinese.” He explains things very well, but the book is big and unwieldy.

    One of the things I like about the book is the Translation Exercises from Chinese to English and English to Chinese. One of the reasons I like them is that many of the sentences are unitentionally comical. Here are a few examples from today’s lesson:

    1) The bird raised its tongue and laughed. The fish was in the water and did not hear.
    鳥擧舌而笑. 魚在水而不聞

    2) The father wants to leave the house and drink in a tall tree.
    其父欲去家而飮於高樹

    3) Water that is shallow is not as good as trees that are tall.
    水之淺者不如樹之高者

    4) The bird roosted in a lofty tree for its own sake, whereas the fish abandoned shallow water for the sake of its children.
    鳥爲己宿高樹, 而魚爲其子去淺水

    By the way, I think Mr. Rouser mistranslated Sentence #4. I think it should be translated as follows:

    “Birds roost in tall trees for their own sake, but fish go to shallow water for the sake of their offspring.”

    去(거) can mean both “to go” or “to leave” or “to abandon.” Mr. Rouzer translated 去(거) as “abandoned,” but I think it should be “go to.”

    Birds build their nests in tall trees because it is safer for them and their offspring, but fish lay their eggs in shallow water, possibly to prevent their eggs from being eaten by other fish. However, by going to shallow water to lay its eggs, a big mother fish risks being caught or becoming stranded. Therefore, I think the “proverb” meant to say that a fish risks its life for its offspring, but a bird does not.

  • JK

    “By the way, I think Mr. Rouser mistranslated Sentence #4.”

    Damn it all to hell! Haven’t it already been established countless times on this blog, gbevers, that you do not know what you are talking about it when it comes to translating?? You’ve had to have been corrected several times by commenters here at the Marmot’s Hole who know the Korean language better than you (both the native Koreans as well as the non-Koreans who are fluent in the language) as well as the entire population of Korea itself. Now you’re trying to correct a translation of classical Chinese. For all we know, you may be right on this one…but your credibility was long ago shot when you mistranslated Korean frequently or complained about how a Korean TV commerical wasn’t written correctly, so you’ll understand if some of us take your “corrections” with a HUGE grain of salt.

  • JK

    Gbevers’ other completely wrong statements:
    “I simply said that using ‘그 친구’ in the commercial was ‘unnatural.’ Why? Because there was no antecedent. The commercial simply used it as a lead-in to “그런 친구처럼.”
    http://www.rjkoehler.com/2011/11/04/wonderful-ad-from-kyobo-life/

    Folks, do NOT take the Bevers seriously as a translator of Korean (or any other languages for that matter).

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    Gerry (#39), you might be interested in Ionesco’s play, La Cantatrice Chauve, translated from French as The Bald Soprano or The Bald Prima Donna.

    With such amusing lines as those you’ve found in the Chinese primar, you might consider composing your own one-act comic drama.

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    JK (#40, #41),

    First, you are a Korean-American (KA) who is ignorant of the Korean language, so go ask your beautiful Korean wife if there is anything wrong with what I wrote in Comment #39 instead of blathering on about past threads in which you, a KA ignorant of his mother language, think I was showhow proven wrong.

    Actually, I don’t think I have ever been wrong about anything here at the Marmot’s Hole. I know that bothers you and a lot of others, but I can’t help it. It’s a curse.

    Second, get a life and stop stalking me.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    Jeffery Hodges wrote (#42):

    Gerry (#39), you might be interested in Ionesco’s play, La Cantatrice Chauve, translated from French as The Bald Soprano or The Bald Prima Donna.

    These days I read only Korean, Chinese, and Spanish grammar books; Korean historical texts; my son’s middle school textbooks; and some of the novels that my 13-year-old son reads. I also read “The Hobbit” and the “Lord of the Rings” over and over again. In other words, I have stopped expanding culturally.

    Though I will probably never read the book, I appreciate your recommending it.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    2) The father wants to leave the house and drink in a tall tree.

    somehow – I think that is also a mis-translation.

    http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.kr/2012_10_01_archive.html

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    the people of eastern india tace their roots to the mongols. they feel kinship with koreans. the k-wave is massive there.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgBykbBp3rI

  • robert neff

    I guess there is more to the “kinship” than just the K-wave?
    http://www.rjkoehler.com/2010/02/26/india-the-origin-of-korea/

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    You should have used this one –

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rffiZw21CdA&feature=related

    the people of eastern india tace their roots to the mongols

    Did you look at where they are? Manipur –

    on a map – http://dok.do/HnmjkJ

    They are right under China and next to Burma and Nepal –
    http://dok.do/sksocq

    It is illegal for them to watch Bollywood – do the only romantic/love drama videos they can get are $1 smuggled in (with English subtitles) Korean drama.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    We all know Koreans is their past imported and married Indian females.

    so much for “pure” blood.

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    honestly, i have had only a casaul interest in kpop. yes, i have a few videos and up until recently, i had a few songs. this psy craze got me interested enough to start looking at the press in earnest. i typed in top 20 and got more than a few articles. i want to leave you with a link to a video from a group called b.a.p. it’s called ‘warrior’. listen, i’m middle-aged. it’s harder for me to get into this but get into it i did. i don’t know what to say. the video was so well made and the dance moves were second to none. i watched it intensely. that video really says it all; it really explains why k-pop has captured the hearts and imgination of so many people throughout asia. have yourself a look and give it a chance. i wanted to turn it off in the first 40 seconds. i’m glad i didn’t. the song rocks!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tLooPlf2Sw

    ps jaknani, does anything good ever happen to you?

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    How did I upset you this time – shouldn’t you be p.s.ing Beavers?

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    they have a fragile self-esteem and cannot handle criticism, and will often try to compensate for this inner fragility by belittling or disparaging others in an attempt to validate their own self-worth.

  • Creo69

    “In other words, I have stopped expanding culturally.”

    Gerry Bevers,

    Men who have your level of consistency of character are rare indeed…this is what makes you such a gem :)

  • TheKorean2

    JK, what do you expect from an ex-English teacher.

  • CactusMcHarris

    ‘ I have stopped expanding culturally. ‘

    So did moving to Texas come before or after that? Rick Perry approves that growth stop.

  • dogbertt

    @53: I agree. Keep it up Gerry.

  • Creo69

    “JK, what do you expect from an ex-English teacher.”

    Are you supposed to expect less from and “ex-English teacher” for some reason? I have done several jobs. Most paid better and some had more “prestige” in the eyes of society but I never had a job (including four years in corporate sales) where I learned as much about human nature as I did teaching English. And, I still encourage others who ask me about teaching English to do it. Teaching was one of the most rewarding experiences of my life and one I don’t regret for a second.

  • TheKorean2

    Creo69, I was talking about Gerry Bevers. This guy says he knows Hanja but he clearly doesn’t know both Hangul or Hanja accurately.

  • Creo69

    “Creo69, I was talking about Gerry Bevers. This guy says he knows Hanja but he clearly doesn’t know both Hangul or Hanja accurately.”

    People can say many things about Gerry. One thing you have to give him credit for though is the fact that he put forth the time and effort to learn Korean at a proficient level. In comparison to the thousands and thousands of foreigners who have spent some time living in South Korea and learned little or no Korean that puts Gerry in an elite class in my eyes. I certainly don’t agree with his opinions all the time, but having encountered difficulty myself learning enough Korean to get by comfortably on a day to day basis in Korea, I respect Gerry’s work ethic.

  • TheKorean2

    Creo69, believe me, he doesn’t know enough so he continues his distortion.

  • Creo69

    “Creo69, believe me, he doesn’t know enough so he continues his distortion.”

    I set up an Internet based business in Korean and had a very skilled translator do the work for me and one of my best Korean friends (who is highly proficient in English) double check the translation along with me. One thing I learned through this process is that some things are not easily translated from one language to another, especially when you are working alone. Gerry’s translations may or may not be perfect but I still give him an “A” for effort and also factor in that your interpretation of what an original text means may not be anymore correct than his.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    TheKorean2 wrote (#58):

    Creo69, I was talking about Gerry Bevers. This guy says he knows Hanja but he clearly doesn’t know both Hangul or Hanja accurately.

    I noticed you did not bother to correct anything. Why is that? Are you even Korean?

    Anyway, in appreciation for Creo and Dogbertt’s encouragement, I would like to share an epithany I had today in regard to reading hanmun.

    In 2009, on my “Korean Language Notes” blog, I posted the text below from the “Sa Ja So Hak” ( 四字小學), which was a Korean text used to teach Korean children Chinese characters and Chinese writing. The reason I posted it was that I was trying to teach myself Chinese writing and was curious about why the character 以(이) was used before some nouns, but after others.

    I assumed it was done intentionally to teach a difference in meaning, so I asked the a few of the Korean professors at my last school if they could not tell me the difference in meaning, included two who had majored in Classical Chinese writing in college. No one could tell me the difference, and all the Korean translations of the text I found translated them the same. The most common explanation I was getting was that the writer wrote it that way to show that 以(이) could be used before a noun and after a noun. I didn’t buy it, but I couldn’t figure it out until today.

    When used before a noun, 以(이) usually means “with.” In the “Sa Ja So Hak,” it was used before “clothes” and “food”:

    以衣溫我 (이의온아) – With (以 ) clothes (衣) [she] warmed (溫) me (我 ).

    以食飽我 (이식포아) – “With (以) food (食) [she] filled (飽) me (我)”

    The above is the most common way 以(이) is used, and it is the way Korean texts translate it even when it comes after the noun. However, I think 以(이) was meant to be translated differently in the text when it came after the nouns.

    In the text, 以(이) comes after “stomach” and “milk.” These nouns are different from the nouns clothes and food because they were part of the mother’s body. They were part of “her.” I think those parts of her body were “used to” do something. Therefore, I translated 以(이) as “was used.”

    腹以懷我 (복이회아) – [Her] stomach (腹) was used (以) to shelter (懷) me (我).

    乳以哺我 (유이포아) – [Her] milk (乳) was used (以) to feed (哺) me (我).

    I feel pretty proud of myself. Anyway, here is the complete passage:

    父生我身 (부생아신) – [My] father (父) gave life (生) [to] my (我) body (身).

    母鞠吾身 (모국오신) – [My] mother (母) raised (鞠) my (我) body (身).

    腹以懷我(복이회아) – [Her] stomach (腹) was used (以) to shelter (懷) me (我).

    乳以哺我(유이포아) [Her] milk (乳) was used (以) to feed (哺) me (我).

    以衣溫我 (이의온아) – With (以) clothes (衣) [she] warmed (溫) me (我).
    以食飽我 (이식포아) – With (以) food (食) [she] filled (飽) me (我).

    Now, JK, go ask your “highly educated Korean friends” (your wife) if I am right.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Yeah, Gerry’s got a good work ethic. Shame about the agenda.

  • JK

    Okay, here goes….

    Gbevers will get his response after this comment.

    Creo69, you’re giving a lot of credit to Gerry Bevers because of his supposed effort and “work ethic.” Please be sure to give the writers of fairytales who pass off their fairytales as truth with the same credit.

    I will later, if necessary, post several links to threads showing how, not only native Koreans, but commenters here at the Marmots Hole (both the native speakers as well as non-Korean speakers of the language, such as Oranckay) pointed out Bevers’ errors…and yet Bevers never once budged. (Give you a little hint, creo69, but I’ve dealt online with Bevers since 1999, and despite him being proven wrong time and time again, the man never once budged and admitted that he was wrong…EVER. That stubborness doesn’t make reality change and suddenly make him RIGHT…it just makes him look like an *ss.)

    I still remember his debate with Oranckay on this very blog where the word for “strike” (as in “hit”) was used, and Bevers mistranslated an old Korean document to say something about there not being a “striking island” (as in “what a STRIKING attraction”). In other words, Gerry Bevers was translating a Korean word that means “hit” or “strike” but was translating it as “stunning” because he was trying to do an exact Korean-to-English literal translation that was completely wrong. Now even YOU, Creo69, have to wonder about this sort of translation. Oranckay is MUCH more fluent at Korean than is Bevers, and he repeatedly corrected him. Bevers wouldn’t budge. Neither did this one kid I knew who INSISTED he saw the tooth fairy.

    I can post links to threads about Korean TV commercials where Bevers was THE ONLY PERSON ON THE PLANET who felt the way the Korean was being used was incorrect. I asked plenty of native Koreans about this, and they said nothing was wrong with it. Again, Korean and non-Korean speakers of the Korean language here on this blog pointed out that his critique of the commercial was unwarranted as the commercial was fine. IN OTHER WORDS, CREO69, HERE WAS SOMEONE WHO SAID EVERY KOREAN-SPEAKING COMMENTER AT THE MARMOT’S HOLE AS WELL AS THE ENTIRE KOREAN POPULATION WAS WRONG IN HOW THEY USED THE KOREAN LANGUAGE. AND HE WAS THE ONLY PERSON ON THE PLANET SAYING IT.

    Now pause and think carefully, creo69, and come to your own conclusion about that.

    Dogbertt, you can cheer for Bevers all you want, but ask native Koreans (for heaven’s sake, ask your wife) what you think of his translations. Don’t mention to any of these native Koreans that Gerry has always had an agenda; just ask them what you think of his translations and his critiques of TV commercial ads (remember this one?): http://www.rjkoehler.com/2011/11/04/wonderful-ad-from-kyobo-life/

    Still feel like cheering him on?

  • JK

    Creo,

    Let me add one extra anecdote to show how deliberate mistranslations can be (maybe) humorous (but dangerous if taken seriously by the person doing the mistranslating):

    Back in college, I had friends from South America with whom I used to practice speaking Spanish (as I had studied it for years in college). Keep in mind, I was a YOUNG kid with a dirty mind and a dirty mouth. Once, I spoke with this one guy and made a silly joke about how I, when I was having sex with my then-girlfriend, would make statements like “Voy a venir!” (“I’m going to c*m!”) The infinitive verb “venir” means “to come” or “to arrive.”

    Now I was just being plain silly (and not just about the sex comment but about how I was intentionally mis-translating the Spanish). Like Gerry Bevers (but as opposed to him I knew it was obviously wrong), I was mistranslating a word to make it a literal Spanish-to-English interpretation. Heck, the official dictionaries all backed me up on this one because “venir”, as I said, means “to come”, so if I had used some Gerry Bevers logic, I could have argued till the end of the world that I was right in my use of the expression and that every Spanish-speaking person on the planet was wrong to say I was mis-using the word “venir.” That wouldn’t have made me right, Creo69.

    Likewise, Gerry Bevers has made mistakes with his “translations” of Korean TV commercials or documents. Now keep in mind, Creo69, no one agrees with him, not a native Korean or any of the commenters here at the Marmot’s Hole who are completely fluent in Korean. But just like 1999, Bevers wouldn’t budge on where he stood.

    But standing your ground on something that is wrong about a language when all the native speakers disagree with you and continually making your mistranslations and never actually improving is not something that should be associated with “work ethic.” It’s called not learning from those who know better and insisting your usage of the language, which is not your own, is correct and that everyone else who speaks the language is wrong.

    I once wrote this to Bevers, Creo69. I think it appropriate here:

    “Imagine this: How stupid would a native Korean, who was learning English as a Second Language, look if he saw articles in the NY Times or Wall Street Journal and talked about how the articles were poorly written and that Americans did not know how to write their own language in a clear, concise style? How stupid would this native Korean look if he made suggestions as to how to the articles SHOULD be written in English…but the result of his work was awkward (as if it was written by Yoda after drinking a 12-pack of beer and smoking crack) to the average educated American reader? Then suppose this native Korean angrily criticizes any native English speaking American for criticizing his work and says that Americans who think his edits are awkward or wrong just don’t know the English language???

    “And during all this, suppose also this native Korean speaker had no one, either online or offline, to support his writing edits?

    “He’d look like an ass, no?

    “Now look at yourself, Bevers.”
    http://www.rjkoehler.com/2011/12/08/leaker-of-miss-a-sex-video-identified/

  • dogbertt

    JK, my proficiency in the Korean language is light years beyond yours, and that of 99% of kyopos I’ve ever met.

    That said, if you’ve been stalking Gerry for 13 years, you’d already know that I’ve disagreed with Gerry on numerous points regarding the language. Specifically, I think he has a tin ear for how Korean is spoken colloquially.

    Nonetheless, I like Gerry very much and respect him. Unlike you and others, I don’t feel the need to belittle him or harass him.

  • JK

    No, dogbertt, you’re only okay if Gerry belittles and harrasses the entire Korean people (which would include your wife…and half your kids).

  • Charles Tilly

    Thanks. You can shut your fucking mouth now.

  • JK

    Up yours, d*ckwad.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    Hoju wrote (#63):

    Yeah, Gerry’s got a good work ethic. Shame about the agenda.

    Let me describe my philosophy to you and others, Hoju, with this little poem:

    My goals are truth and fairness.
    My motivators ignorance and deceit.
    My methods are honesty and directness.
    My motto is never retreat.

    My agenda is set by the brazenness
    Of those who lie through their teeth.
    My resolve is tireless pursuit–unless,
    I’m tired or looking for something to eat.

    Actually, when it comes to the Korean language, I like to challenge people to challenge me. My purpose is to learn.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    Thank you, Dogbertt. I’m not used to compliments.

  • Creo69

    JK,

    Stubbornness and an inability to EVER admit to his mistakes? These are Gerry’s sins? I think you just helped lead me to a deeper understanding of my fondness for Gerry and Koreans in general who seem to take such great pride in the possession of these human characteristics.

  • JK

    Soooo….now this is about Koreans? Why didn’t you just say so.

    Is the stubborness of Koreans justification for putting up with a guy (who is almost always wrong) at the Marmot’s Hole because it’s a slap back at the entire Korean race?

    I guess my point is…how does posting mistranslations on the Marmot’s Hole (a blog of non-Korean expats, native Koreans, though not all that many, and people of various countries interested in Korean affairs relate to the supposed stubborness of Koreans? Please explain. You seem to be saying that because Koreans are supposedly stubborn that Gbevers can post whatever mistranslations he wants…and that people like you will give him kudos for it.

  • dogbertt

    JK, you’re an ass and a disturbed e-stalker. Go back to ignoring me and I’ll return the favor.

  • JK

    Good job, dogbertt. Leave me with an insult and call for peace. Go back to your weight-watching program. I take joy in knowing that you can only be racist (like in the old days when you made references to people with flat faces) to HALF your kids now.

  • Creo69

    JK,

    I guess the point I am trying to make is that I am apparently not half the Nazi you are….Gerry can write and post whatever the fuck he wants…you can choose to agree with it or not. Koreans seem to think they they have a right to create a global media campaign voicing their version of the truth…Gerry and the rest of the world have the same right. I am not even in Korea and when I opened the newspaper this morning the first thing I see is some article about fucking Dokdo…as if it were actually news or something.

  • Seth Gecko

    Some other companies are making changes necessary to eliminate this behavior from their business culture as well. The Korean government has been working on this issue for a while…

    Yeah, I remember the SK government’s “gifts for workers who promise not to visit brothels” initiative of ’06.

  • Creo69

    JK,

    Maybe you and I have a very different view on life. I certainly enjoyed living in Korea but I would NEVER want to be a Korean. Mainly because I would never want to be a citizen of a country where people like Gerry do not have the freedom to speak their mind even if they may be wrong or simply crazy. I am intelligent enough to make my own assessments without a government doing it for me.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    Creo wrote (#72):

    Stubbornness and an inability to EVER admit to his mistakes? These are Gerry’s sins?

    But I do admit my mistakes when I make them, and I make a lot. However, it is not a mistake to have a traditional point of view in regard to Korean grammar and style.

    Dogbertt wrote that he thought I had a tin ear when it came to Korean colloquial style of speech. I am not sure what he meant by that, but a Korean newspaper reporter, for example, should not be using adjectives as verbs, even if it is used that way colloquially.

    Americans frequently make ungrammatical sentences, but is that something that should just be accepted? Should American English teachers stop marking those as mistakes simply because many Americans make them? Why even bother teaching grammar if people are simply going to excuse grammar mistakes as colloquial speech?

    People like, JK, accuse me of not admitting my mistakes when they are actually the ones making the mistakes.

    For example, in the link JK posted above, Hamel and others tried to convince me that the adjective 외롭다 (lonely) could be made into a verb by adding ~어 하다. When I explained that 외로워하다 was ungrammatical, they pointed to a song in which it was used. I pointed to the dictionary and showed it was not listed. Someone responded with, “Not everything is in the dictionary.”

    In other words, by my refusing to accept “외로워하는 나는” as a replacement for “외로운 나는,” I was judged by ignorant people like JK as being wrong and unable to admit my mistake.

    Dogbertt and others may accept 외로워하다 as a colloquial expression, but my tin ear and my dictionary tell me that it is not only wrong, but also adds nothing to the language. Why use seven syllables and say “외로워하는 나는” when you can simply use five and say “외로운 나는”?

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    Creo wrote (#77):

    I would never want to be a citizen of a country where people like Gerry do not have the freedom to speak their mind even if they may be wrong or simply crazy.

    HEY! I’m not crazy.

  • JK

    Creo69 wrote:

    “Maybe you and I have a very different view on life. I certainly enjoyed living in Korea but I would NEVER want to be a Korean. Mainly because I would never want to be a citizen of a country where people like Gerry do not have the freedom to speak their mind even if they may be wrong or simply crazy. I am intelligent enough to make my own assessments without a government doing it for me.”

    Umm…..Creo, I think we’re getting to the crux of the issue: The Marmot’s Hole is not the country of Korea (even if it may be ABOUT Korea) and no one asked you to be Korean!

    By all means, Gerry Bevers has the right to post whatever misinterpretations and mistranslations he wants and can say Koreans are supposedly screwing up the Korean language just as a Korean in America is free to post mistranslations from Korean to English or vice-versa and tell all Americans how ignorant they are with the English language. That does not make the person or the translation CORRECT, however.

    No Korean government is telling Bevers anything. Geez…he simply made more than a few errors because he obviously does not know Korean that well. Many of us do not. Having said that, why does he fight the native speakers of the language when they point out that he is wrong when using their own language?

    That’s not freedom he’s practicing; that’s just plain out stubborness and stupidity. And how you brought the Korean government into this discussion, I don’t know.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    I would like to revise my poem in Comment #70 as follows:

    My Philosophy

    My goals are truth and fairness.
    My motivators ignorance and deceit.
    My methods are honesty and directness.
    My motto is never retreat.

    My agenda is set by the brazenness
    Of those who lie through their teeth.
    My resolve is tireless pursuit–unless,
    I’m tired or want to eat.

    by Gerry Bevers

  • Creo69

    ” why does he fight the native speakers of the language when they point out that he is wrong when using their own language?”

    In my opinion, the Korean language has been butchered by Koreans over the years and just because someone is a native speaker doesn’t mean they are right. I worked with two different Korean co teachers at the high school I worked most recently who would ask the students if something was correct in Korean or not. Each time this occured (frequently) I could have left to go make coffee while they argued about what was right and what wasn’t. It seems to me that there is a lot of ambiguity which exists in modern Korean language.

  • JK

    Creo69 wrote @76:

    “JK,

    “I guess the point I am trying to make is that I am apparently not half the Nazi you are….Gerry can write and post whatever the f*ck he wants…”

    And others have the right to correct him. Your point is?

    Creo69, if a native Korean were to post erroneous post after post mistranslating English into Korean and said over and over again that the problem with Americans is that they’re screwing up their own language, I and others would comment back to that person that he/she does not know what the hell he/she is talking about. That does not make me a Nazi, Creo boy.

    “…you can choose to agree with it or not. Koreans seem to think they they have a right to create a global media campaign voicing their version of the truth…Gerry and the rest of the world have the same right.”

    How this got on the discussion of “Koreans” is beyond me. You projecting here from some past pain, Creo69? Gerry posted a critique of how native Koreans used the Korean language. You’re getting your panties all in a wad over the fact that others (including NON-Koreans at the Marmot’s Hole) corrected Gbevers on his usage of Korean and then go off on “Koreans.” Why not go off on the non-Koreans here who have corrected Gerry Bevers time and time again?

    “I am not even in Korea and when I opened the newspaper this morning the first thing I see is some article about fucking Dokdo…as if it were actually news or something.”

    Not sure what that has to do with this discussion.

  • JK

    Creo69 wrote:
    “In my opinion, the Korean language has been butchered by Koreans over the years”

    Obviously, the English language has been butchered by Americans (and other Westerners) over the years as well. Of course, instead of saying “been butchered” I prefer the word “evolved.” That happens with time, Creo69. The American English language is far different than what it was a century or more ago. I guess it also was “butchered.” Most languages are with time.

    “…and just because someone is a native speaker doesn’t mean they are right. I worked with two different Korean co teachers at the high school I worked most recently who would ask the students if something was correct in Korean or not. Each time this occured (frequently) I could have left to go make coffee while they argued about what was right and what wasn’t. It seems to me that there is a lot of ambiguity which exists in modern Korean language.”

    Okay. But you’re stating that only one native Korean had a problem with it. Plenty of native Koreans as well as commenters here on this blog, both the Koreans as well as the non-Koreans, had problems with Bevers’ translations and critiques of Korean TV ads due to supposed grammatical mistakes. There doesn’t seem to be much disagreement when the score is 50 million plus (including people at this blog) to 1.

    Why not try showing this ad to several native Koreans and ask them if there is any problem with how the Korean language is used: http://www.rjkoehler.com/2011/11/04/wonderful-ad-from-kyobo-life/

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    “Americans frequently make ungrammatical sentences, but is that something that should just be accepted? Should American English teachers stop marking those as mistakes simply because many Americans make them? Why even bother teaching grammar if people are simply going to excuse grammar mistakes as colloquial speech?”

    Good point! Follow the lead of grammarians. But . . .

    I know I ain’t supposed to use “ain’t” for “am not” — I’m supposed to use “aren’t,” aren’t I? or am I not? . . . I’m not sure.

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Excellent editorial by a naturalized Japanese citizen in the Japan Times:

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/fl20121002ad.html

    Money quote:

    “I will conclude with the thoughts of M.G. Sheftall, professor of modern Japanese cultural history at Shizuoka University:

    ‘Postwar Japan wanted to be welcomed back into the community of responsible countries and membership in the United Nations. So as a condition, the government acknowledged a ‘we were wrong’ narrative of the war experience. I think bearing guilt for a few more generations for the 20 million Asians killed under Japanese imperialism is necessary before the words ‘army’ or ‘navy’ inevitably return to the official Japanese lexicon. It’s just the decent thing to do.’”

  • Q

    Article by a half-Japanese American living in Japan almost 30 years:

    http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article36817.html

    Why are people so jealous of these Korean success stories? I am happy and pleased to see guys like PSY and companies like Samsung doing so well. Competition is healthy and competition makes us all up the quality of our game. Those who chatter and grouse only show their immaturity and lack of self-reflection and professionalism…. We need to learn from them because, well, as they say, “the best revenge is success” and it seems the Koreans are doing quite nicely thank you.

    I really hate to say this because I am half-Japanese, but, sometimes I think MacArthur was right when he said, “Japan is a nation of twelve-year-olds.”

    If the Japanese don’t snap out of it and get with the program and start all dedicating their efforts to the success of the project, rather than protection of their position, they’re going to become a nation of very poor twelve-year-olds.

  • Q

    Mike Roger, in some way, complimented Korea too much and was too harsh to Japanese to make his point. He wrote that he saw lots of Japanese infighting among three or four factions for power in Japanese companies whilst Koreans work together for a goal of ‘Korea vs. world.’ My perception is that Japanese are a lot better than Koreans at being united for communal causes and Koreans have factions almost everywhere.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    “My perception is that Japanese are a lot better than Koreans at being united for communal causes and Koreans have factions almost everywhere.”

    I second that. Koreans are always back stabbing one another.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Colonel Young Ok Kim said of Koreans, vs. the Japanese (and I paraphrase):

    “I think we Koreans are individually more talented than the Japanese, but we are always fighting each other, whereas the Japanese are more united.”

  • Q

    As for the Japanese jealousy and hatred toward Korean success stories, I do see it a lot at 2ch and searchina and occasionally at right-wing media Sankei shimbun. On the other hand, I cannot say that it is only Japanese who have jealousy and hatred toward neighbors’ achievements.

    Considering Girls’ Generation’s ‘Oh!’ (Japanese ver.) could win triple crown at Oricon chart and Nakashima Mika’s Yuki no Hana(눈의 꽃Korean ver.) could win so much popularity in Korea, Japanese and Koreans seem to have more friendly communication. Anyhow people of both nations still visit each other a lot.

  • Q

    Japanese and Koreans seem to be able to have more friendly communication….

  • RolyPoly

    gbevers,
    Since this is 추석, I am going to give you some Korean test. Do not cheat.
    1) What is the meaning of 적반하장?
    2)translate: “나는 이집안에 태어난 사대 독자 인 동시에 장손으로써 아버지의 전재산을 상속 받아도 마땅하다는 사람들의 이야기를 듣지 않기로 마음먹었으나 형편이 이를 허락하지 않으니 부득불 잠시 불효를 저지르고 난뒤 후에 가족들에게 양해를 구하려 합니다만 이또한 옳지 않은 행동이므로 어찌할바를 몰라 여기서 잠시 생각에 빠져있던중 지나가던 행인이 나에게 컴맹인 자기를 도와 인터넷을 서치해 달라기에 나또한 문과 졸업자임으로 헬프해줄수 없다고 말하자 이자는 야수로 돌변하여 뒤질랜드 묻기에 너나잘하세요로 상대 주었다”

  • Q

    It took four years for this expat’s youtube video win media coverage in Korea.

    http://news.nate.com/view/20121004n00577?mid=n0411

    I agree with him and hope Korean toilet culture change soon.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    My Philosophy

    My goals are truth and fairness.
    My motivators ignorance and deceit.
    My methods are honesty and directness.
    My motto is never retreat.

    My agenda is set by the brazenness
    Of those who lie through their teeth.
    My resolve is tireless pursuit–unless,
    I’m tired or want to eat.

    by Gerry Bevers

    You’re writing poems about yourself now Gerry?

    빈 수레가 요란하다

  • Creo69

    “Obviously, the English language has been butchered by Americans (and other Westerners) over the years as well.”

    Sure…but the damage done by “Westerners” is minuscule compared to the damage that has been done by others throughout the world … my prediction is that by the time a billion Chinese get done studying the English language it won’t even remotely resemble the language it is today. Sad but true.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    OK, can somebody summarize what I missed?

  • Creo69

    “OK, can somebody summarize what I missed?”

    Gerrry very naughty boi…

  • yuna

    can somebody summarize what I missed?

    It ain’t pretty.
    An old man wrote something unseenly, that if translated directly, could be set to a theme tune to a Korean transformer-robot TV cartoon.

  • yuna

    unseemly

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    Hoju wrote (#96):

    You’re writing poems about yourself now Gerry?

    You were my muse, Hoju (#63), my motivator.

  • JK

    Robert Koehler @98:

    Somehow (and I don’t know how) Creo69 thinks the Korean government is stopping Bevers from posting mistranslations.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    #88

    Article by a half-Japanese American living in Japan almost 30 years:

    http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article36817.html

    Why are people so jealous of these Korean success stories? I am happy and pleased to see guys like PSY and companies like Samsung doing so well.

    he wrote that in 1982?

    or he left Japan 30 years ago – lived a while in Korea and then the USA – ……….

    hey is the writer you?

  • dokdoforever

    Rolypoly is guilty of a run on sentence.

  • RolyPoly

    Here is more difficult one.
    3)Translate: 명동을 거닐다가 꼭 삐끼처럼 차려입은놈의 명찰을 보니 장동건이라 써있길래 니가 무슨..정형돈이네 라며 웃었더니 그자리에서 않좋을때 들으면 더 않좋은 노래 불렀다. 일하는데 물좋으냐 물으니 물 엄청 좋습니다 놀러 오세요 하길래 요즘은 얼마씩 받냐 물으니 기본이 칠만원 이라 했다.

  • DLBarch

    In the “I don’t know whether to laugh or cry” department, I’d say it’s time to throw in the towel when one of my favorite magazines carries a 9-page (!) story on K-pop:

    http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/10/08/121008fa_fact_seabrook

    The jaw drops.

    DLB

  • Creo69

    “Somehow (and I don’t know how) Creo69 thinks the Korean government is stopping Bevers from posting mistranslations.”

    Hmm…I think my point went over your head…not surprised though. Let me make it a little bit clearer. As Americans, me and Gerry can say pretty much anything about anyone we want (with the exception of “bomb” in an airport and a threat against the President) without repercussions. Hell…if we want to pledge allegiance to North Korea…or god forbid…hurt someone’s feelings on a blog we can do that. Try either in South Korea, you can and will either be imprisoned or sued.

    Like I said, I would NEVER want to be a Korean and the restrictions on freedom of speech are just one of many reasons for that.

  • Creo69

    “OK, can somebody summarize what I missed?”

    Not much… JK is simply continuing to “romance” Gerry…something he has been doing since 1999? JK….NINETEEN FUCKING NINETY NINE? Why don’t you too just get married and get on with it.

  • Creo69

    opps :) “two”

  • JK

    So let me see if I understand the flow of your arguments:

    1. Gerry has the right to post his mistranslations. No one denied that. But I pointed out that he had no one to back him up (if anything everyone pointed out to him that he was wrong) in his usage of the Korean language.

    2. In response, you say wouldn’t want to be Korean. You also say, “I am intelligent enough to make my own assessments without a government doing it for me.” Right out of left field.

    3. I’m still trying to figure out how you brought up #2 in response to #1.

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    As Americans, me and Gerry can say pretty much anything about anyone we want (with the exception of “bomb” in an airport and a threat against the President) without repercussions.

    Try visiting New York, get up to 135th and Lenox, point at every African American who is passing by and yell at the top of your lungs: “damn dirty ni***r, go back to Africa.” Enjoy the absence of repercussions.

  • Creo69

    Jk

    1. Again, who cares (I think this is the fifth time I said this). I don’t really get the impression Gerry is here because he is seeking your approval…if that is what you have been wairing for since 1999 you might want to consider moving on to a new obsession.
    2. You are using my comments out of context by leaving out my statement about not wanting to be a citizen in a country where people like Gerry are not allowed to voice an opposing opinion to the irrational public sentment of the day…If you live in Korea try mentioning that you have some doubts about who Dokdo belongs too…see how that goes. And yes, the Korean govt does limit the speech of citizens on certain topics.
    3. If you can’t figure it out now maybe you can stalk me for a decade or so like you have Gerry. I will be honest with you and let you know right up front that I can tell you are not my type…in other words…save your affections and obsessions for Gerry. Twat.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    JK wrote (#111):

    Gerry has the right to post his mistranslations.

    You are unqualified to judge my Korean translations, JK, because when you were in Korea, you spent all of your time drinking, sleeping with your Korean coworkers, and then bragging about your sexual conquests online instead of trying to learn your mother language.

    You were just one of those Korean-American, party-boy scumbags who came to Korea to get as much Korean puntang as you could while ridiculing your Korean male coworkers. You knew almost nothing about Korean History or the Korean language and didn’t care to learn.

    How do I know all of this? Because you used to come onto the Korea Times online forum drunk after your partying and brag about it. No one could get you to shut up, not even your female friend on the forum who repeatedly asked you to stop posting that kind of crap.

    And even after all these years, you still cannot speak the Korean language, in spite of marrying a Korean women.

    Just admit it, JK, I’m more Korean than you are.

  • Creo69

    ” Try visiting New York, get up to 135th and Lenox, point at every African American who is passing by and yell at the top of your lungs: “damn dirty ni***r, go back to Africa.” Enjoy the absence of repercussions.”

    TheKorean…I am sure you are a brilliant lawyer (maybe even a “legend” in your own mind) but you have also proven yourself to be a pathetic racist as well, crawl back to your own blog.

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    you have also proven yourself to be a pathetic racist as well

    Nothing makes my day quite like a racist calling me racist.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    Dokdoforever (#105) is guilty of a missing hyphen.

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • Q

    Wow, the video @ #95 must get vial, I mean, among Japanese. The Copromaniac Japanese are swarming in the comment box.

  • Q

    psy’s concert last night at the City Hall in Seoul:

    http://youtu.be/Ixsn81SqU6E

    I like the citizens voluntarily cleaning up the Seoul Plaza after the concert:

    http://news.nate.com/view/20121005n00384

  • Arghaeri

    What make you think it was voluntary, I heard that Psy threatened to do an “encore”.

  • Creo69

    ” Nothing makes my day quite like a racist calling me racist.”

    Any time you can provide some examples of my racism I would love to see them…I will be waiting…a long timeeee.

  • Q

    You might be right if you heard it from a direct source. I was not there. But the news article says:

    시민들이 콘서트가 끝난 후 서울광장에서 자발적으로 (voluntarily) 쓰레기를 줍고 있다.

  • judge judy

    you hit the nail on the head, gerry.

  • Arghaeri

    I think that went over your head Q.

  • JK

    To creo69 @113:

    Holy moly! And here I’ve done my best to forget the decades-old stereotype/cliche of the not-so-bright North American ESL teacher in Korea. Dude, you STILL don’t get it!

    You wrote:
    “You are using my comments out of context by leaving out my statement about not wanting to be a citizen in a country where people like Gerry are not allowed to voice an opposing opinion to the irrational public sentment of the day…If you live in Korea try mentioning that you have some doubts about who Dokdo belongs too…see how that goes. And yes, the Korean govt does limit the speech of citizens on certain topics.”

    Let me see if I get this: Gerry had mistranslated some Korean phrases and had no one to support him, neither among native Koreans NOR among any people at the Marmot’s Hole, including non-Korean people who are fluent in Korean. How in heck this got into the issue of how the Korean government restricts free speech is beyond me.

    No one said you needed to be a Korean citizen! Holy crap, where did that come from?!? And then you cited your freedom to say whatever you want and that the US gov’t won’t do anything due to your free speech. Then TheKorean wrote @112: ” Try visiting New York, get up to 135th and Lenox, point at every African American who is passing by and yell at the top of your lungs…” some racial eptaphs. His point, which you obviously missed (were you really an ENGLISH teacher if you missed this point?) was that EVERYONE of EVERY so-called democratic country has restrictions on what their citizens can say. You bringing up how someone cannot say something that goes against the Korean gov’t’s view on Dokdo due to some sort of peer pressure or gov’t pressure and implying it’s somehow worse than in America (where one CANNOT say certain things without serious repurcussions, as TheKorean was pointing out) was beyond lame and stupid. I mean how does Dokdo even RELATE to the fact that Gerry disagreed with the entire Korean population, as well as Korean-speaking commenters here at the Marmot’s Hole, over a Korean translation? Geez, you’re dense…

  • JK

    Gerry, your memory must be fading.

    I never had any woman at the Korea Times to tell me to stop posting my comments. I just don’t do that anymore. That was 1999. I’ve moved on.

    I studied a decent amount of Korean while living in Korea. I also worked hard. I also partied hard. I also never lost a job.

    Why is it whenever anyone, but particularly a native Korean or a Korean-American, points out your mistakes in translating that you get personal and insulting toward said person? When it came to your critique of that Kyobo ad, you had the entire Korean population, as well as people at the Marmot’s Hole, who disagreed with you. You were the ONLY one to criticize the usage of the Korean language in the commercial. Then to any native Korean who corrected you, you became insulting. Does this somehow make you right???

    Yes, I am at a pretty good place in life, Bevers. Yes, I slept with women during my stay several years ago in Korea. But it’s you who constantly bring it up on this blog, not me. And yes, now I sleep with one and only one woman. Any other questions about my personal life?

    You say you know the Korean language better than me. I used to think so, until I saw some of your shoddy translations. You say you know Korean history better than me. Geez, based on the fact that you believe Korea helped Japan as a willing ally in WWII, that Koreans welcomed the colonization, that the Comfort Women were willing prostitutes that had what was coming to them, and that you ignore several important pieces of history about Dokdo while touting the right-wing Japanese line, I sincerely doubt that.

    Anyway, I will stay on this blog and continue to point out your errors. I’ll continue to ask my native Korean friends to read over your written Korean and I’m sure I’ll continue I’ll hear them say again, “No, that guy does not know how to write in Korean. That was really awkward!” And in return, you’ll just be insulting back to me and anyone else who corrects your mistranslations, as if that will somehow make you right.

    But it won’t, Gerry. Always remember that.

  • JK

    Judgejudy @123:

    Gerry didn’t hit sh*t. He just got insulting when anyone questions his language ability.