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Korean-Americans back Obama: survey

A report by the National Asian American Survey reveals that Korean-Americans back Obama over Romney, 49% to 20%, reports the Chosun.

Ouch.

You can read a summary of the report on Asian-American political opinions here. Just a sample:

- Among likely voters, 43 percent of Asian Americans support Barack Obama, while 24 percent prefer Romney. There are considerable differences by ethnic group: Indian Americans show the strongest support for Obama (68 percent), and Samoans and Filipinos show strongest support for Romney (39 percent and 38 percent, respectively).

- Democrats have a 33 percent to 14 percent advantage among Asian Americans, but a majority of Asian Americans (51 percent) are Independent or do not identify with the U.S. party system. This figure is higher than the average for the national population (40 percent).

- Hmong, Indian and Korean Americans most strongly identify with the Democratic Party. In a significant shift, Filipino Americans now have the strongest identification with the Republican Party, a designation that has previously consistently belonged to Vietnamese Americans.

One wonders if these numbers reflect a permanent shift or the simple fact that Romney comes off as a complete tool, especially compared to Obama.

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  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    The sad part is that Mitt Romney is an admirable person. There are so many stories of his personal generosity, both time and money, when someone has needed help. Mitt shows up to cut the grass. We’ve never been treated to a single anecdote recounting Barack Obama’s personal generosity with anyone; believe me, if one existed, we would have heard about it again and again and again. It would be required reading.

  • Wedge

    BC: You miss the point: A guy whose very presence in the White House reverses the growth of oceans doesn’t need to do individual charity–all of us bask in the glow of his beneficence every day.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    Obama is the annointed, hes the platonic guardian and we as the mere commoners must never question his goodness. Personally, I dont like either guy and wouldn’t vote for either of the major party candidates because I don’t think there is any essential difference between these two. Oh eys, they have different philosophies, and more importantly, different special interests to pander to, but both are agreed on this point: it is the legit role of the president to use the coercive power of government to shower those who support them with as many privileges as possible. Both are very much for increasing the power of government and its reach into the lives of people and both do not trust you or me to be able to make sound decisions without the helping hand of government to guide us along. Both will increase the debt, both will shovel wealth towards favored ends, both will continue to print the currency into oblivion as both will require more money to pursue their goals of bigger government. Don’t trust Romney or Ryan to be conservative, Ryan will pay lip service to small government ideas but the guy is a pathological liar. This is a sham election. There are the insiders who receive and the outsiders who pay and guess what, whoever wins this, no one here will be their insider.

  • silver surfer

    Is Bain Capital a maker or a taker?

  • Jashin Densetsu

    http://www.wnd.com/2012/09/the-probability-os-birth-certificate-is-genuine/

    “Defenders of Mr. Community Organizer say each error could have just happened by accident. I mean, it’s government form-filling, right?

    But here’s where the math comes in. If each error is a genuine accident, the errors are independent events, so the probabilities of each error are multiplied together to determine the probability that all occurred in one document.

    Thus the odds against all of these errors occurring in a single document except by design are 1 in 100 x 100 x 10 x 10 x 25 x 40 x 25 x 25 x 10 x 100 x 100 x 100 x 100.

    Accordingly, the probability that Mr. Obama’s birth narrative is in substance true is no better than 1 in 62,500,000,000,000,000,000, or 0.0000000000000000000016. That probability is what we mathematicians describe as “vanishingly different from zero.”

    Don’t be misled by the simplicity of the method. It’s simple but sound. The result is solid.

    The probability that the certificate is false is 1 minus the probability that it is genuine. Any mathematician would have to agree under oath that if the odds against each error have been fairly stated, and if the errors are genuinely independent of one another, then it is very, very nearly certain that the “birth certificate” is a forgery.”

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    We’ve never been treated to a single anecdote recounting Barack Obama’s personal generosity with anyone; believe me, if one existed, we would have heard about it again and again and again. It would be required reading.

    You need to read more, write less.

    “Romney and his wife, Ann, gave 29.4 percent of their income to charity in 2011, donating $4,020,772 out of the $13,696,951 they took in. Obama and first lady Michelle Obama gave 21.8 percent of their income to charitable organizations last year, donating $172,130 out of the $789,674 they made.”

    Further:

    While running for president Romney seems to have suddenly found his inner philanthropist. As George Zornick reports (quoting Romney’s trustee, Brad Malt), “Over the entire 20-year period period [of 1990-2009, the Romneys gave to charity an average of 13.45 percent of their adjusted gross income.” To be a Mormon in good standing one must donate 10 percent of one’s gross income to the Mormon church. If Romney did so, that means he gave only 3.45 percent of his vast fortune to all other charities.

    Finally, there is the question of whom Romney gives his money to. Business Insider ran the numbers : “The answer appears to be primarily one organization: The Church of Jesus Christ Of Latter-Day Saints, more commonly known as the Mormon church. According to tax documents viewed by Business Insider , the vast majority of the money Mitt Romney gave away in 2009 and 2010—80 percent of it—went to the church.”

    So Mitt gives a lot of money to his wacko church (he has to, or he won’t go to the Highest Kingdom of Heaven – no I didn’t just make that up). Good for him – the man has already amassed a quarter of a billion dollars, he can afford to sprinkle his earnings anywhere he wants. But let’s not pretend he “shows up to cut the grass”. He couldn’t care less.

    Now the Obamas – and I’m actually pretty neutral on Hopey, if I’m fair – have less than 1% of Admirable Mitt’s wealth. In 2007, for example, the Obamas gave $240,000 to charity. That’s a lot of dough, particularly when you weigh up their net worth.

  • tapadamornin

    There are a million policies that President Obama should be wholeheartedly criticized for, but can we just make it official and hope the birthers go seal themselves in a garage somewhere and treat themselves to a lit’o’bit of the carbon monoxide?

    The fringe-fueled GOP of modern times is the reason Obama got elected — love it or hate it. Bring back a moderate, small government Republican that knows how to separate state from religion and you’ve got yourself a president. And if we do get a Republican president back in office can you please tell him not to start new wars unless he can pay for them. And by paying for them, I don’t mean tax cuts.

  • http://coryinkorea.wordpress.com/ 코리아

    Let it go Jashin, leave those theories in the three years ago bin where they belong and make some new arguments, other wise you might as well get fitted for a new tin-foil hat. All arguments about re-election should really just be based on job performance to which I give a resounded “Meh”, although in hindsight “meh” was probably the best we should have expected under the circumstances despite all the hope and change hoopla and I personally decided that “meh” was good enough for me (especially considering Romney’s right-wing pandering can only manage a dismissive “Psshhh” from me). I can only speak from the outside perspective, having spent pretty much all of the past 3.5 years overseas, but things look a bit better so we’ll see what another four years will bring. My vote has already been cast.

  • http://coryinkorea.wordpress.com/ 코리아

    “Bring back a moderate, small government Republican that knows how to separate state from religion and you’ve got yourself a president.”

    Find that guy on either side of the aisle and I’ll vote for them tapa, but I honestly don’t think they’ve ever existed. At least not post WWII.

  • eujin

    We’ve never been treated to a single anecdote recounting Barack Obama’s personal generosity with anyone

    Read more, write less, or just make sure you’re reading the right kind of blogs. ;-)

    http://metropolitician.blogs.com/scribblings_of_the_metrop/2008/10/the-quality-of.html

  • yuna

    I would say it has to do with the increase in education, job prestige and social standing resulting from the shift in generation in these immigrant groups – dry cleaners and taxi drivers to lawyers and doctors.

  • josemareta

    Would the name Mitt Kim change anything?

  • slim

    “can we just make it official and hope the birthers go seal themselves in a garage somewhere and treat themselves to a lit’o’bit of the carbon monoxide?”

    Amen, but why stop at a lit’o’bit?

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    Do Americans really want a Mormon for a president…

    who believes in a man who “received golden plates from an angel” that only he could read… and translate using “seer stones” that were buried with the plates…. and never presented his ideas in a clear, logical order or engaged in formal debate.

    and “in the literal gathering of Israel and in the restoration of the Ten Tribes; that Zion (the New Jerusalem) will be built upon the American continent; that Christ will reign personally upon the earth; and, that the earth will be renewed and receive its paradisiacal glory.”

  • jk641

    I can’t wait to see Obama and Romney debate.

  • JK

    Let me give my own perspective as a Korean-American Obama supporter:

    To be honest, I get uncomfortable with the race factor in this race (just like in 2008). I get that African-Americans LOVE Obama and his wife and treat him like he’s the Second Coming, though I think this reaction is too much. I do not like the fact that many African-Americans cry racism whenever someone says anything critical of Obama (though racism MAY INDEED be a factor with some of those critics).

    I get why many Hispanic-American voters support Obama. They see him as a fellow minority (for now, since the Hispanic population is growing) and because of his softer views on immigration relative to Romney. But again, I get uneasy that this is potentially race-based, though with Hispanics it is nowhere what it is for African-Americans for Obama.

    On the flip side, I also get uneasy with SOME white American criticism of Obama. I hate the paranoia I see in certain blogs where Obama is viewed as an agent of Soviet Communism or radical Islam. And despite evidence to the contrary, I wonder why people still believe that Obama believes in a welfare system of entitlement without a requirement to try to work and how Obama is supposedly changing the welfare laws of Bill Clinton. Even Bill Clinton himself said the critics’ charges were false. And underneath this all, I cannot help but see a strain of racism from MANY (not all) of Obama’s biggest critics.

    On the other hand, I know that many Caucasians have a serious and legitimate gripe about Obama’s policies, and unfortunately, their voice is getting lost among other Obama critics who are convinceed that he is the Anti-Christ or an Arab agent of radical Islam or the bringer of a Socialist state to the US for the first time in the country’s history.

    As a Korean-American, I am aware of the ethnic identity politics in America since the passing of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill which influenced African-Americans, to this day, to vote Democrat and many conservative Southern whites to vote Republican. And as a growing bloc, I can see why Hispanic-Americans may vote for one candidate or the other.

    But I think, in general, that it’s harder to categorize many Asian-American groups like Korean-Americans. With an African-American running against a Caucasian American, it’s not a matter of ethnic politics (though admittedly, I have met some older Korean immigrants who have a poor racist opinion of Obama simply for his ethnicity). We the children of Korean immigrants tend to be pretty well-educated, but the political leanings still are not easily labeled just yet.

    I have Korean-American friends here in northern VA who are die-hard Republicans, who believe a Republican HAS to win the White House for the stock and housing markets to boom. They still tend to think fondly of George W. Bush and his legacy. I know more Korean-Americans who are die-hard Democrats, who are concerned about issues like education (for the sake of their kids), the budget crisis, and global warming.

    As for me, I don’t believe in ethnic identity when it comes to politics. I hate it that so many African-Americans ardently support Obama because he is black, and I hate it that so many (obviously not all) conservative Caucasians are dead-set against him because he is black. But between the two candidates, he clearly, at least for me, seems to be the better choice.

    But just as Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan would not recognize the Republican party of today, though both men are still viewed as respectable forefathers of the party, my negative opinion for the current Republican party that is still recovering from the legacy of George W. Bush is open to change…if the party itself were to change. But until then, and with the two candidates being who they are, it’s Obama for me. And that’s coming from a Korean-American.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    KAs (and many Asian Americans, in general) are increasingly leaning towards the DNP because the GOP’s schizophrenic immigration policy makes absolutely no sense. “Keep ‘em all out” is not an immigration policy.

  • sumo294

    JK–You’re not Korean American.

    Hoju_saram–You’re definitely an Aussie. Oh, yes, Australia, where they shit all over Asians (don’t-you-dare-say-we’re-Pacific-Rim-since-we’re-white-and-come-to-think-of-it-we-really-are-part-of-Europe-since-like-Elizabeth-is-still-our-Queen) even while bragging about how cool and progressive their country is (love Asian money however, from selling stuff from the ground to the Chinese to funny accents from third-rate schools). Why don’t you get rid of all the institutional racism that exists in your country? Until then, shut the fuck up, you piece of shit.