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Congrats, Kim Ki-duk

So, Kim Ki-duk’s “Pieta” apparently won the Golden Lion in Venice.

Say what you will about Kim—and people say a lot—but the guy does got talent.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • Maximus2008

    Why you say “apparently”? He won it.

    Q, hey, Q!!! Look at that, good news for a Korean director! And if this movie is something like Oldboy (full of revenge and stuff, Korean culture and etc.), this must be a great flick! I want to see it.

    Now, are you going to publish links saying that Japan and US and UK and etc. didn’t like the movie /never produced something like this / are saying that the jury was bought / etc.? We don’t need that, right? And if someone comes here saying that the movie is bad or whatever, be mature and discuss the MOVIE, not the colonialism or anything racist, please.

  • Q

    I’m not much interested in Kim Kiduk, max.

  • DJTwoTone

    Kim Ki-duk has never been a very popular director at home. Most of his movies are barely recognized in the media. His fan base is much bigger outside of the peninsula, even though he continually wins international film awards. And we all know how much the peninsula likes international awards… It’s a shame if you ask me. The man’s genius has never been properly recognized in Korea.

  • TheKorean2

    Kim kiduk is mediocre in Korea.

  • DJTwoTone

    @TheKorean2 – You mean you think he is mediocre compared to other Korean directors? Seriously?

  • EnricoPallazo
  • padaajoshi

    Well, he’s got a lot of heartbreak and suicide in his most recent film, so it is close to Korean ideals.

  • padaajoshi

    DJTwoTone: Koreans don’t like producers such as Kim Ki duk because most Koreans just wanna see the Hollywood shit.

    To me good taste is not spam and soju and thin cigarettes, but spam and soju and thin cigarettes are extremely popular here.

    What the hell do I know?

  • Ladron

    I’ve seen a lot of Korean movies, and I’ve seen all of Kim Ki Duk’s movies, and all his movies share two similarities:

    There’s always a woman of questionable morals: maybe she’s a prostitute, or an unmarried mother, or just kind of a slutty girl.

    There’s always someone who doesn’t talk, or, in the case of 나쁜 남자, only speaks once.

    I am far from a film expert, and I know that KKD studied in France, but I’ve always wondered why his movies all have the same style characters.

  • Arghaeri

    Koreans don’t like producers such as Kim Ki duk because most Koreans just wanna see the Hollywood shit.

    Let me correct that for you,

    Viwers generally don’t like directors such as Ki Duk because most viewers don’t like to watch boring as watching paint dry shit.

  • hamel

    I think the key to understanding why many Korean cinemagoers don’t like Kim Ki-duk’s films can be summarized by our friend Q at number 2. KKD shows the putrid underbelly of Korea – the dark side, the side we don’t see. And cheerleaders for Korea (a la Q. bless him) don’t WANT to see that side, and furthermore don’t want OTHERS to see that side, either. Kim lays the skeletons of Korea’s closet bare for all to see and discuss, but the family isn’t ready for that yet. Not in front of the neighbors.

    Clarification: I don’t mean to say that Korea has any more skeletons in its closet, or dark side, than any other modern post-industrial society. It is perhaps less willing to bring them into the light, though. Also, I find KKD’s films powerful and beautiful, but I fear that if I were to watch all of them end to end while locked in a dark room by myself, I might feel so despondent that I might be driven to top myself.

  • hamel

    Enrico Pallazo:

    thanks for that interesting article. I wasn’t aware of that angle, but I am looking forward to seeing the biopic of Lafayette Ronald Hubbard.

    On a related note, I heard from my wife (who was watching the TV news) that actress Choi Min-soo was voted to win the best actress award, but could not because the film had already won the Golden Lion. Has she confused the story, or was this also true?

  • Bendrix

    #9

    I don’t know about KKD in particular (I’ve only seen one of his movies) but I think in general many artists – writers, directors, musicians, whatever – develop certain obsessions and you’ll find recurrent themes in their work. That’s one of way of carving out a niche as an artist. Oh, he/she is that person who’s always doing this or that. You probably already knew this, but that’s just my explanation.

  • YangachiBastardo

    Nappeun Namja was a cool movie, everything else he did was really boring.

    I suspect this one is another stinker…by the way one the same loan sharking way of life subject this one is instead true masterpiece

  • http://globalasianculture.com Liz

    @11

    I think the key to understanding why many Korean cinemagoers don’t like Kim Ki-duk’s films can be summarized by our friend Q at number 2. KKD shows the putrid underbelly of Korea – the dark side, the side we don’t see.

    Not sure it’s a putrid underbelly that’s exclusively Korean. Most of that crap (incest, violence, the Oedipus Complex) is pretty universal, which is probably why the Eurotrash highbrows are eating out of his hand.

    That said, Kim Ki-duk is the Uncle Tom of Korean cinema. No wonder the cinematic community in Korea pretty much hates the bastard.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    I think the key to understanding why many Korean cinemagoers don’t like Kim Ki-duk’s films can be summarized by our friend Q at number 2. KKD shows the putrid underbelly of Korea – the dark side, the side we don’t see. And cheerleaders for Korea (a la Q. bless him) don’t WANT to see that side, and furthermore don’t want OTHERS to see that side, either. Kim lays the skeletons of Korea’s closet bare for all to see and discuss, but the family isn’t ready for that yet. Not in front of the neighbors.

    Perhaps. Frankly, though, I think it’s more that Korean moviegoers have more mainstream tastes. Lots of directors do films critical of aspects of Korean society with much greater commercial success. I actually like a lot of Kim’s earlier stuff, but you have to admit, regardless of subject matter, they’re an acquired taste.

  • YangachiBastardo

    That said, Kim Ki-duk is the Uncle Tom of Korean cinema. No wonder the cinematic community in Korea pretty much hates the bastard

    LOL that was fuckin’ priceless

    Ps

    And what’s up with the pony tail and the Che Guevara pin ? Good Lordibus grandpa

  • YangachiBastardo

    Lots of directors do films critical of aspects of Korean society with much greater commercial success

    Bring on the high school wars !

  • hamel

    Liz:

    Not sure it’s a putrid underbelly that’s exclusively Korean. Most of that crap (incest, violence, the Oedipus Complex) is pretty universal, which is probably why the Eurotrash highbrows are eating out of his hand.

    I made this point in my clarification. Yes, of course putrid underbelly is universal, wherever humans live. Kim Ki Duk only attempts to show that portion of the putrid underbelly that exists in Korea, and this makes him undesirable.

    That said, Kim Ki-duk is the Uncle Tom of Korean cinema. No wonder the cinematic community in Korea pretty much hates the bastard.

    I am not sure if that is true. If it were, how would it be possible for KKD to consistently get good actors and actresses to work with him? (On a sidenote, have there been cases of actors who have come out post-shooting and talked smack about KKD, saying that he is awful to work with?)

    Now to Robert:

    I think the key to understanding why many Korean cinemagoers don’t like Kim Ki-duk’s films can be summarized by our friend Q at number 2. KKD shows the putrid underbelly of Korea – the dark side, the side we don’t see. And cheerleaders for Korea (a la Q. bless him) don’t WANT to see that side, and furthermore don’t want OTHERS to see that side, either. Kim lays the skeletons of Korea’s closet bare for all to see and discuss, but the family isn’t ready for that yet. Not in front of the neighbors.

    Perhaps.

    hey, Bobcat, if you don’t agree with me, just say so. It’s cool.

    Frankly, though, I think it’s more that Korean moviegoers have more mainstream tastes. Lots of directors do films critical of aspects of Korean society with much greater commercial success. I actually like a lot of Kim’s earlier stuff, but you have to admit, regardless of subject matter, they’re an acquired taste.

    Yes most Korean cinephiles have more mainstream tastes. But I get the feeling most Koreans would rather that Kim Ki Duk didn’t exist at all. (See Q above.) I mean, in terms of a Korean artiste doing well overseas, KKD surely has more credentials than most, but he rarely rates in any Korean presentation on Hallyu. And that is sad.

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    But I get the feeling most Koreans would rather that Kim Ki Duk didn’t exist at all. (See Q above.)

    Using Q as a guidance for what “most Koreans” think is always a bad idea.

  • hamel

    thekorean: Ok I just used Q as an expedient example because he was there. mea culpa

    I get this impression from having lived in Korea for 12 years, watching KKD movies and trying to discuss them with Korean folks, and so on.

  • Q

    I do not watch that many movies, so that I could not dare to say that I represent most Korean population. My favorite Korean movies I could remember at this moment are ‘The Classic’, ‘Running Boy’(말아톤), and 200 Pounds Beauty(미녀는 괴로워).

    As for Kim Kiduk, I watched only one: 빈집. I thought psychoanalysts would more appreciate his work.

  • Seth Gecko

    200 Pounds Beauty is one of your favorite Korean movies? Oh man.

  • Maximus2008

    “200 Pounds Beauty is one of your favorite Korean movies? Oh man.”

    And now we know with whom we are dealing with:

    1) really, a teen scared of his upcoming military service or

    2) a very good con-man!

  • Q

    Yeah, I would rather watch A Night at Roxbury than KKD. BTW, RIP Mr. Michael Clarke Duncan.

  • virtual wonderer

    i hope kim ki duk fulfills on his threat to leave korea to those places with “finer cinematic tastes.”

    all his movies are grim. all his female characters are victims of rape who is just waiting to be turned insane. if korea ever liberalized the pr0n0 industry, kim ki duk would pose serious threat to the JAV moguls.

    talented yes. but he is like a reverse spielberg who cant help himself from imbuing that certain quality that is ebullient within him. in the case of spielberg, melodrama, in the case of kim kiduk, some deep seated sexual angst. and frankly, noone in korea cares. and outside korea, only the cult movie devotees and art house film lovers.

    They say the japanese press used to despise Akira Kurosawa and couldnt understand why the West loved him, assuming Westerners loved some strange orientalism.

    50 years from now, noone will call kim ki duk, Korea’s kurosawa. he will be lucky if his films are remembered like, “realm of the senses.”