≡ Menu

The War on Crime

After a series of brutal crimes, the conservative press seems to have gone “all-in” in making law-and-order a social issue.

Ye OIde Chosun talked with LA Deputy District Attorney Anne Park, who’s apparently a veteran in dealing with child sex abuse cases (I suppose you’d have to be when Cardinal Roger Mahony is your archbishop for 16 years).

Check out the lede—-welcome to Planet Chosun:

Opinion is growing that violent crimes like sexual assaults on children and impulse killings are occurring frequently because Korea’s society’s crime deterrence has weakened. Lenient verdicts on brutal crimes, a nominal death sentence system that hasn’t been used in 15 years, slack public order turning our streets at night into havens for crime, a drinking culture mass producing drunken violence, illegal online porn ceaselessly provoking savage impulses… the public is criticizing that this reality is turning Korea into a society of fear by weakening crime deterrence.

Holy shit! Thank God I brought my Kevlar vest to work today—no telling what woe awaits in the dark, dangerous alleys of Bukchon.

Anyway, Park noted that in Migukistan, perpetrators of particularly vicious sexual assaults can get what amounts to a life sentence, and no, sentences aren’t reduced if the criminal is drunk. Oh, and physical castration isn’t really an option in the modern world, and probably wouldn’t end sexual urges anyway. She also called for a thorough crackdown on porn. According to her, porn was found on the computers of most of the criminals that are caught (Porn? On a computer?)—the perps sit in their room and watch porn alone, and then relieve their sexual urges on powerless women.

Note: Before anyone starts in about the habit of Korean judges to reduce sentences if the perp was drunk, I’ll note that Korea isn’t the only society where large numbers of people find odd reasons for wanting to go easy on sexual assault (even if juries don’t agree).

Meanwhile, the JoongAng Ilbo reports that police are intensifying their crackdown on street crime:

Declaring a war on sex crimes, the police yesterday announced a one-month plan to intensify patrols and crack down on child pornography to reduce sex offenses against children and women.

Following a meeting of senior police officials, Police Commissioner General Kim Ki-yong held a press conference and announced a beefed-up public security plan to fight the recent surge of sex crimes and run-amok attacks. Public outrage reached a new peak after a 7-year-old girl in Naju, South Jeolla, was abducted from her home in the dead of night and raped by a neighbor last week. That followed a series of recent brutal crimes around the country.

“We became keenly aware that the police had failed to meet the public’s expectation to prevent the crimes,” said Kim. “We will use all authority and power given to us to prevent such heinous crimes.”

Might I suggest Commissioner Kim refer to LAPD’s excellent handling of street crime—-that’s one woman who won’t be talking on her cell phone while driving again.

The Dong-A Ilbo, meanwhile, looks at Korea’s death row. There are currently 60 inmates who have received death sentences. All together, they killed 207 people—that’s 3.5 victims per perp, and three of them killed 10 or more. And there are some truly, truly monstrous people in there. Despite the death penalty having been judged constitutional—twice—it hasn’t been used since 1997. The Dong-A notes the government spends 1.32 million won a year to keep these folk alive. That’s about 22 million won per inmate.

Wonder if anyone listens to John & Ken down at the Dong-A…

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • holterbarbour

    I always thought that if you weren’t releasing your sexual urges to porn on the computer, it was because you hadn’t found the really good porn yet.

  • R. Elgin

    Putting cops on the street is pure politics and nothing more.

    I believe the lack of good parenting leads to more evil than anything else. Go ask Korean women in their 50-40s if their parents hugged them or if they hug their children. Chances are, a good many will say “no” and that is not a healthy thing, IMHO.

    Showing more concern and the expression of that by hugging could save many people – as simplistic as that may seem – but I suspect that kids, who are hugged often, don’t feel like killing people later on in life.

  • http://www.chinasmack.com/tag/funny/page/3 Jakgani

    There are currently 60 inmates who have received death sentences………. The Dong-A notes the government spends 1.32 million won a year to keep these folk alive. That’s about 22 million won per inmate.

    1,320,000 / 60 inmates = 22,000 won per year per inmate (just 1,8333 won per month) ??

    You sure it isn’t 1.32 billion ?

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    I believe the lack of good parenting leads to more evil than anything else. Go ask Korean women in their 50-40s if their parents hugged them or if they hug their children. Chances are, a good many will say “no” and that is not a healthy thing, IMHO.

    Oh come on – Korean kids are miles ahead of Western kids in terms of behaviour. Korean parents hug their kids, perhaps not as often as in the west, but it’s more a shyness thing than anything, and there’s no less love in a Korean family than a Western one. My wife doesn’t hug her folks very often, but her and her sisters look after them a hell of a lot better than whitey does (myself included, sad to say). And now I have a kid (since 5 days ago) it’s pretty obvious that the little bub isn’t going to lack for attention and warmth from mum over the years.

    Way back in the day I used to teach some kids who had two dentist parents. They were really rich, had a nanny etc, but they lived in a simple little apartment and the two kids, about 10 and 13, used to share their parent’s bed, which is quite common. Korean kids get plenty of love; nor is there an issue with crime – let alone murder – in the ROK.

  • Ladron

    Putting more cops on the street is going to cost a lot of money – they’ll have to buy a lot more cars for the police to sleep in.

  • jk6411

    hoju @#4,

    Congratulations on the birth of your new child.
    I wish your baby and your family health and happiness.

  • R. Elgin

    Congratulations on having a baby “Hoju” but I would wager that little The Little One will be hugged more than her mom did and that’s good.

    I have heard from more than a few kids anecdotal stories about how their mom did not hug them enough and the same stories from older Koreans. You may be correct but more hugging wouldn’t hurt anyone – unless they are a teenager and then it would hurt like hell. ^_^

  • Cloud

    Congratulations on the baby, Hoju!

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    “Holy shit! Thank God I brought my Kevlar vest to work today…”

    It’s interesting that Kevlar can stop a bullet, but can’t stop a knife.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Congrats HS!

  • babotaengi

    Being from a somewhat reserved family, all the public affection parents and grandparents exhibit with their offspring often makes me uncomfortable. Don’t remember being subjected to the like back home. Obviously I believe it a good thing, and the issue mine, but my anecdotal experience doesn’t jive with yours, Elgin.

    And for the record: I remember when I was about seven, my dad made a passing comment about children naturally loving their mothers more than their fathers. Upon hearing this, I felt terribly sorry for him, so I made a point of kissing him every morning before I went to school. This attempt at a display of affection met with total fail. I’m sure he appreciated it, but, i’m sure even moreso than myself, he’d spent his whole life without anything like i from his own parentst, so the act made him visibly uncomfortable. He let me kiss him, but he couldn’t bring himself to respond in any way. As a result, I soon gave up on the whole project, as it was making me feel awkward too. Even today, with him approaching dotage, I make a point of hugging him in the rare instances when I see him, but it still feels uncomfortable/forced as hell. Same deal with telling my parents I love them. To me, it’s understood and expressing it is redundant.

    Despite all this, the thought of raping and/or murdering anyone, let alone children, is utterly repellent to me. I can’t comprehend, outside the motives of greed or revenge, why anyone would do such a thing. Certainly to do such things to children is unfathomable.

    So, Mr. Elgin, all see your specious anecdotal evidence and raise you some Personal experience. You’re move.

  • CactusMcHarris

    #4 It’s obvious someone needs to change their name to Hoju (Big) Daddy – congrats there!

    And from what I’ve read here, the Korean cops seem to be woefully unprepared / ill-prepared for the modern-day psychopaths.

  • babotaengi

    That being said, I do believe that Koreans often are shitty parents who do nothing but indulge their children except when they are annoying them themselves. Even the teachers apparently couldn’t be assed trying to instill manners or a sense of social responsibility in the little hellions.

  • jk6411

    That being said, I do believe that Koreans often are shitty parents who do nothing but indulge their children

    Yes, it’s true.
    Korean parents should discipline their kids more.

    They’re afraid that if they discipline their kids too much, this will “subdue” the kids’ spirits or cause them mental problems later in life.
    But IMO not disciplining them enough is much worse than disciplining them too much.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    babotaengi,

    True between the ages of 1-5. Less true after that tender age.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    “police yesterday announced a one-month”

    And herein lies the problem. They’ll make an example of a few and then pat themsleves on the back. If they police this much the way they police prostitution it shows they’re not terribly serious about change.

  • babotaengi

    “babotaengi,

    True between the ages of 1-5. Less true after that tender age.”

    Not sure about that. Just the thought of hOlding my mother’s/father’s hand while walking down the street at the age of twelve would have mortified me. See it all the time here.

  • Q

    Korean cops do not use bullet guns that might be less intimidating to criminals. Die Hard Korean police officer was recently reported on CNN :

    http://youtu.be/e8gpNrWn5aY

    Anyway, Hoju, congratulations!

  • Yu Bum Suk

    “Not sure about that. Just the thought of hOlding my mother’s/father’s hand while walking down the street at the age of twelve would have mortified me. See it all the time here.”

    Koreans are no doubt more physical with each other than westerners (I just saw a 17-18-year-old girl holding a teacher’s hand) but I’m not sure how that really translates to genuine affection and good will. Probably about as much as a preference for cabbage over lettuce.

  • padaajoshi

    Korea is relatively violent crime free. However, South Korea–before the Norway debacle of last summer–held first place internationally for mass murder with a gun when a cop went bonkers in April of 1982 and killed 58 people including himself in a murder/suicide that lasted 8 hours and covered a lot of rural ground in Gyeongsangbuk.

    Not surprisingly, most Koreans, even several history teachers to whom I’ve talked, deny ever hearing of this event.

    Still, chances of getting taken out by a nutcase with an uzi or AK 47 here are very, very low.

  • Pingback: Korean Gender Reader | The Grand Narrative