≡ Menu

Sit down for this: Netizens misbehaving on social media

I know, I was shocked, too:

Amidst worldwide claims that Australian referee, Barbara Csar, failed to point out some faults in Heidemann’s play, such as maintaining the correct distance and starting before the clock began ticking, Korean netizens searched online to find out more about the referee and Shin’s opponent.

Csar and Heidemann were easily located on Facebook, and soon their walls were full of messages rebuking them for what happened. When their accounts were blocked from public view, netizens started to write on the wall of Heidemann’s boyfriend, and revealed contact information online.

Many, however, are concerned that this will cause emotional strife between Korea and Germany, including German media such as Der Spiegel, a weekly magazine that wrote an article titled “Referee Csar Insulted on the Internet.”

Not sure what this means, either:

The high rate of Korean athletes involved in judging controversies has the country up in arms, in particular, whether the referees are biased against Team Korea. Sports watchers are saying that despite improved performances by South Korean athletes, the prowess of the country’s sports diplomacy has yet to develop.

The country currently has two members on the International Olympic Committee — Samsung Chairman Lee Kun-hee and Moon Dae-sung, former Olympic taekwondo gold medalist.

Jesus H. Christ, a half-country of 50,000 million currently sits No. 3 in the gold medal count. How much more above Korea’s weight do they want the country to punch?

On a slightly positive note, Mongolian judoka Naidan Tuvshinbayar took silver in the 100 kg weight category, losing in the finals to a Russian as President Putin looked on. He was the reigning gold medalist (not to mention a Hero of Labor!), so I suppose this is something of a disappointment. All things considered (and by all things, we mean Uncle Vlad sitting in the stands), though, it wasn’t such a bad result.

Oh, and just out of curiosity, is there an archery team out there not coached by a Korean?

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    I actually admire the fact that Koreans are not satisfied with their “punching power.” It certainly beats what some of the Brits have said about just being happy to finish 7th and get an Olympic experience. Seems like there is a rather disturbing trend in the West where people are actually happy with being mediocre (“Just happy to be here”, “Im proud just to be nominated”, “Win or lose, its the effort that counts”). That probably started when we began rewarding people for effort or when we started shielding kids from disappointment of losing by declaring everyone a winner. That said, the netizens are acting like idiots, again, and they are fooling themselves if they think that Korea’s prowess in sports diplomacy will improve if they continue acting like children.

  • bumfromkorea

    Jesus H. Christ, a half-country of 50,000 million currently sits No. 3 in the gold medal count. How much more above Korea’s weight do they want the country to punch?

    When I read “prowess of sports diplomacy”, I was excited that they were talking about the on-site coaches’ ability to handle appeal and complaint processes (though the coaches for Shin A Lam handled it relatively well, I think). What a difference the next sentence makes…

    Oh, and just out of curiosity, is there an archery team out there not coached by a Korean?

    Not just the coaches, apparently.

  • jkitchstk

    #1,
    “Seems like there is a rather disturbing trend in the West where people are actually happy with being mediocre (“Just happy to be here”, “Im proud just to be nominated”, “Win or lose, its the effort that counts”). That probably started when we began rewarding people for effort or when we started shielding kids from disappointment of losing by declaring everyone a winner.”

    Did you ever win a gold medal? Did you ever qualify for an Olympic event? Did you ever qualify to qualify?

  • Anathema

    Australian referee? This isn’t the first time Koreans have gotten poor old Österreich mixed up with Oz. Lordy, what would dogbert say?

  • Keith

    The Koreans are doing very well, they should be happy with the results so far. Refereeing mistakes happen and behaving like elementary school children when everything doesn’t go your way doesn’t do you any favours in promoting your brand. There are always controversies at the Olympics.

    Aaron Cook being left out of team GB was crazy, why would they not include the Briton who is the number one (in his class) ranked Taekwondo fighter in the world! That was a decision that really had me scratching my head.

    I see team GB catching up a bit as a lot of the sports so far, apart from the cycling, are things that Britons generally don’t do to well in. I just checked the rowing and they did well. Team GB up just behind Team Korea! One more gold and GB go ahead. I think GB will do well in upcoming games, I predict that Jessica Ennis may well get the next British gold tomorrow and I’m also looking forward to seeing how the footie with GB versus Korea goes, even though it is on a ridiculous time.

    Team US and Team China are doing well, which is not a suprise at all.

  • slim

    Korea needs to be disabused of the idea that their troubles stem from a deficit in “sports diplomacy prowess”.

    1. Korea has hosted or will host both summer and winter games and the World Cup, as well as countless other World Cup sporting events.

    2. The ROK has long had delegates on the powerful IOC. (Some have unfortunately been massively corrupt.)

    One constant between the 1988 Seoul Games (which I covered as a 20-something reporter) and London 2012, beside the very respectable showing of Team Korea in medals tables, is the sheer shittiness of Korean journalism. As free as ROK media outlets are, they often perform no better than the execrable Chinese state media.

  • Keith

    To be fair slim. The IOC are possibly only slightly less corrupt than FIFA.

    When there is too much money involved, you get corruption. I’d like in some ways for the Olympics to go back to ‘amateurs only’ as it used to be. Less records would be broken, but it would make the sports more honest.

  • Dokdoforever

    A much better way to judge the athletic prowess of a nation, in my opinion, is in terms of per capita medals. How many people does it take for each nation to produce someone who is the best in the world at some olympic athletic competition? According to this measurement, the people of New Zealand are the world’s greatest athletes. Here are the rankings in terms of millions of people it takes each country to earn a gold medal:

    New Zealand 1.466666667
    Slovenia 2.05
    Lithuania 3.18
    Croatia 4.29
    Hungary 4.5
    Kazakhstan 5.566666667
    North Korea 6.125
    South Korea 6.928571429
    Netherlands 8.35
    Belarus 9.4
    UK 10.33333333
    France 10.88333333
    Italy 12.625
    Germany 16.36
    South Africa 16.83333333
    USA 17.44444444
    Romania 19
    Australia 22.7
    Ukraine 22.8
    Venezuela 27
    Russia 47.66666667
    Japan 63.5
    China 72.22222222
    Brazil 192

  • DLBarch

    Dokdo@8,

    Exactly right, exactly right.

    Moreover, if one wants to go super-nationalist and include data based on ethnicity, then Korea shouldn’t forget NoKo’s five medals to date, including four golds.

    DLB

  • CactusMcHarris

    DLB,

    You don’t have any of those pirated Yoko in Noko vinyls, do you? I guess if you did, you couldn’t say so.

    And Dokdo’s summation points out the pluses of having a ‘national’ sports policy for kids from birth. I’ve read elsewhere that the Kiwis are the fittest nation on earth, and those stats bear it out.

  • DLBarch

    CMcH,

    As a former collegiate rower and now a forty-something weekend sculler, I am always amazed that countries like the Netherlands and New Zealand produce any Olympic champions at all. One would think that the law of large numbers would all but shut out these countries and their ridiculously small populations from any serious global competitions.

    As for national sports policies, I’m all for them. Hell, even for non-future Olympians, the decline of even basic P.E. classes and afternoon sports programs is a disgrace, as is the rise of the “fat-fuck, can’t-do-five-push-ups-to-save-my-life” generation.

    But I hear they’re good at John Madden NFL `12, so that’s something, I guess.

    DLB

  • Dogbert

    @4: no doubt, my poor pal Joerg is spinning in his grave.

  • DLBarch

    And while we’re on the topic, don’t let it be said that academic achievement has to be sacrificed in the name of athletic success, or that the tradition of the scholar-athlete is a bygone hold-over from 19th century Cambridge-Oxford rivalries:

    http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/olympics-fourth-place-medal/u-women-eight-wins-second-straight-gold-not-121507923–oly.html

    Go Bears!

    DLB

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ Jeffery Hodges

    South Korea is “a half-country of 50,000 million,” a population figure that looks even more impressive in all numerals:

    50,000,000,000

    In American English, that’s fifty billion South Koreans, which is a lot of people, so I can understand why Koreans think they should be getting more medals.

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • pawikiroggi

    Her facebook page is not blocked from the public -

    http://www.facebook.com/barbara.csar?sk=wall%26%23160%3B

    Koreans just acting like poor losers again.

  • http://ulsanonline.com Martypants

    “South Korea is “a half-country of 50,000 million,” a population figure that looks even more impressive in all numerals:

    50,000,000,000″

    Apparently math wasn’t your strong suit – 9 zeros is billion.

  • Brendan

    Jeffery, correction there. It’s 50 million and not 50,000 million.

  • slim

    @11 – Here’s hoping DLB will lead the charge to pry these American youth off their fat asses so they can get fencing, rowing and sailing like average healthy youngsters of earlier times.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ Jeffery Hodges

    The Body Snatchers must have gotten Pawi — he’s not only criticizing Koreans, he’s capitalizing!

    (Seriously, did somebody rip off his pseudonym during the disqus anomie?)

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • Q

    Actually, I agree with pawi.

  • kaizenmx

    Netizens doing what they are good at the best.

  • LazyassBruiser

    @ # 12

    “pal” “Jeorg” Are you trying to tell us something ? :)

  • SalarymaninSeoul

    What’s a “half country”?

    #3, no, I have never won an olympic medal, though I fail to see the point. The attitude is applied to more than just sports.