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Open Thread #241

Looks like a great day to go bike riding.

  • Seth Gecko

    First, bro!
    Have an awesome day, everyone!!

  • Jieun K

    First!

    (Just playin’ along.)

  • Jieun K

    Adam Yauch of Beastie Boys passed away yesterday due to illness at the age of 47. He will be truly missed by the fans all over the world.

    So, Adam, what’s the time?

  • Seth Gecko

    “I got more rhymes than I got gray hairs, and that’s a lot ‘cos I got my share!”

  • sluggh

    Making my first-ever visit to Seoul on Tuesday. I’ll be on a race-green Brompton folder. See you along the river!

  • gbnhj

    MCA really will be missed. Here’s another great one.

  • Jieun K

    MCA, come and rock the Sure Shot.

  • eujin

    The BNP candidate for London mayor, Carlos Cortiglia, is an immigrant from the Americas who spent some time as a teacher and now works in media and publishing. He says that;

    “Every decent non-indigenous citizen knows that we have to work together to build a society that works. They understand that we need a common host culture, the traditional British culture, to be the primary culture. They recognise that multiculturalism is a divisive charade that is destroying social cohesion and tearing apart our nation, and all to make money for the big business backers of the three old parties.”

    and that;

    “Sexuality is a reality because we are all sexual beings. Sex establishments themselves do not create female exploitation. Female exploitation is the consequence of extremely complex social and economic realities. Banning establishments is a very theatrical way of doing nothing to counter female exploitation. Regarding other establishments, like gay pubs frequented by adults, I don’t see what purpose a ban will fulfil. As adults we are entitled to our own sexuality.”

    He speaks fluent English (with an accent) and insists that everyone who comes to live in the UK should learn English. He warns us against the dangers of illegal immigration, Islam, countries like Iran, the Marxist press and left-wing propaganda. Sound familiar? In an election that included a whiff-whaff clown, a self-employed newt farmer, a gay policeman and a former archaeologist who thinks you learn a lot about society by studying plants, Carlos came dead last and the British National Party lost all of the council seats it was defending.

  • Seth Gecko

    Jieun K,
    You’re slow today. I beat you to the “first”, AND the Sure Shot reference :)

  • keith

    I’m glad the BNP lost seats, they’re scum. Britain obviously isn’t completely broken yet, but it is certainly in need of some care. Boris’s re-election to mayor of London was very shaming though. The only responsibility I’d give that chap in London is cleaning the toilets in the tube stations, and even that might be a job beyond his meagre talents.

    Regarding the biking. It was perfect, absolutely perfect weather. My only issues with my wonderful ride were with other people’s irresponsibility. Too many people riding without lights after it got dark, dangerous weaving, and too many people not paying attention. Honestly how hard is it to cycle in a straight line? I can do that shit no handed.

    If I wasn’t paying attention this evening I could have run over a little child, I almost did. A male (dad) was on one side of the cycle path and a female (mum) was on the other. Dad to child ‘come here quickly”, mum ‘quickly’ and the little scrot ran in front of me. If I wasn’t paying attention and didn’t have quality brakes on the bike, I could have killed the child. Neither of the parents even looked before telling their kid to run across the bike path (they weren’t in a crossing area either). If they had even take a cursory look they would have seen me, I have lights unlike many of the other cyclists out on the Han paths tonight. They were lucky, I have good brakes and many people ride poorly maintained bikes down there.

    Many people like to say that Korea is 1st world now, but until parents start teaching their kids basic common sense it won’t be. Before the adults understand what basic common sense is as a ‘concept’ Korea will be derided. Being a 1st world country isn’t about money, it’s about culture. Korea is improving, the UK is getting worse.

  • http://geoju.kr fanwarrior

    So someone didn’t look both ways before crossing the road so now it isn’t a 1st world country? Wow..elitist much?
    I hate to break it to you champ, but common sense is gone in the west too. People are self-absorbed twats, just as they are here. People get run over all the time there because of their own stupidity. People jaywalk, people get hit by cars, I mean christ, it’s nearly a weekly thing that someone gets killed in Calgary because they thought they could outrun the train and it ends up screwing up everyone’s schedule as they need to scrape the tracks for a few hours afterwards.

  • keith

    FW. I’m not an ‘elitist’ by any stretch. I don’t have any kids. If I did have kids the first thing I’d teach them is how to be safe. That’s not ‘elitist’, and even the dumbest kids can learn that stuff. Teaching kids how to be safe is what a responsible adult does. If you can’t do that then you shouldn’t have any.

    Do you actually think those parents were being responsible?

    Do you think it is wise to tell a child to run into danger?

  • iMe

    so you saw a couple of parents being careless in an incredibly safe city of 10 (or is it 20?) million and decided korea is a backward country?

    wow…just WOW.

  • Seth Gecko

    I think that if a country wants to be considered “1st world”, there shouldn’t be a bin of shitty toilet paper beside the toilet.

  • keyinjpop

    Potheads, now is a good time to head to Oregon.
    http://health.yahoo.net/news/s/ap/got-the-munchies-a-new-pot-eatery-opens-in-ore
    This women makes Snooki look light.
    http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/tanning-mom-patricia-krentcil-lashes-critics-200400565.html
    Also, today is Cinco de Mayo so break out the sombreros and margaritas.

  • dogbertt

    I do wonder how Koreans managed to survive the past few millenia without KeeftheChav telling them they need to grow up and have common sense like (presumably first-world) adults — like him, in other words.

    The white man’s burden lies so heavy on those narrow shoulders.

  • jk6411

    I think there are too many immature people these days, everywhere in the world.
    The other day, I heard about a dad in California who sued his kid’s school after his kid was caught cheating in class. (Talk about irresponsibility..)

    Last year, Canadians in Vancouver rioted after their team lost in Stanley Cup finals. (Canadians, of all people.)

    I think maturity and chivalry are being replaced by irresponsibility, boorishness, temper tantrums, and dumb stunts on Youtube.
    (Call me paranoid, but I think the Internet has a lot to do with the spread of this new lowbrow culture worldwide..)

    Have a good weekend, everyone.

  • iMe

    i’d say keith should spend a month or two in some of the *finest* cities our first class world has to offer…like manchester, leeds, detroit and queens and so on. he can definitely go on a peaceful bike ride in these cities without worrying about running over little scoundrels. just has to be ready to dodge a bullet or two, but hey, at least it won’t be him doing the killing.

  • jk6411

    just has to be ready to dodge a bullet or two, but hey, at least it won’t be him doing the killing.

    *gasp*

    BTW, I miss riding bikes in Korea..

  • YangachiBastardo

    Being a 1st world country isn’t about money, it’s about culture

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA the battle anthem of every failed euro-country.

    Poor Koreans they have the best infrastructure in the world, some of the most succesful companies, some of the most educated people in the world, a per capita GDP above the EU average, none of the social illnesses of the West but NO they’re not first world cos they’re found wanting in some vaguely defined “culture” department

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    Six forty-five in the ante meridiem, and this Sunday looks set to be fine for bike riding as well . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • iMe

    great britain, where kings and queens and princes and princesses and all that monarchy bullshit still exist and are worshipped. in 20fucking12 no less.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    YB chortles over “some vaguely defined ‘culture’ department.”

    Until the South Korean government establishes a Ministry for the Cultivation of Proper Bike Riding and Serious Walks, how can anyone insist that Korea has a first-world culture?

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • Anathema

    Poor Keith, living in a land where he hates the food and culture, and spends countless hours on the Internet trying to convince everyone how good English food really is, we just don’t know that it’s good because we only ate the bad stuff while we were in England.

  • Soulz

    Hallyu is not a wave, it’s a tsunami… the Korean Wave porn @ http://goo.gl/VKp4T

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Thanks for reminding me Anathema.

    I had forgotten that living in a “first-world country” was waking up on a weekend morning and eating fried egg, fried bacon, corned beef hash
    sausages, black pudding, fried hash browns, sautéed potatoes,
    potato waffles, fried bread, English muffins, pancakes, baked beans, fried mushrooms, tinned tomatoes and bubble and squeak.

    then getting onto the bike with lights and super brakes and hurtling down along the river, impressing people with the “super brakes” whenever a thirld world child runs across the cycle speed lanes and then ending up at her majesties bar to gulp down some guiness with the other cycling lads whilst singing praises to the royal pansies.

    actually, I prefer eating yoghurt for breakfast and walking – it’s more natural. really – I hate bicycles!

  • Granfalloon

    I’ll stand up for Keith. While I disagree with any implications about “cultured or uncultured,” I can understand his frustration. Car/pedestrian/bicycle traffic here is FUCKED UP. Just a few days ago, some asshole plowed into a group of cyclists, because he was WATCHING TV WHILE DRIVING.
    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/three-cyclists-killed-in-korea-crash

    So yeah, keep laughing at Keith. Is Korea violent? No. Does Korea have a massive and obvious problem with preventable traffic death? Fuck yes.

  • babotaengi

    “Until the South Korean government establishes a Ministry for the Cultivation of Proper Bike Riding and Serious Walks, how can anyone insist that Korea has a first-world culture?”

    Haha. That’s Monty Python worthy, that one.

    I’m in Songdo at the moment. Apparently they expected all the “1st world” people in this country to come here. Thus pretty much every sidewalk has a designated bicycle section (in some Places its on the road). There are also painted arrows to indicate which direction you should be riding in. Of course there are still mobs of kids riding all over the place with total disregard for rules or safety. It’s an utter disgrace. Someone should tell these children to grow up!

    And then there are all the cigarette butts on the ground. They are everywhere. Sure, there aren’t any trash bins or ashtrays to put your cigarette butts in (not even in the apartment complexes), but why don’t the residents of Songdo get the hint and realize they are to quit all this smoking business if they want to be first world?

    In a restaurant in a somewhat less “civilized” part of Incheon, I was carrying three cups of hot, black coffee to my party’s table. Suddenly I heard and then saw out the corner of my eye three or four kids screaming with excitement as they chased each other with excitement. I froze like a gazelle when it first hears the approach of a pack of hyenas; the headlines flashed before my eyes: “Wicked Native English Teacher Scalds Babies with Boiling Water – Doesn’t Say Sorry”. Fortunately for me, one of the mothers or aunts or whatever must have seen me and the same news story; she screamed at those kids like she’d found them murdering a sibling. I nearly spilled my coffee on account of it. But I was grateful.

  • YangachiBastardo

    an example of marvelous first world culture:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1344691/Nicholas-Pearton-stabbed-death-teenage-gang.html

    Notice the cutting edge architecture and the glitzy shops…nuke Europe

    (it will vastly improve)

  • paulhewson

    “Got more rhymes than Jamaica got Mango Kangols
    I got the peg leg at the end of my stump
    Shake your rump”

    MCA, RIP.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Cyclists are among the most selfish of all road-users – even worse than bus drivers.

    They think they own the road, and feel hard done by with little reason.

    I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve watched cyclists ignore red traffic lights, and just dash across the junction.

    Time and time again, I’ve watched them mount the pavement, whip across a pedestrian crossing, then bounce back onto the road at other busy junctions, scattering people in their wake – are they practicing to become domino pizzas delivery persons?

  • YangachiBastardo

    Not many people know they started out as a hard core punk band and were among the founders of the great 1980′s NYHC scene…

    RIP

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    keith, you say what to all of the above? you usually very mouthy. please respond.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Pawi – you usually very mouthy…

  • Q

    The M. Hole couldn’t be shut.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    I object! I’m surely the mouthiest one in this den of marmots! I demand a recount! They do vote on this, don’t they?

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • αβγδε

    The Beastie Boys weren’t a consistent bunch. When they were doing hip hop and following the popular trends in rap music, they came off as effete whiteboy clowns who were too goofy to be hard or gangsta. But at their best they were artists who thrived in urban and suburban collage, mixes of funk, hip hop, ghetto, uptown, jazz, rock middlebrow music. And I digged them for that. In other words, they were at their best as Jewish, white kid urbanites playing funk with their musical instruments, rapping lyrics, cutting vinyl, and playing punk riffs all in the same jam.

    MC A was the best rapper of Beastie Boys. And I always thought of him whenever the subject of Tibet and Buddhism came up.

    Resolution Time

  • CactusMcHarris

    My first rap song that I remember (there could be others that I don’t)

    So you think you’re bad, with your rap
    Well I’ll tell ya pilgrim I started the crap
    When you were in diapers and wetting the sheets
    I was at the Ponderosa rapping to the beat

    source: http://www.lyricsondemand.com/r/rappindukelyrics/rappindukelyrics.html

    Saw another ‘Korean and Sushi’ restaurant, this time in Idaho. I got to stop there sometimes and see if we can’t get a game of yut and some makkoli action happening.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    sushi is Japanese isn’t it?

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Unless you’re talking about Kimbap and the fact that Americans call it sushi….

  • CactusMcHarris

    #39,

    You had better nip that sort of thinking in the buddokan, young man – everyone knows sushi originates in Burkina-Faso.

    If you are ever in San Diego, you’ll see a lot of ‘Mexican and Seafood’ signs. I’m convinced this is just more clever conjunctions of the marketing world.

  • CactusMcHarris

    #40,

    No, I’m aware of the difference – I’ve lived in both countries.

  • Seth Gecko

    CactusMcHarris,

    “Rappin’ Duke”, Jesus that brings me back. One of the first rap songs I heard, too.
    Here’s a fan-made video for that 1984 classic:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85G5SI5Nu3s&feature=related

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon
  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    International workers day or “May day” or “Labor day” has been celebrated even throughout Joseon in Japanese-occupied Korea since 1923.

    Why isn’t it a public holiday these days?

    It’s a public holiday in North Korea – celebrated as International Worker Day.

  • Seth Gecko

    Re: “Free school lunch! It’s free – lets throw it on the ground –”

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gAYL5H46QnQ

  • Anonymous_Joe

    #27 Granfalloon: “I’ll stand up for Keith. While I disagree with any implications about “cultured or uncultured,” I can understand his frustration. ….So yeah, keep laughing at Keith. Is Korea violent? No. Does Korea have a massive and obvious problem with preventable traffic death? Fuck yes.”

    I’ll stick up for Keith, too. Korea and Koreans put the passage of cars before the protection of pedestrians. I see it EVERY (yes, I mean that literally) day. I walk with me children in a stroller, and some douche bag makes a highly aggressive, counter to the laws of Korea move. I want to beat the dead shit out of the bastards, but my wife won’t let me. If Korea had road rage, these wouldn’t happen. If Korea had a legal system that values life, Koreans would drive more sanely.

    I often say that Americans dare not drive so aggressively. I like to think it’s because we value life, but it might be because we don’t want to lose our houses and wages for the rest of our lives. It it’s the latter, it works for me.

    (BTW, Korea has a bigger problem with violence than gets reported. In civilized countries, we think of spousal and child abuse as violence and criminal. We have a concept of rape, which is, btw, non-consensual sex, that Koreans don’t have. We by law call the police in bullying incidents at school. We…)

  • bibimbong

    @29

    ur useful idiocy is amusing as always. but the assumption that things like stabbings just dont happen in korea is sorely misplaced. just this week in the middle of goddamn sinchon of all places a 16 year year old korean kid knifed a guy 40 frickin times.
    http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2012/05/117_110153.html

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    I’ll stick up for Keith, too. Korea and Koreans put the passage of cars before the protection of pedestrians. I see it EVERY (yes, I mean that literally) day. I walk with me children in a stroller, and some douche bag makes a highly aggressive, counter to the laws of Korea move.

    AnonJoe I don’t get what you are sticking up for…

    You are sticking up for Keith AGAINST dangerous CARS drivers harming pedestrians.

    But Keith wasn’t about that…

    Keith is AGAINST pedestrians stepping in front of his bicycle whilst he is travelling at 80~100 km per hour on his speed bicycle along a bicycle path along a recreational family bicycle path.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    ^ YotD, I stand corrected. I guess I was standing up for #27 Granfallon’s point.

  • Granfalloon

    I see the interaction between cars, cyclists, and pedestrians as being inherent interrelated and systemic. I consider my points and Keith’s (and AnonJoe’s) to be more or less different facets of the same argument.

    I’ll add that a general lack of enforcement of traffic laws is a contributing factor. Watching TV while driving is illegal, but the law is not enforced. As far as I can tell, and Korean legal scholars, please jump in here, Korean law is less preventative than the law that I grew up with, and more punitive. Unless someone is seriously hurt, there doesn’t seem to be as strong a notion that a crime has been committed.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    bikes are fine but the cyclists who wear those tights and helmets are pretty gay.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    told you Ron Paul won Iowa. nobody believed me then. well read ‘em and weep http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/03/ron-paul-delegates_n_1473035.html

    “WASHINGTON — A prominent Iowa Republican, and a major supporter of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, did not hesitate to answer when asked recently how many of the Hawkeye State’s 28 delegates he expects Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) to have heading into the national convention in Tampa this August.

    “Twenty,” he said.

    Conversations with numerous Iowa Republicans confirms the same thing: The state party establishment is dreading a Paul rout on June 15 and 16 at the two-day congressional district/state convention in Des Moines.”

    “”It does not sound encouraging. The Paul people are in a position to control the delegates, and the result would be chaotic for the Republican Party of Iowa and bring it to a screeching halt, rendering it completely irrelevant to our efforts here,” the Republican aide told The Huffington Post. “Nobody would rely on [the state party] for anything.”"

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    cyclists and their affects on young children – http://tiny.cc/3unvdw

  • YangachiBastardo
  • eujin

    Poor Koreans they have…a per capita GDP above the EU average

    I don’t think that’s the first time this statistic has been quoted on this site and it’s certainly not the first time I’ve had to look it up.

    In actual dollars there’s no comparison. For 2011 the IMF has;
    EU: $35,116
    Korea: $22,778

    The CIA Factbook has;
    EU: $35,200
    Korea: $23,900

    In dollars per bowl of ramyeon (PPP) things are a lot closer. Again for 2011 the IMF has;
    EU: $31,607
    Korea: $31,714

    And the CIA;
    EU: $34,000
    Korea: $31,700

    A squeaky win for the Koreans in one category from one source at least. Come back in a few years and it will probably be a different story, unless the Unification Ministry gets really busy. Go Bulgaria!

  • YangachiBastardo

    A squeaky win for the Koreans in one category from one source at least. Come back in a few years and it will probably be a different story, unless the Unification Ministry gets really busy

    Yes cos the value of the euro is of course realistic and stable and paying 1.76 euros for a liter of gas (as i did in Monte Carlo last week), 15 francs for a MCD meal (as i did in Lugano a few months ago) constitute real wealth.

    Let alone nominally makin’ 4000 euros a month and ending up with less than 2000 in your pocket, so single mothers can spit 4 kids from 4 different fathers without worrying about the financial consequences of their choice and crackheads can have their ass accomodated in some council shit hole. Not to mention all these valuable public workers retiring at 52, full benefits.

    The superior wealth of Europe is absolutely striking in the rich Northern fringe of the continent where there’s one brand of milk available (rich oil Norway a few months ago had a shortage of butter) and buying and registering a car any Korean middle class family consider absolutely normal cost in the 100k+ euros range.
    NOt to mention the striking appearance of the bycicle-driving, Birkenstock and H&M donnin’ locals.

    Who wouldn’t want to aspire to such a rich, lavish lifestyle ?

    That’s TRUE civilisation

    Go Europe, you’re the best !!!

    The CIA factbook is a joke and Korean net salaries are consistently weighted by the OECD in the top 5, way above France, Germany, Denmark etc etc.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    JD (#53): “told you Ron Paul won Iowa. nobody believed me then.”

    Foolish earthling. Nobody needed to believe YOU, bromide. We clicked the link and saw that your information was trustworthy . . . this time. We saw no need to confirm the obvious, but our posts indicated our understanding. To our delight, you evinced an inability to read that reflects your oblique orthography. Also a lack of humor. Delicious.

    Oh, almost forgot. Vote for Kodos. Or Kang. If you can prove you’re not a robot . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • YangachiBastardo

    @ 48 So you’re telling me with a straight face the Korean crime rate is on par with any Western country ?

    I got some some social media stock for you, the company is worth 100 billions

  • Anathema

    Yangachi, why on earth would you go to Lugano and eat McDonald’s? Most unbelievable thing I’ve ever seen you write here.

  • YangachiBastardo

    Yangachi, why on earth would you go to Lugano and eat McDonald’s? Most unbelievable thing I’ve ever seen you write here

    1) had to meet with my accountant to change the director of a company i have there

    2) I was hungry and i was in a hurry to come back to Milan

    Honestly what’s so incredible about it ????

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    On his single parents salary he couldn’t afford the fondue, raclette or rösti.

  • YangachiBastardo

    On his single parents salary he couldn’t afford the fondue, raclette or rösti

    Yep not everybody has been blessed in their life with the luck of being born among one of the most abjectly poor, ignorant and discriminated ethnic minorities in the Western world and movin’ to Korea to basically babysit snotty local children for a living

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    just follow what you were meant to be:
    4 5am – 7 am East “I Relax” Spring, March
    Wood Negative Pearl Grey Yang

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    (Thats my figures not yours)

    don’t take what I said so badly – even Potter travelled all the way to
    Hogwarts just to eat McDonalds – http://tiny.cc/pzsvdw

  • jkitchstk

    Republicans, Get In My Vagina!
    Kate Beckinsale, Judy Greer and Andrea Savage “spread” the message that the one thing women really want in their vagina is the government.
    http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/87be7156f5/republicans-get-in-my-vagina

  • YangachiBastardo

    just follow what you were meant to be:
    4 5am – 7 am East “I Relax” Spring, March
    Wood Negative Pearl Grey Yang

    ????

  • Creo69

    “snotty local children”

    It always cracks me up how you are a total hypocrite. Always whinning about anyone who is slightly critical of anything they don’t
    like about Korea but this is how you describe Korean kids. Nice:-)

  • YangachiBastardo

    So there are no snotty kids in Korea ? Strange i thought there were snotty kids everywhere. Boys will be boys and girls will be girls

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    just follow what you were meant to be:
    4 5am – 7 am East “I Relax” Spring, March
    Wood Negative Pearl Grey Yang

    ????

    Thats the statistics of a person born in the year of the rabbit.

    It also cracks me up and amazes me how arrogant, hypocritical, ignorant and discriminating Europeans and Americans (talking about Yangachi and others are here) always bringing up or referring to how “bad it is” or how “sad it is” that I am indigenous Australian.

    The fact is – my parents are very wealthy. I grew up and was raised in an affluent family. Stop using the “Oh you are indigenous – it’s not working – [pawi was the first to use that, and so copying him is just futile] you need to think up something different to ridicule me…. by using the indigenous thing… you are just showing how racist, arrogant, hypocritical, ignorant and discriminating you are.”

  • Creo69

    Nice attempt to back out of your negative generalization of Korean children…sadly it won’t hold water with anyone who speaks English which is about 99.9% of the people who follow this blog.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    (I wasn’t born among one of the most abjectly poor, ignorant and discriminated ethnic minorities in the Western world) – I grew up and was raised by wealthy parents…..

  • Anathema

    Oh, was just wondering why anyone would eat McDonald’s in Switzerland when there are so many other superior options.

    BTW, do you know this band:

    http://www.metal-archives.com/bands/Black_Hole/10520

    Land Of Mystery is a great album, in the vein of Paul Chain, but pretty hard to find.

  • YangachiBastardo

    Nice attempt to back out of your negative generalization of Korean children

    OH ! Snotty wasn’t meant to be negative, it’s just like bratty or sassy or whatever quality is associated with little kids…English is my very distant second language and i never claimed to have any decent command of it (even if i have to admit reading YOTD comments kinda make me feel better about my language skills).

    Actually i’ll tell you an anecdote: my son tutor apparently teaches some international summer school class in the UK too. She told me the 2 main nationalities of the student body are the Koreans and the Poles.

    Her laconic comment:” Koreans are very good, Poles are beyond good and evil”

    I grew up and was raised by wealthy parents…..

    And you ended up locked in dead-end job in a country you don’t like much (i remember when you got upset after i suggested you look for another job in your homeland) ? I can tell you were the success story of the family, sport

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    maybe you and Anathema can get together – your kid could finally get a mother, instead of all the hoes your bring over…

  • YangachiBastardo

    Anathema: honestly i don’t but you really got me curious cos Verona is where my mom was born and in 1981 it was a pretty fucked up, depressive place.

    PS

    I suggest you don’t mention the P.C: name or any other name associated with his early band as they have a solid reputation of bein major jinxes :)

    PPS

    This will give you a good laugh: at the solid age of 37 i discovered the first Bathory album..and it’s fuckin blastin on repeat ever since, i honestly don’t care much for their later “classics”

  • Jieun K

    Thus, Jean-Paul Sartre wrote: l’enfer, c’est les autres.

    snotty local children

    Plenty of them in Korea, whatever the intended meaning.

    why anyone would eat McDonald’s in Switzerland when there are so many other superior options

    Classic example of how not to MYOB.

  • Anathema

    Strange that you would like the first Bathory and not the second, as I feel the second is in the same vein as the first, yet an improvement.

    If you like the first Bathory album, you must like Italy’s Bulldozer! Also very Venom-ish.

    Year Of The Dragon, what are you on about?

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    just having fun…

  • YangachiBastardo

    It also cracks me up and amazes me how arrogant, hypocritical, ignorant and discriminating Europeans and Americans (talking about Yangachi and others are here)

    You brought up the subject of my poverty first, mate so take it and give it like a man.

    I was born very poor in a poorer European country and i have absolutely no problem with that. I’m doing ok now, even if i’m obviously worried and depressed with the perilous economic situation of my country specifically and the Continent at large.

    NO shame with lack of money really, meny easy come and easy go.

    Annd don’t worry i don’t bring hoes at home, actually since this is an anonymous internet blog i’ll easily confess i had very few partners in my life as i’m painfully shy with women and sure i’m not at risk of being mistaken with a fashion model.

    Me and Anathema had our quarrel in the past but he’s a cool dude who can fire back without taking offense.

    And as much as i like to tease him about metal, again protected by internet anonimity i’ll confess i have a visceral love for the genre, my early teenagehood was defined by bands like Slayer, Helloween, Destruction, Venom, Sodom and Voivod

  • YangachiBastardo

    Anathema: bingo ! Everybody seems to love The Return, imho it lacks that raw immediateness of songs like War.

    Bulldozer lol you know their leader Andy ended up involved in the euro-dance scene and made quite a bit of cash distributing that shit in Japan

    (i swear the God i’m serious, not makin’ shit up)

  • Creo69

    “English is my very distant second language and i never claimed to have any decent command of…”

    My apologies…didn’t realize you intended “snotty” to be a compliment when you were generalizing about Korean kids. All cleared up now. I guess you’ re not the total hypocrite you appear to be.

  • YangachiBastardo

    I guess you’ re not the total hypocrite you appear to be.

    You’re some irritating, funny bastard (yes it’s meant as a compliment)

    ;)

  • Creo69

    “You’re some irritating, funny bastard (yes it’s meant as a compliment)”

    Opps…I meant to say, I guess you’ re not the total hypocrite you appeared (not “appear”) to be. Even us engrishy teachers don’t have the best command of the English language at times.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Ahhh! A happy ending!

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Oops… I meant to say, A happy ending, but we are still short $3000 for the weekend.

  • paulhewson

    “Like Sam the butcher
    bringing Alice the MEAT
    Like Fred Flintstone
    driving around with bald FEET
    SHAKE YOUR RRRUUUMMMPPPAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    Yangachi, why on earth would you go to Lugano and eat McDonald’s? Most unbelievable thing I’ve ever seen you write here.

    Hey, guess which country is the one where McDonalds makes its second-largest profits in the world? It ain’t China, guy — it’s France. Seems as if Ronald has got the European consumer’s pulse.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Yeah.. I can log off now.. you guys are taking over the evening shift.

  • Creo69

    McDonald’s “Value Meals” will be popular for the foreseeable future in Europe…no doubt of that.

  • Savant

    I’ll stick up for Keith, too.

    I had a similar bike experience last Summer too, only with mine, both mum and dad were on the opposite side of the path leaving a young boy all alone on the other side.
    Journey through Yeouido on a bike and you witness countless Koreans on bike and without (young and old) who have no concept of personal safety to themselves or others. Less than 20% (maybe, too generous) of Koreans bother to look when stepping out onto the bike path. If I get hit; it’s your fault for not seeing me and not mine for being a complete idiot. Idiots are King in Korea!

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    McDonald’s “Value Meals” will be popular for the foreseeable future in Europe… no doubt of that.

    And in America. From the Washington Post: “If the same percentage of adults were in the workforce today as when Barack Obama took office, the unemployment rate would be 11.1 percent. If the percentage was where it was when George W. Bush took office, the unemployment rate would be 13.1 percent.”

  • keith

    I’m quite flattered that a mild post from me about child safety and irresponsible parenting turned into a phenomenal character attack! I’m flattered and also humbled. Thank you from the bottom of my scrotum.

    Too many people have gone at me, but I’ll answer the most important questions from the fans. To some of the very silly people – I don’t hate Korea, if I really hated it I would’t live here. I don’t hate all Korean food, I actually had a delicious meal with my wonderful Korean in-laws earlier. I helped make a lot of it, yes even some Korean dishes. I live in a nice house, I eat well, I make OK money, I have a great social life. What’s to hate? I like Korea generally, there are far worse places to live.

    In regards to bike fashion-etiquette. I don’t dress up when I go out on the bike. I wear shorts and a t-shirt, I’m very careful when I ride, I try not to run over children. I look where I’m going.

    Cycling is easy.

    Regarding ‘snotty kids’. I have one special student with a ‘bogey obsession’, the dirty little bugger is obsessed with his snot. If he’s not eating it he’s trying to wipe it on anyone or anything nearby. I always wisely keep my distance from that one. His English name is ‘Dave’, my wonderful Korean colleagues and I just call him ‘The Snot Monster’.

  • keith

    PS. I was very happy to someone claim I could do between 80-100 kmph on my bike! I wish. If I could do those kinds of speeds on a bicycle I’d be in London for the summer Olympics and would break all the cycling records. I wish I was that fast, but it isn’t going to happen.

  • gbnhj

    Anyone looking at gross per-capita income info and drawing conclusions about relative wealth is only looking at part of the picture. Want to understand your position better? Take your net income relative to the national average, and you’ll see what your earnings bring you. Want to spend it all? Go ahead – you’ll have nothing left, and will be in the same boat as all the other broke-ass folks all over the world. Want to keep it? Go ahead – keep what you can, and then compare your retained wealth with what others have.

    Basically, it’s not what you earn, but what you have, that determines how wealthy you are.

  • feld_dog

    chiming in on the MCA props.
    I remember hating “Fight For Your Right”, thinking that the Beastie Boys were morons and that they’d be one hit wonders. So, so wrong. Last night at FF in Hongdae with the late-night DJ crowd, I requested “Sure Shot”, “Root Down” or “Shake Your Rump.” So what does he play? Fight for Your Fucking Right. Not a good dance song, that.
    Anyway, RIP Adam Yauch. Hope someone’s laying down some mad kaddish.

  • Creo69

    “And in America. From the Washington Post: “If the same percentage of adults were in the workforce today as when Barack Obama took office, the unemployment rate would be 11.1 percent. If the percentage was where it was when George W. Bush took office, the unemployment rate would be 13.1 percent.”

    The article said many baby boomers are choosing to retire as a result of the recession. Great! Their fing greed is part of the reason the US got into this mess. Personally, I would be happy to see them all get out of the workforce.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Basically, it’s not what you earn, but what you have, that determines how wealthy you are.

    Let me tell you something…

    even wealthy billionaires feel like shit every day…

    money doesn’t bring happiness… in fact it brings more problems….

    just be happy you are free and healthy.

  • bibimbong

    @59 you’ve visited a couple times that’s it right? please make ur home here.

  • keyinjpop

    Japanese AV actress to make her singing debut in Korea:
    http://www.allkpop.com/2012/05/japanese-av-star-aoi-sora-to-debut-in-korea-as-singer-actress
    Here’s hoping no controversy arises.

  • http://geoju.kr fanwarrior

    #93 Your post wasn’t about child safety. It was using child safety as a pretext to claim Korea isn’t a 1st world country.
    These are two different things.

    The vapid “who me?” defence really gives the trolling away.

  • R. Elgin

    I really am surprised at the number of Koreans that are so easily duped over the Cheonan attack. I spoke last night to a gentleman that used to work for the Kim that shot Park Chung-hee and this fellow believes that an Israeli submarine sank that ship.

    I can only shake my head over this bs. I checked his information and found it lead back to Chinese sources, once again.

  • YangachiBastardo

    @59 you’ve visited a couple times that’s it right? please make ur home here

    Believe me if i could i would tomorrow morning without lookin’ back. And i hope the company i work for will one day promote me to a position in Asia.

    Maybe you don’t have any idea how life is around where i live: those lucky enough to have a job paying a living wage live in terror of loosin’ it. We don’t know if we’re gonna be able to feed our kids 6 months from now, we don’t know if we’re gonna end up like Greece where a growing number of children is malnourished.

    We don’t know what kind of country we’re gonna pass to the next generation, a place were trash goes growingly uncollected, where school buildings literally fall over the heads of our children, where we have to pay money we don’t have for a private school tuition, as they’re the only institutions where gang-stabbings are not an every day reality.

    A place where suicides, madness and drug addiction are the only prospect for a significant percentage of the population.

    This place is turnin’ into a giant, chaotic ghetto and i should feel sorry for the Korean expat community cos well they have to deal with a few ajeossi drivin’ like shit and yelling while drunk ?

  • dogbertt

    #93 Your post wasn’t about child safety. It was using child safety as a pretext to claim Korea isn’t a 1st world country.
    These are two different things.

    The vapid “who me?” defence really gives the trolling away.

    Just so. This is the point that needs to be repeatedly made when KeeftheChav pops his ugly scrotum up.

    You’re 50 years too late trying to make Korea pink on the map, chavmeister. Acknowledge your failure to thrive in your home country and humbly accede to Korean cultural mores.

  • YangachiBastardo

    always bringing up or referring to how “bad it is” or how “sad it is” that I am indigenous Australian

    The only sad and bad things here are the many times you disparaged, completely unprovoked, the country that put food on your table, even claiming how Japanese colonisation was a net positive for Korea. So as you seem to like to sling shit like that, expect some in return Richie Rich teaching engrishe.

    On a personal note, as you once brought up, again completely unprovoked, how Italian parents used to sell their kids a century ago, i’d like to remind you how when my ancestors were busy inventing paved roads, modern architecture, civil law and aqueducts, your tribe of Australopithecus Afarensis homunculuses were squatting in hay shacks and subsisting on a cannibalistic diet

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    No one really knows who their ancestors are. Somewhere along the line, in every lineage, an adulterous affair traces a different line of descent . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • Q

    @ R. Elgin (#102),

    They would be as much confused people as 911 conspiracy theorists:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9/11_conspiracy_theories

  • bibimbong

    @103

    i pray for a release for you and urs from the post-apocalyptic nightmare metropolis that is . . . milan.

    “A place where suicides, madness and drug addiction are the only prospect for a significant percentage of the population.”

    someday soon perhaps you will reach our shining shores where the streets are paved with gold and but for the screams of the occasional drunken fellow or snot nosed child all is peacefulness and light. until then brother fight on in ur ‘giant chaotic ghetto’.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Yangachi you’re an angry man – your insults just don’t stop.

    No wonder Italy is so messed up, following along behind Greece.

    If all Italians are like you – then all that wasted energy wasted on anger that could have been channelled into developing a great economy and a prosperous – too bad.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    Interesting twist this one took. While I think that Korea is a first-world country and a nice place to live in most respects, I will say this: I’ve been to almost forty countries and I’ve never seen a place where people fail to look where they’re going like they do here.

  • jk6411

    YOTD and YB,

    Okay, you guys can stop now.
    It’s the start of another week.

  • PineForest

    Here’s my two cents that noone will probably read: Koreans can improve at paying attention to their surroundings. It’s definitely a problem, and a hard one to understand.

    Italians can improve on not being so sold on their past that they don’t tend to the present.

    Americans can improve in 1,000 ways that I don’t have time to go into.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    “Americans can improve in 1,000 ways that I don’t have time to go into.”

    Make that 1001! There’s always another way . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • keith

    Dogdirt, nobody claims any country or citizens are perfect. I’m just really confused, as Pineforest obviously is too, about the general lack of awareness of their surroundings that so many Korean have. It’s very dangerous indeed and seems to be somewhat of a trait among sons and daughters of Han.

    Taxi drivers watching TV whilst driving, people walking into walls because they’re watching dramas on their cellphones, kids running whilst looking backwards and running into people, walls and other obstructions, parents instructing their kid to run into a busy bike path, a good friend of mine is an avid skier and he has told me that the ski slopes here are amongst the most dangerous he’s used in the world, he has skied all over Europe, North America, Japan at loads of slopes, according to him Koreans are the most dangerous skiers he’s ever seen and there are loads of serious accidents on Korean slopes.

    Does eating too much kimchi cause blindness or something? I had a bus driver yell ‘Bballi’ at me the other day, he had parked the bus in a middle of a busy road for me to get on, he had to park there as people had parked their vehicles in very dangerous positions, and a few scooters were weaving about the place. Now I might be look like a hesitant fool to an irresponsible and impatient bus driver, but I usually look carefully when I walk out into a busy road and I’m not going to get out of that very sensible habit just to save him 2 seconds out of his busy day.

    Where I grew up we had this chap http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRUBMBi_lp4&feature=related Korea needs an equivalent to warn both adults and children of the dangers of not paying attention to their surroundings.

  • YangachiBastardo

    No wonder Italy is so messed up, following along behind Greece

    Don’t worry, the day we go kaboooooooom, the rest of the world follow suit. Let me break down some figures for you: we have approx. 5 trillion euros in debts, between corporate, household and government. Yep you read that figure correctly: more than 3 times our GDP. Around 50% of that amount is owned by foreign institutions. A 3 trillion $$$ guano bomb that could go off at any given time.

    God only knows what are the net derivatives position written on that huge stash of funny money. When finally we tell the world to fuck off and we stop paying, it will make 2008 look like a romantic walk on the beach at sunset. The alternative is a massive printing process, a Nth power LTRO…either one is not particularly pleasant for obvious reasons. That’s why everytime we sneeze, world markets shake in fear.

    And that’s not even counting the trade ties we have with the rest of the world, as we are like the 7th largest exporter and the 8th largest importer on the planet. Not to mention our bankruptcy would push France, a country with even worse fundamentals and a significantly bigger economy, off the cliff.

    This will teach the world a valuable lesson though: don’t do business with a bunch of gypsies, pretending they are first world only cos it helps inflating your own domestic bubbles, it’s a dangerous game really.

    Okay, you guys can stop now.
    It’s the start of another week

    Agreed

    the general lack of awareness of their surroundings that so many Korean have. It’s very dangerous indeed and seems to be somewhat of a trait among sons and daughters of Han

    Koreans can improve at paying attention to their surroundings. It’s definitely a problem, and a hard one to understand.

    I’ve been to almost forty countries and I’ve never seen a place where people fail to look where they’re going like they do here

    My 2 cents: Korea is a young democracy, albeit not an extremely young one. It is not uncommon for young democracies to show a certain disdain for law enforcement and rules in general.

    Also Korea is a very capitalistic society, way more so than North America. As a byproduct we might have a society not excessively concerned with safety and regulations. To a European eye even Americans seem to a be an absent-minded, happy-go lucky, take-unnecessary-risk lot.

    I’m not surprised to find among an overly dynamic population a carefree approach to everyday risk management

    If the same percentage of adults were in the workforce today as when Barack Obama took office, the unemployment rate would be 11.1 percent. If the percentage was where it was when George W. Bush took office, the unemployment rate would be 13.1 percent

    The article said many baby boomers are choosing to retire as a result of the recession. Great! Their fing greed is part of the reason the US got into this mess. Personally, I would be happy to see them all get out of the workforce

    America has a massive unemployment and underemployment problem, comparable to Southern Europe. The difference is that the employed segment of the US population is more productive than Southern European labor and the debt spigots are still open.

    someday soon perhaps you will reach our shining shores where the streets are paved with gold and but for the screams of the occasional drunken fellow or snot nosed child all is peacefulness and light. until then brother fight on in ur ‘giant chaotic ghetto’.

    On top of fuckin’ everything my favourite ice cream store in the neighbourhood has a new management, i really fear for my cremino chocolate ice :)

  • jk6411

    keith @#114,

    I’m just really confused, as Pineforest obviously is too, about the general lack of awareness of their surroundings that so many Korean have. It’s very dangerous indeed and seems to be somewhat of a trait among sons and daughters of Han.

    Dude, give me a break.
    No one wants to get killed.

    As for Korean ski slopes..
    They’re pretty crowded; that’s probably why there are more accidents.
    I’ve had close calls skiing in the States as well as Korea.
    (Again, no one wants to ski into a tree and then get airlifted to a hospital.)

    I like Korea because it’s more carefree (for a Korean like me, at least).
    On the other hand, I’ve always wished that Koreans would follow the traffic laws more.
    Koreans are a bit impatient, I admit that.

    Taxi drivers watching TV whilst driving

    Geez, do you know how many accidents there are in the U.S. everyday b/c of idiots who text while driving? A TV is not the only source of distraction.
    People do all sorts of things while driving: eat breakfast, put makeup on, shave, text, fiddle with their iPod, etc, etc.
    (And let’s not forget all those drivers who are driving while high on something..)

    We’re all distracted by digital devices.
    I can’t believe you’re only accusing Koreans of this and attributing it to their “Han” heritage.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    #115 YangachiBastardo: “My 2 cents: Korea is a young democracy, albeit not an extremely young one. It is not uncommon for young democracies to show a certain disdain for law enforcement and rules in general.

    Also Korea is a very capitalistic society, way more so than North America. As a byproduct we might have a society not excessively concerned with safety and regulations.”

    Koreans “show a certain disdain for law enforcement and rules in general” because the law is not enforced and is not enforceable. Police officers do nothing to enforce the law, and laws have no provisions for punishment. For example, watching TV while operating a motor vehicle is against the law in Korea; however,
    “Although the law bans drivers from watching television while driving, there isn’t any (specific) penalty when caught, so we can’t do anything about it,”
    a Euiseong police spokesman told AFP.

  • Q

    Less than 10 years ago in the most States of America, there’d be no laws that restrict watching DVD while driving. Seattlepi news article of 2004 reports: Laws can’t keep up with on-the-go gadgets, DVD players, PDAs escape regulation:

    So far, only Louisiana and California have made it illegal for the driver to watch DVDs or videos

    a man in New York was stopped for watching porn on a screen in his passenger-side sun visor. It wasn’t the driving and viewing that the state objected to; it was the public display of sexual material. He was sentenced to three weekends in jail.

  • Seth Gecko

    Q, you really ARE all about the tu quoque.

  • brier

    What? No political coverage of the great UPPity vote rigging debacle here at the Hole? Is TK dropping the ball on this one?

  • Anonymous_Joe

    118 Q: “Less than 10 years ago in the most States of America, there’d be no laws that restrict watching DVD while driving. “

    And the United States had no laws against operating a motor vehicle while under the influence 150 years ago. Q really is the king of logical fallacies.

    DVD players in cars were a relatively new technology 10 years ago. American law does not always keep pace with technology’s breakneck speed. Once American law does catch up, the law is enforced and enforceable.

    Korean law is a joke except for the law that says you can’t criticize Korean law.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    A Japanese School in New Jersey has won a lawsuit brought by a Korean-American who did not like the school’s using a Japanese Social Studies textbook that taught that Takeshima (Dokdo) was Japanese territory. You can read more about the lawsuit at “Japan Probe” HERE.

    In the footnotes of her legal decision HERE, the judge made the following comment:

    As a former civil mediator, it would certainly be tempting to suggest that this historic Asian-Pacific dispute, which apparently remains the cause of wide-ranging emotions and politics on both sides, be settled through a designation of one islet to each country. Clearly, if the solution were that simple, it would have occurred before today.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    @122

    I hope this clown and his lawyers get nailed for court costs and attorneys’ fees for wasting the time and resources of the NJ state court and the state and local education offices, i.e., taxpayers’ money, for bringing this utterly frivolous, vanity suit.

  • Q

    @ Anonymous_Joe (#121)

    I would not deny Korean laws have lots of loopholes and many limits in its enforceability. However, considering the short history of democracy, I’d assume S. Korea could a successful model for other developing countries. American laws of democracy have much longer history, but it has not always enforced nor enforceable. I would take some examples of problems of widespread illicit drug use, illegal immigration, corruption in Wall Street, OJ Simpson case, and so on. LA riots would be another example that American laws are hard to be enforced nor enforceable in certain cases. I would not make simple comparison between the US and S. Korea, but it would be helpful to take both sides on account because many commenter at the Hole are from English speaking countries who have exceptional interest in Korea issues.

    @gbevers (#122),

    Japanese right-wing LDP politicians visited Palisades Park memorial and protested in vain. Chosun Ilbo reports: 日 의원들, 미국내 ‘위안부 기림비’ 생트집:

    로툰도 시장은 기림비는 한국인들이 세운 것이 아니라 미국 시민의 세금으로 세워졌으며 시 의회에서는 충분한 자료와 역사적인 사실을 확인하고 입증한 후에 건립했다고 반박했다.

    로툰도 시장은 이어 사실이 아니라는 주장을 펴려면 근거 있는 자료나 데이터를 제시해야 할 것이라고 강조했다.

    특히 이 자리에 참석한 팰리세이즈파큭시의 행정관은 대화 도중 그 자리에서 태블릿PC로 일본 외무성의 홈페이지에 접속, 일본 정부가 위안부를 인정하고 사과했던 내용을 보여주면서 일본 정부의 공식적인 입장이 홈페이지에 나와 있다고 지적했다.

    그러자 자민당 내 북한일본인납치특별위원회를 이끌고 있는 푸루야 위원장은 “이는 과거의 입장이며, 지금은 완전히 바뀌었다”고 주장하기도 했다.

    여성의원 야마타니는 당시 군대 위안부의 대다수는 일본여성이었으며 다른 나라 여성은 아주 소수였다고 말했다.

    이에 대해 기림비를 제작한 화가 스티브 까발로 씨는 “십수년동안 위안부 문제를 연구했고 모든 것이 사실임을 확인했다. 피해자 할머니들을 직접 인터뷰하고 대화하면서 모든 것이 진실임을 확신했다”고 반박했다.

  • Q

    I would like to say that Prohibition of Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution could be not effectively enforced. Gun-related fatalities and injuries might be in the similar category. Still, I’d say that US laws had been built up upon a lot more trials and errors and more stable than other nations.

  • yuna

    I saw this and thought of all of you’s.

    http://media.daum.net/photo/2795?t__nil_news=img&nil_id=10#20120508120213736
    (Mexican girl helper at the presidential candidate debate, doesn’t she look like Jessica Gomez?)

  • Anonymous_Joe

    @Q #124

    I appreciate the measured tone in your dissenting opinion.

    Although Korea is a young democracy, Korea did not blaze that trail and has several more successful paths, the U.S.’s being one, to follow in setting up its legal system. In a world before advanced communications, the “we don’t know how to because we are new here and are figuring it out” argument might work. Today, not so much.

    I think that the problem is more cultural. Korea at its core is Confucian, which holds the idea that those born well and in high places perform their duties and live their lives worthy of their births and positions. The order of the universe depends on that idea, and don’t question it.

    In the West, we hold to Lord Acton’s dictum that absolute power corrupts, and …well, you know the rest.

  • Q

    The key point of Dokdo in viewing Dokdo issue is SCAPIN No. 677 dictated by General Headquarters Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers:

    Japan is defined to include the four main islands of Japan (Hokkaido, Honshu, Kyushu and Shikoku) and the approximately 1,000 smaller adjacent islands, including the Tsushima Islands and the Ryukyu (Nansei) Islands north of 30° North Latitude (excluding Kuchinoshima Island); and excluding (a) Utsuryo (Ullung) Island, Liancourt Rocks (Take Island) and Quelpart (Saishu or Cheju) Island

    The SCAPIN has been revised twice: SCAPIN 841 issued on March 22, 1946 returning Izu and Nanpo Islands to Japan; the revised SCAPIN 677 dated December 5, 1951 returned the islands between 30-29 degree N. latitude and Kagoshima Ten Village Islands to Japanese sovereignty. However, no such directives, memoranda and/or orders were ever issued to change the separation of Dokdo. The territorial provisions in the 1951 San Francisco Peace Treaty merely conformed what had already become an accomplished fact. The separation of Dokdo by SCAPIN No. 677 — so far as it has not been changed specifically — should be acknowledged and respected as the accomplished facts which were actually carried into effect by the Peace Treaty. (Source: Professor Young K Kim, A Suggestion for an Impeccable logical integrity, Dec. 2011
    )

  • jk6411

    Joe @#127

    In a world before advanced communications, the “we don’t know how to because we are new here and are figuring it out” argument might work. Today, not so much.

    Dude, DMB TV’s are not even available in the U.S..

  • Anonymous_Joe

    jk6411 @ 129

    Bro, way to miss the forest for what’s not even a tree.

  • YangachiBastardo

    American law does not always keep pace with technology’s breakneck speed

    You open a can of worms for legal system throughout the world here…think only of all the issues surrounding data protection and privacy

    Once American law does catch up, the law is enforced and enforceable

    It depends on the neighbourhood, what is enforceable and enforced Northside Chicago is NOT what is enforceable and enforced Westside

  • Banana Stache

    http://bit.ly/JezPuZ
    Looking up the definition of 충실 in the Naver dictionary and disappointed to find “충실하게 일하다 work like a horse[nigger]” as the 9th example listed.

    To be fair to naver the source is Dong-a’s Prime Korean-English Dictionary.

    Nonetheless, a bitterness in my stomach.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    Ron Paul Has Victories In Nevada Maine Louisiana Massachusetts Alaska Iowa Minnesota & Washington! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgqueilR-2U

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    “Ron Paul Has Victories In Nevada Maine Louisiana Massachusetts Alaska Iowa Minnesota & Washington!”

    Wow! A few more victories, he’ll have the nomination sewn up . . . if he doesn’t fall off the bandwagon and under the wheels . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • yuna

    http://media.daum.net/foreign/topic/newsview?newsid=20120509181715685&cateid=1075
    Man goes into hospital after eating skewered meat from Beijing street stalls – there is suspicion of ingesting rat poison and sellers using rat meat as lamb/mutton BBQ. Often dog meat or cat meat can get dressed up as mutton but this is making people angry.

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr
  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Greece. Making Korea look like an absolute financial crisis saint:

    http://edition.cnn.com/2012/05/08/world/europe/europe-far-right-austerity/?hpt=wo_c1

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Brendon,

    It doesn’t matter how unpopular Obama is in a red state. All Obama needs are all the traditional blue states and Ohio and/or Florida. If he gets that then bang. Four more years. Listen, I’m not a fan, but I’m just stating facts.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Here’s another one:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/05/09/us-greece-voters-idUSBRE84810220120509

    Anyone who criticized Korea’s overall reaction to the ’98 economic crisis should eat their proverbial crow…

  • bumfromkorea

    @ brendon & Wangkon

    Actually, if Obama can get the Hispanic-heavy Western states, I believe the electoral math will allow Obama to win the election without either Ohio or Florida. And you know how ‘appealing’ GOP has been to Hispanic Americans for the past 12 years…

    At least in AZ, the Hispanic Americans are getting ready. I’m guessing the upcoming SCOTUS decision on SB 1070 isn’t going to help either.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    It appears there are plenty of people who hate Obama… they just don’t live in the right states IMHO.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Because West Virginia is a great yardstick for the rest of America. Here’s some interesting facts for you to chew on, counsellor .

    According to the exit polls, West Virginia’s voters revealed that they are the most racist in the country so far in the Democratic primaries. Fully 20% of the voters consisted of whites who reported that race was a factor, and they voted for Clinton 84-10 over Obama. That’s a total racist vote of 17%, exceeding the racist vote in all of the previous primaries where exit polls were taken, and going far above the 13.7% in Arkansas, the most racist state before now in this election.

    Nice folk!

    In slightly different news, Obama has just come out and supported gay marriage. As a libertarian and someone who believes (if I recall correctly) gay people ought to have the same rights as heterosexuals, what are your thoughts?

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    Obama has just come out and supported gay marriage. As a libertarian and someone who believes (if I recall correctly) gay people ought to have the same rights as heterosexuals, what are your thoughts?

    Gay people are entitled to the same rights, so you know the answer. If they want to get married, good. A larger question is whether the government ought to be in the marriage business in the first place — and if it’s a proper role for government, is it the place of the Federal government or of the states to regulate marriage?

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    I’m no expert on this, but it seems to me that Obama is simply offering an opinion, and if anything – by refusing to spend federal money defending the Defense of Marriage Act – has actually removed some government interference.

  • sluggh

    @140:

    Obama has no chance — none — of carrying Arizona. And SB 1070 is not the divisive issue La Raza would have you believe. Even the Supremes have found little fault in it.

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    Refusing to defend the Defense of Marriage Act is a dereliction of his Constitutional duty as the chief executive, and a further usurpation of the powers allotted to the other two branches of government. The executive branch has a duty to execute and enforce the laws adopted by the legislature. The judiciary has the power to decide what is and is not a “proper” law adopted by the legislature.

  • bumfromkorea

    I haven’t read even a single statement written by La Raza. I live in Arizona – I know what’s going on in this state.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Refusing to defend the Defense of Marriage Act is a dereliction of his Constitutional duty as the chief executive, and a further usurpation of the powers allotted to the other two branches of government.

    I was under the impression (much like the US Supreme Court) that the President may refuse to enforce a law if he/she can 1) argue that the law is unconstitutional and 2) expect that the Supreme Court will rule in his favor.

    In other words, if the President can make a sound, legal argument that a law is unconstitutional, he has the *right* to defy that law.

    Am I wrong?

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    Yes, you’re wrong. However, you’re in good company, with former Clinton White House Counsel Abner Mikva as well as Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. The idea that the President can disregard laws he believes to be unconstitutional has been asserted for almost 70 years, but has not been finally adjudicated by direct challenge. A passing comment in a concurring opinion is not law — it’s dictum.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    Hoju_Saram quoted:

    According to the exit polls, West Virginia’s voters revealed that they are the most racist in the country so far in the Democratic primaries. Fully 20% of the voters consisted of whites who reported that race was a factor, and they voted for Clinton 84-10 over Obama.

    Obama got 96% of the Black vote. I wonder how many Blacks, besides Samuel Jackson, voted for Obama because he was Black.

    Hoju_Saram also wrote:

    As a libertarian and someone who believes (if I recall correctly) gay people ought to have the same rights as heterosexuals, what are your thoughts?

    As a libertarian, do you also support marriage between a man and three women? A mother and her son? A father and his daughter? A brother and his sister? A teacher and his student? A child molester and a woman with three young children? A man and his pet sheep? A vampire and a werewolf? Any person and the object of that person’s love?

    Aren’t you saying, “If two people love each other, why deny them the right to marital bliss and the legal benefits of marriage?” If you want to go down that road, shouldn’t a brother and sister in love, or anyone in love, have the same right to marry as two men in love or two women in love?

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    As a libertarian, do you also support marriage between a man and three women? A mother and her son? A father and his daughter? A brother and his sister? A teacher and his student? A child molester and a woman with three young children? A man and his pet sheep? A vampire and a werewolf? Any person and the object of that person’s love?

    You know, I was thinking something along the same lines today after reading something Roboseyo posted on his Facebook about the younger generation being tired of the “culture wars” and politicized churches regarding homosexuals:

    http://rachelheldevans.com/win-culture-war-lose-generation-amendment-one-north-carolina

    Mind you, I’d prefer the state out of the marriage business entirely, and as far as homosexuality is concerned, I won’t ask where you put your genitals if you don’t ask me where I put mine. Still, I can’t help but think the “culture war” won’t look so tiring when it’s other social and cultural constructs being questioned, like anti-polygamy and anti-incest laws. Anyhow, I do wonder which supposedly silly taboos we hold dear our children will be raging against when they grow up.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    The state has historically liked and supported marriage for one simple reason. Married people have babies and, at least theoretically, a more stable environment to raise productive human beings, Thus, it is an instrument it create more peasants, serfs, artisans, tax payers, productive individuals, etc. whatever you wanna call them. Thus, the state likes being in the marriage business because it literally increases the size of the state.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    “… instrument TO create more…”

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Obama got 96% of the Black vote. I wonder how many Blacks, besides Samuel Jackson, voted for Obama because he was Black.

    Irrelevant to the current discussion. Brendon’s sarcastic comment inferred that he believes the West Virginian vote indicates that Obama doesn’t have the election in the bag. I pointed out that the West Virginian vote is not indicative of wider American voting habits, and is therefore not a good yardstick. Black people have already proven they’ll vote for Obama – they’ll likely do so again. Is this ethical? No. Is it relevant to the current topic? No.

    As a libertarian, do you also support marriage between a man and three women? A mother and her son? A father and his daughter? A brother and his sister? A teacher and his student? A child molester and a woman with three young children? A man and his pet sheep? A vampire and a werewolf? Any person and the object of that person’s love?

    You’ll notice I didn’t put forward my views at all. But since you ask, I think marriage should be the domain of individual choice, not government mandate. So long as no-one is harmed, then people should be able to do whatever they damn well please, including marrying their own spouse.

    Many people would also take umbrage to the fact that you’re using paedophilia and buggery in the same breath as homosexuality, as though they are somehow morally comparative. Gay people don’t choose to be gay, their union harms nobody, and it is nobody’s business but their own.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    I’ll retract one of my last comments: that of marrying one’s own spouse. I’m with Robert, in that I think the government ought to stay out of people’s bedrooms, but I also think that they a duty to protect innocent people. The children of a union between brother and sister are likely to have birth defects, so I think the act should be illegal.

    But two consenting homosexual adults? Non of my business, or yours, Beavis. Vampires and werewolves? More power to them.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    The state has historically liked and supported marriage for one simple reason. Married people have babies and, at least theoretically, a more stable environment to raise productive human beings, Thus, it is an instrument it create more peasants, serfs, artisans, tax payers, productive individuals, etc. whatever you wanna call them. Thus, the state likes being in the marriage business because it literally increases the size of the state.

    Unmarried people also have babies. The only reason I can see for the state to have its mitts on the marriage process is to shape and manage the laws revolving around couples, including immigration, divorce, estates, custody etc. Would be much more messier if there was no legal definition of a married couple.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Two consenting adults is easy. What about three, four or five consenting adults? I’m not anthropologist, but I’d bet polygamy (especially if it involves one man and multiple wives) has been much more accepted and widely practiced than homosexual marriage. If homosexual marriage is to be permitted, surely, polygamous marriage should be permitted, too, no?

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    (I agree with you BTW)

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    ^ That was for wangkon936

    Two consenting adults is easy. What about three, four or five consenting adults? I’m not anthropologist, but I’d bet polygamy (especially if it involves one man and multiple wives) has been much more accepted and widely practiced than homosexual marriage. If homosexual marriage is to be permitted, surely, polygamous marriage should be permitted, too, no?

    Sure. Isn’t it already permitted in some states? So long as the women are not coerced or forced then I’m inclined to think that they be allowed to do what they want. I could be convinced otherwise though, I’m sure, particularly if it can be shown that such marriages have an adverse effect on kids.

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    Hoju_saram wrote:

    The children of a union between brother and sister are likely to have birth defects, so I think the act should be illegal.

    They could adopt, the same as two gay man or two lesbians could do.

    Anyway, since you are worried about birth defects, I assume you would also be against drug users marrying, a person with AIDS marrying, “little people” marrying, mentally challenged people marrying, and people with various other forms of faulty chromosomes marrying.

  • bumfromkorea

    Polygamy inevitably brings about either misogyny or misandry (depends on the ratio) and cannot compare to two consenting adults’ relationship.

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    Anyway, since you are worried about birth defects, I assume you would also be against drug users marrying, a person with AIDS marrying, “little people” marrying, mentally challenged people marrying, and people with various other forms of faulty chromosomes marrying.

    Three generations of imbeciles is enough.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Anyway, since you are worried about birth defects, I assume you would also be against drug users marrying, a person with AIDS marrying, “little people” marrying, mentally challenged people marrying, and people with various other forms of faulty chromosomes marrying.

    Ok, let’s let them marry but not copulate. I don’t fucking know.

    Just out of curiosity, what’s your position?

  • yuna

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2003/dec/03/germany

    All night I was thinking along the same lines. What’s wrong with eating human meat? What makes drugs (or cannabis in certain states) illegal but alcohol legal? Why stop assisted suicides? It’s all about choices and not forcing values down other people’s throats, no? In the end I thought these less about the principles themselves but all relative standards that each society has decided to impose and weighed by the (im)practicality of imposing the related laws and regulations in order to make sure that the laws are not misused or abused.

  • YangachiBastardo
  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    After much deliberation I’ve decided I disprove of drug-using, AIDs-carrying mentally-challenged polygamist homosexual little people peodophiles fucking their brothers. Still undecided on whether they can marry.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Yangachi, I’ve actually been to that funfair. He has a point.

  • YangachiBastardo

    Yangachi, I’ve actually been to that funfair. He has a point.

    Oh ! That must have been an experience !

    “I’m against marriage in general”

    M. Bloomberg, wise man

  • slim

    So after the funfair on the spot guidance, were some clowns and carnival barkers lined up and shot?

  • CactusMcHarris

    #166 Hojuman,

    Do we have a new deciding question on whether one’s a good human being or not? I know you like your dolphin (as I do, too) but I didn’t know there were many/any mentally-challenged polygamists in Korea? Here in Arizona, yes, there is more than the national average, but surely not TaeHan!

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    Hoju_saram wrote:

    Ok, let’s let them marry but not copulate. I don’t fucking know.

    So then you are not really for equal rights since you think some people have the right to copulate, but others do not.

    Hoju_saram wrote:

    Just out of curiosity, what’s your position?

    I do not have a problem with homosexuals marrying.

  • bibimbong
  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    I do not have a problem with homosexuals marrying.

    Me neither. What are we arguing about again?

  • hamel

    bibimbong: what an awful, reprehensible thing to say. I don’t like/agree with everything that YB says, but to invite a person to suicide, even jokingly, is going too far.

  • bibimbong

    @174 the comment was in reference to earlier comment in thread. and whose joking? yang said italy is a place where suicide is the only prospect for a significant percent of population.

  • bibimbong

    and the invitation has always been to join us here in our utopia and not to off himself in that post-apocalyptic hell that is milan… as i said he’d fit in here well.

  • bumfromkorea

    Jesus, YB wasn’t kidding… At all.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    bibimbong,

    That wasn’t very nice. An alternative to suicide is… immigration.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    As for me… I’m indifferent to gay marriage. Homosexuals can marry, I don’t have any problem with it, but at the same time I’m not going to pat myself on the back for being such an enlightened and wonderful individual just because I may support it like a lot of left-leaning heterosexuals are doing right now.

    It seems like to me with a black President and all, the Left has run out of touchstone social issues to get all energized about and has adopted gay marriage as the “it” issues to pour its emotional resources and efforts into. What else do they have? Legalization of marijuana? Doesn’t have the same emotional pull for the Left’s base.

    Having said that, gay marriage is still a very polarizing issue for a lot of Americans. Just because those Americans tend not to be part of the social and media elite doesn’t mean that their viewpoints don’t exist or their concerns are not real. Remember, gay marriage is officially illegal in 30 of the union’s 50 states.

    When media elites treat people who have these concerns as bigots and/or imbeciles they do a tremendous disservice to creating the unity that our country needs to fix its myriad of social, economic and policy problems.

    Jon Stewart’s arrogant and condescending attitude here:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/10/jon-stewart-slams-north-carolina-gay-marriage-ban-daily-show-video_n_1505878.html

    Does not help the increasing partisan splits that are politically paralyzing the country. It does not help to criticize tea partiers when certain members of the Left are equally mocking and sarcastic. I expect more from the Left, however, the only way they seem capable of responding is to constantly remind anyone who cares to listen how much more smarter and superior they are to everyone else.

  • jk6411

    Yay, let’s all turn gay.
    Then the human race will go extinct and we won’t have any more social problems any more.
    Maybe the liberals are smarter than everyone else..

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    #179,

    That is almost exactly how I feel, Wangkon. You said it very well.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    What about extraterrestrials? Should we be allowed to marry them? Or maybe eat them if they’re tasty? Or marry them and then eat them? Sort of like packing a lunch. Is marrying one’s lunch okay? If it’s a consenting adult, I mean?

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • YangachiBastardo

    Guys thanks for the defence but i think i figured what bibimbong was trying to convey.

    I think he meant to express a mix of surprise as i wasn’t totally bullshittin him together with some snark at my perception of Korea bein’ a vastly superior society.

    Also i act like a real jerk at times so i have to expect the due retribution. I do that cos i get extremely territorial over people who treat me well and so far Koreans did only good things to me (my disastrous second marriage included) so i really don’t like it when i perceive that people are pissing on Korea.

    I lost my financial advisory business last year due to spectacularly stupid decisions and i lost most of my assets. I got a good sales position with a Korean medical company. During my fat years i bought cash a nice apartment so we’re housed basically for free (there are no property taxes in my country). If shit really hits the fan i’ll sell the place quickly with a steep discount, rent some smaller place and start over, no big deal.

    I have way more than i need and i’m not worried at all about myself, i had way, way less when i was growing up.

    I’m worried about my son cos i raised him a little too comfy and i’m scared by the time he’s gonna reach his adulthood this country, which was a very good place til 10 years ago (thanks for the Euro, motherfuckers), will be a complete wasteland.

    And also did the day arrive i agreee on something with bevers: WK # 179 was excellent and wrap up my thoughts about this issue.

    So guys you have any timeline for gay marriage to be granted at Federal level ?

    You think Korea will implement some kind of civil union for gay people soon ?

    (i agree with creo when he says Koreans are completely indifferent to sexuality issues, God bless ‘em)

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    For instance . . . this extraterrestrial?

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • YangachiBastardo

    I do wonder which supposedly silly taboos we hold dear our children will be raging against when they grow up

    Our irresponsible living beyond our means and our silly notions of welfarism for which of course they’re expected to pay (with money they don’t have)

  • Q

    If your son get “marry” to a gay man, then would you call him a son-in-law or daughter-in-law? Maybe it depends.

  • Arghaeri

    Obama got 96% of the Black vote. I wonder how many Blacks, besides Samuel Jackson, voted for Obama because he was Black

    Very confusing, cos I heard the other 4% voted against him cos he’s white :-)

  • Arghaeri

    An alternative to suicide is… immigration.

    Why are immigrants gonna help you work out your debts?

    If you meant emigrate then where, when the rest if europe has no jobs either, and how you gonna pay for the family to fly to the land of golden promises.

  • bumfromkorea

    I’m extremely happy for my LGBT friends that Obama made that announcement, but for me personally this is going to really suck because I’m visiting my parents this weekend for two weeks… And they’re horribly homophobic while I’m very pro-gay marriage (and they know how I feel about the issue).

    Last time we had a “discussion”, my dad said if it was legal, he would start hunting “faggots” with his rifle while my mom told me that the Bible tells us to drag the “fags” to the town square and stone them to death.

    I hoped that maybe they wouldn’t hear about it (they don’t watch TV), but lo and behold, there it is on the local Korean newspaper. Front page…

    Yay…

  • bibimbong

    An alternative to suicide is… immigration.

    well, better this undiscovered country than the other.

    i don’t think the higher rates here have any affect on the expats til they’ve lived here for a while, then all bets are off.

  • αβγδε

    “Marriage” has two dimensions, as far as I’m concerned. 1) How it comes to be. (And all the romantic, existential, social ideals one might associate with marriage — as a life stage experienced by two individuals in a community of people, as event or ceremony, as a personal achievement.) And 2) What marriage is, after the fact, after the marriage ceremony, as a persistent state between people.

    A lot of people confuse moralizations and feelings they have about 1 with a poor understanding of what role the government should have in regard to 2.

    As far as 2 goes, for me anyway, marriage is a domestic partnership. It signifies a special commitment to a special lot of work that in particular relates to domestic affairs and, most of all, to one’s health. It’s like a mutal care-taking program. It may involve romance and love, ideally so, but not neccesarily. It may involve children, either by reproduction or otherwise, but not neccesarily. The marriage may have come to be by all the chivalrous series of events one might associate with romance and such romance may have involved a very pretty string of heroic moments involving the deepest caring; or it may have intense experiences of longing and desire and lust. Or it may have been an arranged marriage. Or a marriage of convenience. Or whatever. I have ideas as to what kind of such a life trajectory leading to marriage is best. We all have our ideals.

    My ideals, or your ideals, however, shouldn’t impinge on the fact that government has a role to play in acknowledging that such relationships or organizations or commitments exist and need to be identified as such. We can be abritrary and limit the number of persons to two individuals, if only for pragmatic legalistic reasons, and that would be fine. But that’s marriage: With respect to 2, it’s a domestic partnership acknowledged by law as such. Very easy to understand once it’s bee sorted out.

    I think Obama, wisely, tried keeping the matter of gay marriage on the issue of 2 above, as it can be seen 1 is too much subject to personal ideal and moralization, ideals cultivated by tradition and such — ideals, ultimately, that are merely personal and are seperable from the operation of what the governement should be in another respect. But that said I’m glad he’s not a Christian bumpkin.

  • YangachiBastardo

    bibimbong: admit that i was right ! :)

    (it wont hurt your mouth)

  • bibimbong

    ok! about what tho?

  • YangachiBastardo

    Korea being over a more livable country

  • bibimbong

    and we’re using suicides as criteria for livability?

  • CactusMcHarris

    Let me ask you ladies and gentlemen a question…..would you be able to, under normal circumstances, eat a meal while the ever-present smell of spilled sewage is present?

    We went to our usual Korean restaurant / fruit smoothie-like (they use powder) place a while back. We’d had good meals (man, like 12 panchan) and refreshment there before. However, it took about 11 seconds into the place to tell my party that we would not be eating there. The owner tried to get us to reconsider, but there was no way we were staying there, even for a refreshing glass of chilled boricha. I wanted to ask him in my most polite Korean (and I could, once upon a time, do the malkongdae with the best of them whitey Korean speakers), just how he could be open for business, how in anyone’s right mind would they sit down for a meal with such a omnipresent fecal stench, but I figured he was having a bad enough day.

  • CactusMcHarris

    And since I’m your humble reporter for Korean breaking windpower news, I’ve got this cheery bit of news for y’all

    _____quote______

    Vestas CEO Ditlev Engel says the South Korean market presents opportunities for the company’s offshore wind business and that it will work to build partnerships with companies in the region.

    “We see a lot of similarities between our two countries,” Engel says. “Both countries have clearly acknowledged that wind energy is a reliable and sustainable energy solution for the future.

    “In Denmark, the government has set a goal of achieving 50 percent of our electricity consumption from wind energy by 2020, and Korea is leading the way by systematically implementing policies required to spur green growth,” he continues. “With the right policy frameworks in place, business will make the investments, take the risks and create the new business opportunities that the green economic transformation promises.”

    Vestas already has a history and presence in South Korea. The company has installed more than 200 onshore wind power turbines in the country since 1998, and almost 70% of installed wind power plants in the country are currently using Vestas wind turbines.

    ________end quote___________

    Korea Blowing!

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    Let me ask you ladies and gentlemen a question…..would you be able to, under normal circumstances, eat a meal while the ever-present smell of spilled sewage is present?

    I thought you said you’ve been to Zoeckler Station.

  • http://paulhastings.com/ProfessionalDetail.aspx?ProfessionalId=113741 Ryan Russell

    It’s rare that I agree with Brendon 100% (given his proclivity to comment controversially on divissive issues – fun but not exactly consensus-building). But his “business of marriage” point at 143 is spot-on.

  • Anonymous_Joe

    #143 Brendon Carr: A larger question is whether the government ought to be in the marriage business in the first place — and if it’s a proper role for government, is it the place of the Federal government or of the states to regulate marriage?”

    I reread #143 because of the comment above and decided to toss in my 이벅 원.

    The legal capacity to consent criterion precludes marriage between adults and children, adults and sheep, and adults and other strawmen. The capacity to consent criterion does not eliminate polygamy in these slippery slope arguments.

    I too lean toward libertarianism and have an easy punt by questioning whether governments should even be in the marriage business. In a place that I like to call “reality”, however, marriage ain’t going away any time soon. The state has a need to perpetuate itself (which isn’t necessarily bad in all of its pursuits), and “I believe the children are our future/We should treat them well and let them lead the way/Show them all the beauty they possess inside/Give them a sense of pride….” Family units are how we get it done.

    The need for marriage is the bundle of rights that it creates in its partnership to further society’s goals. Some rights are easy. We all would agree (please no douche-baggery in your replies) that spouses should make decisions in absence of living wills and be beneficiaries for intestate deaths.

    Some rights are more difficult. Society has an overwhelming interest in the production of children. The way families divide labor in producing these goods for society is that one parent often sacrifices his or her career and earnings, which is the reasoning for the continued need of the spousal social security benefit. From here, you should be able to leap to the short answer: marriage should be regulated at the federal level because the federal government has the interest and bears the financial burden.

    (BTW, I have no problem with further restricting marriage so that children are a necessary condition for the license or that the license automatically and necessarily expires after some to be determined number of years without producing children.)

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  • CactusMcHarris

    #198,

    Yes, but being hungover counteracts the fetid vapours.

  • YangachiBastardo

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-05-11/facebook-co-founder-saverin-gives-up-u-s-citizenship-before-ipo.html

    How you say “i’m envious” in Hokkien ?

    PS

    Great post there @ 197 Cactus

  • YangachiBastardo
  • CactusMcHarris

    Lest it be said that windpower news with the ROK is my sole contribution here, I bring you caviar. You have to supply the weekend in Vegas (hookers, cognac and coke optional).

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/12/business/global/catering-to-caviar-tastes-from-an-unexpected-place.html?_r=1&nl=afternoonupdate&emc=edit_au_20120511

  • Banana Stache

    One does not need to be married in order to produce children.

    As for wars on marriage and its defence thereof, the only two things that to my knowledge can end a marriage is divorce or death. Thus, the first step to protecting marriage would be the criminalization of both divorce and death (while married- the death of single people would still be legal).

  • Q

    A society of growing number of gay family would need more immigration and adoption to sustain the society. Otherwise, octomoms!

  • Banana Stache

    The number of homosexual couples (married or not) would not affect the population growth as long as the number of reproducing Heterosexual couples remained the same.

  • Q

    Wouldn’t it better this baby be adopted?

  • jk6411

    You have to wonder: after gay marriage, what will be next?
    I think polygamy will be next.
    (Why shouldn’t they be allowed to marry? If they all love each other?)
    And then they will allow grown men to marry teenage girls. (Because, as we all know, girls are growing up really fast these days. And they should be allowed to marry at an earlier age.)
    Next, they will allow members of a family to marry each other, as long as the male has a vasectomy so that they will never have a child together.

    And so on and so forth..