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Open Thread #237

Play nice, children.

And have a great weekend.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • Seth Gecko

    First, bro!
    (With the Seth Gecko out-of-moderation sneak attack!)

  • dogbertt

    Foist!

  • Seth Gecko

    You know what I haven’t seen in a LONG time? A breathalyzer police stop. My wife says it’s because it’s election season, but I swear it’s been more than a year. And I drive ALL the time!

  • Seth Gecko

    Gotcha dogbertt!
    :)

  • CactusMcHarris

    And I don’t get a HT for letting dogbertt know it was an open thread – I am so Second, Bro.

  • http://www.davidswills.com David S. Wills

    http://www.ministryoftofu.com/2012/04/photos-chinese-fishermen-trpped-in-the-sea-with-no-fishab/

    A view of the Chinese fishermen issue (or maybe not the issue, but at least the people) from the other side of the East China Sea. Replete with some wonderful photos. Reminds us that not all Chinese fishermen of of the murderous sort.

  • Railwaycharm

    Get a room

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Foist!

    I think, it’s the first time that word has been said on this blog…

    - to pass off as genuine, valuable, or worthy

    - to impose (something or someone unwanted) upon another by coercion or trickery

    - to introduce or insert surreptitiously or without warrant

    - to force another to accept especially by stealth or deceit

    - to pass off as genuine or worthy

    - to insert fraudulently or deceitfully

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    LA JONQUERA, Spain – She had expected a job in a hotel. But when Valentina arrived here two months ago from Romania, the man who helped her get here – a man she had considered her boyfriend – made it clear that the job was on the side of the road.

    He threatened to beat her and to kill her children if she did not comply. And so she stood near a roundabout recently, her hair in a greasy ponytail, charging $40 for intercourse, $27 for oral sex.

    “For me, life is finished,” she said later that evening, tears running down her face. “I will never forget that I have done this.”

    La Jonquera used to be a quiet border town where truckers rested and the French came looking for a deal on hand-painted pottery and leather goods. But these days, prostitution is big business here, as it is elsewhere in Spain, where it is essentially legal.

    While the rest of Spain’s economy may be struggling, experts say that prostitution – almost all of it involving the ruthless trafficking of foreign women – is booming, exploding into public view in small towns and big cities. The police recently rescued a 19-year-old Romanian woman from traffickers who had tattooed on her wrist a bar code and the amount she still owed them: more than $2,500.

    In the past, most customers were middle-aged men. But the boom here, experts say, is powered in large part by the desires of young men – many of them traveling in packs for the weekend – taking advantage of Europe’s cheap and nearly seamless travel.

    “The young used to go to discos,” said Francina Vila i Valls, Barcelona’s councilor for women and civil rights. “But now they go to brothels. It’s just another form of entertainment to them.”

    There is little reliable data on the subject. The State Department’s 2010 report on trafficking said that 200,000 to 400,000 women worked in prostitution in Spain. The report said that 90 percent were trafficked.

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    the above is from the nyt. i guess it puts cold water on the yahoo driven idea that only korean men traffic women and use prostitutes. btw, soon ill post a link on the american male and his love for porn. that btw is growing by leaps and bounds. the white man is becoming like the asian one. lol.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    “soon ill post a link on the american male and his love for porn.”

    Maybe rename this thread “Open Threat” . . .

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • keith

    ^ I don’t think I’ve ever read that (sic) ‘only korean men traffic women and use prostitutes.’ Either here on this site or anywhere else. That would be a terribly ignorant thing to write. The sex trade does seem to be a large part of Korea’s economy, but prostitution and human trafficking is not a uniquely Korean issue by any means. I wish Pawi wouldn’t try and ‘foist’ his ridiculous, and frankly racist nonsense upon the innocent readers of the blog.

    http://koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/special/2012/04/182_108524.html

    ‘A poll at tourism promotion Website(www.visitkorea.or.kr), conducted by the state-run Korea Tourism Organization’s Paris branch, displayed that more than 90 percent of 3,775 respondents said they want to visit Korea. Of them, 75.8 percent said they will come to Korea without fail.

    The result tells that hallyu has been promoting the Korean tourism industry directly or indirectly.

    According to the poll, most respondents preferred hallyu theme tour packages, which include K-pop concerts and drama-related tourist attractions. In a selection of two or more purposes of visiting Korea, the general sightseeing tour was the largest with 96 percent, followed by the tour with K-pop concert by 80 percent and that with drama shooting site by 41.2 percent. The tour for study was the lowest 34.2 percent.’

    A silly poll as anyone who looks at a government ran tourist website and bother to complete an online poll will probably be interested in visiting that country, otherwise why would they look at it in the first place? If they conducted a real poll they’d probably get the result that 99.999% of French folks have no fucking idea about what a ‘Hallyu’ is.

    Maybe the French Hallyu fans really want to visit for the whores rather than the tours?

    _____

    Does anyone know what happened on the green line yesterday morning? I was travelling during rush hour and everyone got booted off at City Hall, I had to walk all the way to Euljiro 3 ga station to get on a different line, usually the Seoul subway system is very efficient so I guess something pretty major must have happened. I was a bit annoyed as I had to reschedule an appointment as it made me very late.

    I also helped two different groups of tourist types get to their destinations (which made me even later!), both groups asked me as they were unable to speak Korean and couldn’t find a Korean who spoke English to help them! How is it that those Indonesian and Arabic tourist folk I met were fluent in English, whilst most Koreans spend decades studying English and are still really bad at it? It least Koreans incompetence in English keeps English teachers in jobs!

    The Indonesian man and his wife who I helped was really suprised that nobody he asked for help (subway workers) could speak English until he bumped into me. A quote from him ‘It’s quite difficult to get around Seoul, nobody speaks English here!’ Maybe they didn’t help him because he was a ‘dirty dark-skinned foreigner terrorist type?’ being Indonesian and all.

    Those non native English speaking foreign tourists I helped out yesterday spoke better English than most Korean English teachers can. ‘Tourist hub’ my arse! If non native speakers of English from developing countries are complaining and frustrated about Koreans’ general lack of ability in English, then they should give up on any ‘tourist hub’ plans.

    Anyway it’s a beautiful day, I’m off out on the bike for a little ride.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    I don’t think I’ve ever read that (sic) ‘only korean men traffic women and use prostitutes.

    It’s just stonehead keeping his victimization complex tuned up; never mind.

  • Creo69

    “Those non native English speaking foreign tourists I helped out yesterday spoke better English than most Korean English teachers can.”

    In my opinion, Korean teachers entering education are becoming better and better each year. I say congratulations!

  • Iang nio

    #8 “99.999% of French folks have no fucking idea about what a ‘Hallyu’ is.”

    Keith, with all due respect, I object… One, ‘Corée Voyage’ promotes Hallyu big time (yes, they are bilingual and have their office in Seoul and also work with the French Tourist office and the Korean Embassy in France). Besides they work with ‘G.O.A’L. (http://www.goal.or.kr/eng/) the organisation I came over with to Korea last year (first time since I left) as well as another Korean adoptee organisation in France and just in Paris, there are over 10,000 Korean adoptees – that is not counting the rest of France.

    KBS has recently established a French channel. The French speaking part of Belgium also is connected and works with Corée Voyage.

    The French Korean community is quite big… so …

    #8 “A quote from him ‘It’s quite difficult to get around Seoul, nobody speaks English here!’ Maybe they didn’t help him because he was a ‘dirty dark-skinned foreigner terrorist type?’ being Indonesian and all.”

    No, again, I desist… As a Korean adoptee, I had the same experience, except that they thought I’m Japanese (the horror! – just kidding – but only sort of…).

    Travelling through Korea on my own and not speaking Korean was interesting, to say the least. I managed because I can write and read Hangul (not fluently, of course, but it got me where I needed to as and how and I was lucky in ‘attracting’ the right people that were able to help me – sometimes even without being able to ‘talk’ to each other) but ‘communication’ was still tricky…. And I DO look Korean, you know? I haven’t ‘turned white’ even after having lived in Europe and the US/UK for most of my life…

    So it has nothing to do with being dark-skinned… It’s just that Korea by and large is a mono-lingual country.

  • Iang nio

    For those that speak or can read French…here’s the “proof in the pudding” that ‘Hallyu’ is indeed making its headway into French ‘consciousness’…

    http://www.hallyu.fr/?news_tag=france

    À propos de Hallyu France:

    Hallyu.fr est un site traitant de l’actualité musicale et visuelle moderne de la Corée du Sud.

    Notre but: vous apporter au quotidien une information compréhensible sur cette vague culturelle, autant pour les experts que les néophytes dans le domaine!

    They’re also on FB.

    http://www.coreevoyage.com/

    The first thing they offer are ‘Hallyu’ tours…

  • keith

    @11, fair enough. I still though it was funny that I could do such a good job of giving perfect travel instructions to those people and they could get exactly where they wanted to go. Even Koreans were lost and confused with the green line going out of service, as a Seoul resident (and the fact the metro is very good) you just assume it always works. When it doesn’t it causes chaos, as I saw yesterday. Chaos that ‘people in the know’ can handle, but a tourist certainly can’t. Even many Koreans were very confused about how to get where they wanted to go when the line went down.

    I just got back from the bike ride and it was a lovely day, it was also nice to see some of the very nice improvements that the city is making in developing the riverside as an area for leisure. Nice to see lots of people out and about messing around in boats too.

    The only negative thing that entered my mind was ‘why put up ugly signs saying you can only ride at 20kph!’ Only old people and children cycle that slowly! Fortunately in proper Korean style most people were disobeying the sign and doing between 25 and 30 kph, unless they were old, really unfit, or had a shitty bicycle.

    Dinner tonight is going to be epic! Lamb chops with garlic and herbs, nice veggies, home made mint sauce, roast potatoes and red wine reduction glaze! I’m not a christian, but I like eating lamb at easter time – scratch that. I like eating lamb at any time! The people who proclaim ‘I don’t like lamb!’ don’t know what they’re missing.

  • Iang nio

    #13 “Even Koreans were lost and confused with the green line going out of service, as a Seoul resident (and the fact the metro is very good) you just assume it always works. When it doesn’t it causes chaos, as I saw yesterday. Chaos that ‘people in the know’ can handle, but a tourist certainly can’t. Even many Koreans were very confused about how to get where they wanted to go when the line went down.”

    Guess what, that happened to me as well. It reminded me of good ole Blighty, where every summer, they have a tube strike (like clockwork) in London . I wasn’t happy but I still managed – it’s all in a day’s travelling!

    One should NEVER ever take things for granted.

    Including metro services or that people speak English. Only an Anglophile would have that ‘self-understanding’. Which I why was much better prepared to go off on my own – as a woman, no less. French came in handy too, at some stage – although German is never heard in Korea (not as far as I could tell).

    Other than that, you DO like your English food, don’t you? I just can’t get over this ‘mint’ thing in a sauce… shudder…

    Still, ‘bon appétit’ as they say! :)

  • Seth Gecko

    I think that if anyone has to offer “proof” of how popular something is, it means it’s NOT popular.

    Koreans singing silly English lyrics to ripped-off/cloned American beats… that’s what K-pop has to offer??

    Oh! They hired Teddy Riley and Will.i.am! So.. is it still “Korean”?

    It is PURE 100% trash. I wish a Korean rapper would say “fuck it” and just rip into the K-pop bands EMINEM-style.

  • keith

    @18 – Mint sauce is lovely with lamb.

    Some dried mint, a little apple vinegar, a little sugar and salt, a few drops of water, a bit of a mix and a little time = lovely . Lamb chops cooked medium-rare and some roast potatoes ( + other veg) with herbs and gravy is heaven on a plate.

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    A lot of Indian food uses mint to good effect, including that lovely mint-coriander chutney. Give mint a chance!

  • cm

    #12 “‘Tourist hub’ my arse!”

    keith, you would do well to take up your own general good advice given to pawi, that he shouldn’t read into something that isn’t there. Nowhere in that article says Korea is a “hub of tourism”, and your racism complaint about Koreans not helping Indonesian man and his wife is also presumption, considering that, that’s not what they said.

    And I disagree with you completely, Koreans don’t need to be experts at English to live in their own country. That sounds so arrogant, if you don’t mind me saying so. Then how good are your Korean? I often hear that Korean is a useless language, nobody need to learn it.

  • cm

    “It’s just that Korea by and large is a mono-lingual country.”

    I find it simply ludicrous to complain about lack of English, when Korean subways beat anything that London can offer in terms of language services for its visitors. You don’t need to speak Korean to live in Seoul – a testimonial to how accommodating Koreans are toward English speakers. Do London subway offer Korean, Japanese, Chinese, and English language services, including train station signs and ticketing machines in those languages? If not, why not?

  • PineForest

    I know this has nothing to do with Korea, but I thought I’d share…

    I’m not much of a car guy, but I saw a car last night that amazed me. A brother of a friend bought a 1963 Chrysler LeBaron Imperial. Glacier Blue. Amazing condition. Original engine, with only about 54,000 original miles. Original interior upholstery, about 18 feet long, 4 inch white wall tires, push button tranny, and my favorite feature, an early cruise control unit that you manually set under the hood to one of nine settings… 55 mph, 60 mph, whatever you set it to.. that’s the only cruise control setting. You then pull a knob while driving, kinda like an old choke .. and then it runs at that speed. The doors were like 12 inches wide!! Just an amazing vehicle. Oh, and the steering wheel was oblong.

  • dogbertt

    It wasn’t that long ago people were complaining about not being able to buy lamb in Korea — things must have changed.

    I myself once called the head of Costco Korea to complain about them dropping lamb from their meat roster.

  • Creo69

    “You don’t need to speak Korean to live in Seoul – a testimonial to how accommodating Koreans are toward English speakers.”

    True indeed!

  • Iang nio

    #19 Seth, just because something is ‘there’ doesn’t mean I like it…

    I’m not into K-pop. My point with the whole ‘Hallyu’ thing was that it is a catalyst for Frenchies to visit Korea – is all.

    #20 & #21 I just don’t like the “mint with meat” idea. And I don’t particularly like Indian food – the clarified butter upsets my stomach and I find the flavours – even though it’s hot as well, not very harmonious… It’s about nuances. But then again, everybody’s palate and taste buds are different. It’s a matter of preference and what you grew up with as a child…

    I was thinking ‘roast potatoes’ Keith before you mentioned them… :)

    #23 cm what makes you think I was complaining? I wasn’t the one being ‘stuck’ with having to ask a ‘foreigner’ for directions… Besides, I grew up in a country where the curriculum entails three (foreign) languages as part of ‘normal’ education, none of which are the local tongue.

    The interesting thing was that I met a Korean in Seoul who was complaining about Italians not being able to speak English. And he hated the food in Europe so much (or rather, missed Korean food), he booked his return flight a day early (I’m not making this up).

    I’ve been to the Amazon and I did not expect people in the Amazon to speak English. I got by with my little Spanish.

    Don’t get flustered over me. I managed and I found it interesting if sometimes frustrating but I was more annoyed with myself than with the locals (not being able to speak the language of my birth country) – and unlike most tourists, I didn’t just hang around in Seoul (went to Cheonju, Kwangju, Mokpo, Jeju and Busan), AND I used the four means of public transport that are common in Korea (bus, train, boat/ferry and plane).

    You’re barking up the wrong tree.

    Dear Uncle Marmot

    It seems the kids aren’t playing nice today…oh well… cut them some slack… :)

  • DLBarch

    Don’t know if anyone else got up early to watch Cambridge out-row Oxford, if that’s what you can call it, but holy crap! That was one hell of peculiar set of circumstances! (Thank you, BBC America!)

    What’s this got to do with Korea? Absolutely nothing, except that watching that race in my hotel room this morning made me think that I’ve never seen much coverage of crew in Korea by any of the country’s soft porn, er, sports newspapers, and am curious whether any of Seoul’s universities have a rowing rivalry.

    And, no, YonKo-jeon doesn’t count ’cause crew is not one of the five contested sports.

    DLB

  • Iang nio

    cm, for clarification’s sake I’m not English or French. And in my adoptive country our public transport also has four languages on the street signs.

    So, I’m not that overly ‘floored’ by your claim. But they’re of course European languages, not Asian.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    cm,

    I think Korean road signs and maps have a lot of English in them because we don’t want the U.S. VII Corps to get lost while driving to the front line just in case NK attacks. In terms of making a major city like Seoul English friendly is probably related to the fact that the Korean economy is an export dependent economy.

  • Sonagi

    Do London subway offer Korean, Japanese, Chinese, and English language services, including train station signs and ticketing machines in those languages? If not, why not?

    I’ve never ridden the Tube, but I’d expect the signage and services to be in English at least. In fact, the ticketing machines give instructions in 17 languages: English, French, German, Italian, Japanese Spanish, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Greek, Gujarati, Hindi, Polish, Punjabi, Tamil, Turkish and Urdu. Japanese and Chinese are included, but oops, no Korean, just nearly extinct languages like Arabic, Spanish, and Hindi.

  • Sonagi

    And I’d expect a fair number of transportation service employees to be bilingual immigrants or children of immigrants, just like airport and train station employees in the US and Canada.

  • Iang nio

    Completely out of left field, but this one cracked me up:

    MegaMillions lottery ‘winner’: I think I lost the ticket

    The McDonald’s worker who claims she scooped last week’s world record lottery prize is now saying she has lost the winning ticket. Her co-workers at the fast food restaurant in Baltimore, Maryland, fear Haitian immigrant Mirlande Wilson is hiding the ticket to avoid paying what they insist is their share of the more than $100 million (£63 million) prize.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/9191098/MegaMillions-lottery-winner-I-think-I-lost-the-ticket.html

    And I’m the Easter Bunny… Nyack, nyack…heh, heh…

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Looks like the Jewish [sarcasm on] worldwide conspiracy’s [sarcasm off] master plan for Korea:

    http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Columnists/Article.aspx?id=264852

  • gbnhj

    DLBarch, the answer to your question is a qualified yes (or, if you like, a qualified no ;) ). Many schools have ‘indoor’ clubs – the competition’s in the gym, on rowing machines. I don’t know of any official school teams, and there are no great school rivalries in rowing, but many unis have such clubs and they compete annually.

  • cm

    #36 Wangkon936, read the amusing comments below that editorial.

    “they eat dogs over there, do we really want to be friends with them?”

    “it’s forbidden to teach the Talmut to non-jews”.

    “Christians trying to fool Jews”.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Thanks for the link IangNio – [they work with ‘G.O.A’L. (http://www.goal.or.kr/eng/) the organisation I came over with ]

    some interesting reading in there -

    “If you want a little girl, you adopt from China,” Stacey explained. “If you want a boy, you adopt from Korea. If you want an older child, you adopt from Russia.”

    http://www.goal.or.kr/eng/?slms=room&lsms=2&sl=6&ls=6&query=view&uid=237

  • RolyPoly

    “Men shall live for ever more because of Easter day”

    Yes, forks, Jesus provided a way for men to live forever! He proved it by his own resurrection.

    Believe it. Men shall live in His kingdom after they die and disappear from this planet.

    This is the Goood News (Gospel) of Jesus Christ!

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    “it’s forbidden to teach the Talmut to non-jews”.

    Sun Myung Moon states “In elementary school we were taught the Myungshimbogam. This was something that was no less than that of the Bible. I had memorized it all but I’ve forgotten it now. After studying theology I did not quote from Confucian teachings ever again”.

    http://www.tparents.org/moon-talks/sunmyungmoon08/SunMyungMoon-080413.htm

    It seems the Myungshimbogam (Koreas Talmut) is the Cunfucian bible.

    http://www.dbpia.co.kr/view/ar_view.asp?arid=823894

  • Arghaeri

    Yes, forks, Jesus provided a way for men to live forever!

    Yet another example of Baduk’s blatant discrimination. Despite centuries of harmious coexistence together with forks he blatantly disregards and ignores knives.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Believe it. Men shall live in His kingdom after they die and disappear from this planet.

    total discrimination against spoons and women also.

  • Creo69

    “Believe it. Men shall live in His kingdom after they die and disappear from this planet.”

    Another year “com’ith and gon’ith” and our good (oh!) lordy has yet to return…the after life is so unfair.

    Happy Easter Mr. Easter Bunny!

  • keith

    Seoul’s subway system is wonderful. Without it getting around the city would be an absolute nightmare. I don’t think everyone in Korea needs to learn English, but the educational authorities do, and so do many parents. London’s tube is awful and very expensive, the olympic games this year I predict will be a fiasco regarding the logistics of getting everyone around the city to the different venues. The Tube is the oldest subway system in the world, and it seems they’ve done little to improve it since it was first built!

    I do speak Korean a bit. I’m not fluent, but I can get by just fine. My comprehension and listening skills in Korean are far better than my speaking skills, though my pronunciation has been complemented by Koreans many times. I put that down to the fact that I’m a keen musician and musicians often have very good listening skills.

    I’ve never complained about Koreans’ English skills, I’m just mystified that so many spend so much time trying to learn English and with a few notable exceptions suck at using it. I have a few students who are so good at English that I sometimes think ‘your English is great, you don’t need me!’ I also have students who have been studying for years, but can’t even answer basic questions like ‘how’s the weather?’ or ‘what did you do last weekend?’ I did think it was funny though that someone from Indonesia would complain about not being able to find a Korean to help them who spoke English.

    Lamb is much more widely available than in the past, it used to be a rarity. I usually buy mine in one of the many international stores in Itaewon. When I was shopping the other day I found leg, shoulder, French cut ribs, ribs and shanks! Wonderful, though unfortunately all frozen. Frozen is OK, but fresh is much better. The selections of herbs and spices is also much better than it used to be. Food shopping in Korea has become a lot easier these days. Man can not live on gochujang alone.

    You also don’t need to use ghee or clarified butter when cooking Indian food, a great many Indian or Pakistani style dishes can work just as well with regular vegetable or groundnut oil. The only oil you really shouldn’t ever use in preparing Indian food is olive oil, it has too strong a taste and burns at a fairly low temperature.

    Regarding the Oxford vs. Cambridge boat race, did you see the footage of the guy who was swimming in the Thames, he almost got brained by an oar! Those students can row really fast and the idiot could easily have got himself drowned.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    No one has noted the exclusion of chopsticks from eternal life! What does that say about all of you?

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Lamb is much more widely available than in the past, it used to be a rarity.

    Lamb and brown rice were common Korean meals, until about 60 years ago.

  • keith

    @ 45, I’ve heard that too. My personal experience in Korea only goes back a decade. Why did eating such a wonderful product die out. If cooked properly, lamb in my opinion is the best meat there is. I haven’t even seen any sheep in Korea except for at the zoo! When I saw some sheep at the zoo I was just as as suprised as when I visited my parents a while ago and a neighbouring farmer had some alpaca on his fields. Alpaca wool is quite valuable stuff, and they’re very cool and exotic animals to see grazing in the Oxfordshire countryside.

  • jkitchstk

    # 12,
    “Does anyone know what happened on the green line yesterday morning?”
    I do…,
    “Wind Shuts Down Major Subway”
    http://koreajoongangdaily.joinsmsn.com/news/article/article.aspx?aid=2951114&cloc=joongangdaily|home|top

  • jkitchstk

    On a more tragic note, I thought everything in Korea was bali bali?
    The next time a drunk Ajjossi collides with you on the sidewalk, be sure to say “I’m sorry” or he could go Jeffrey Dahmer on you,
    “Police can’t save woman after she calls with location
    Victim is found murdered 13 hours after phoning officers with specifics
    20대女 살해범, 문부수고 들오는 순간 112는…”
    http://koreajoongangdaily.joinsmsn.com/news/article/Article.aspx?aid=2951112
    The excuse,
    “We also were afraid of turning on our sirens because they could agitate the suspect.”
    Doesn’t the police and 119 emergency in Korea release emergency call recordings? Suppose we just have to believe that this is how the call went,
    Victim: Please help me. I’m being raped by a stranger. It is the attacker’s house located between the Motgol public playground and Jidong Elementary School.
    Police: You mean the school in Ji-dong in Paldal District?
    Victim: Yes. Please hurry.
    Police: Let us trace your location through your mobile.

    Police: Are you really saying that you’re being raped?
    Victim: Yes, the attacker just went out of the house temporarily and I locked the door of a room and am making this call.

    Police: Can you give us more details about the location again?
    Victim: A house between the school and the playground. Please hurry please.
    Police: Do you know who he is?
    Victim: No.
    (Sound of door breaking)

    Victim: Please sir, I’m sorry, I’m sorry.
    Police: Hello? Please give us the address one more time. Hello?
    -Call terminated
    “The police said the length of the communication was a minute and 50 seconds, and the caller stayed on the line for two more minutes before the call was lost. The police dispatcher is also under fire for asking the wrong questions and wasting time.”

  • Arghaeri

    You are right Jeffery, on behalf of chopsticks everywhere I offer my heartfelt hope that thay also receive redemption.

  • RolyPoly

    Happy Easter, everyone.

    Too many English teachers here.

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    I’ll say.

  • Seth Gecko

    Me too.

  • Creo69

    “Too many English teachers here.”

    Yeh… and too many damn Chinese in China!

    Like this blog would even exist without English teachers. For Christ sake (again, Happy Birthday Mr. Easter Bunny) this blog was started by a former English teacher. Who knew?

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Don’t worry, a lot of them should be leaving in September, once Seoul Ministry Office of Education gets rid of 70% of the Seoul Public school teachers in August.

    # 9 & #10 – Pawi – left out the most interesting part of his “prostitutes story”

    here in the most interesting part

    [ Until recently, for instance, the police in Barcelona did not even realise Chinese mafias ran prostitution rings in the city. Then they began noticing more and more advertisements for Chinese, Japanese and Korean women - all of them, it turned out, Chinese - working in a network of about 30 brothels. ]

    http://dok.do/s8tipE

  • Creo69

    “I’ll say.”

    Don’t you and your uhh…”associates” have some weed to score or something?

  • Creo69

    “Don’t worry, a lot of them should be leaving in September, once Seoul Ministry Office of Education gets rid of 70% of the Seoul Public school teachers in August.”

    Leaving? Care to make a little wager? I’ll take odds that post September (give things about 3 months to get up to speed again) you will be seeing the total number of English teachers in Korea rising.

  • Arghaeri

    Too many English teachers here.

    You’re in Northern America, what do you expect, a surfeit of Swahili teachers :-)

  • jkitchstk

    Is English teacher talk to increase hits and comments? As we see more lawyers invade S. Korea we’ll likely see more titles like “International lawyers busted for drugs!” Followed by articles that say “A second-generation Korean-American, he and his fellow American lawyer, a Mr. Eom, also stand accused of dealing pot to other gyopo and foreigners in Korea.”

    So we’ll likely be seeing more lawyer specific talk in the future. Lawyers make more money than teachers no? Well then they’d probably fall into the upper class society but only in terms of money, not ethics.
    http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2012/02/shame-on-the-rich.html?ref=hp
    New research shows the rich commit more crimes *
    “The team’s findings suggest that privilege promotes dishonesty. For example, upper-class subjects were more likely to cheat.”

    “Observers coded the status of the cars’ drivers based on the vehicles’ age, make, and appearance. Drivers of shiny, expensive cars were three times more likely than those of old clunkers to plow through a crosswalk, failing to yield to pedestrians as required by California state law. High-status motorists were also four times more likely than those with cheaper, older cars to cut off other drivers at a four-way stop.”

    And so hypocritical too*
    “It’s a great study,” says sociologist Adam Galinsky of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, who has shown that those with power are more apt to condemn behavior that they themselves engage in.”

  • Arghaeri

    All that seems to indicate is that they can afford to pay the traffic tickets, and repairs, whereas those in the clunkers can’t.

  • Arghaeri

    I believe there were experiments somewhere to make fines for minor offences proportional to offenders free income rather than small fixed amounts, exactly to rarget this phenomena and make the fines a true discincentive to commit minor offences. Although I also understand this wasn’t followed up due to the adminstrative burden.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Leaving? Care to make a little wager? I’ll take odds that post September (give things about 3 months to get up to speed again) you will be seeing the total number of English teachers in Korea rising.

    With 2,000 Foreign English teachers getting laid off by S.M.O.E. in September, among the group of foreigners who stay and compete for Hagwon jobs, Hagwons will be able to offer lower salaries. Stay in Korea, work for a Hagwon on a lower salary? – I will take you up on that wager.

    Drivers of shiny, expensive cars were three times more likely than those of old clunkers to plow through a crosswalk, failing to yield to pedestrians

    I see that everyday in Seoul, Equus drivers think they own the road and that red lights don’t apply to them.

  • Arghaeri

    OK, not just experiments, well established in some juridictions….

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day-fine#section_1

  • Arghaeri

    Equus ‘drivers’ are frequently professional drivers (chauffers) as opposed to normal car user’s and tend to operate as such much like the taxi and bus driver’s.

  • Creo69

    “With 2,000 Foreign English teachers getting laid off by S.M.O.E. in September, among the group of foreigners who stay and compete for Hagwon jobs, Hagwons will be able to offer lower salaries. Stay in Korea, work for a Hagwon on a lower salary? – I will take you up on that wager.”

    I guess if you are simple minded enough to exclude increased demand for private education which will result from the elimination of native English instructors in the public education system you could be right. I can’t imagine how anyone could try to create an argument that doesn’t consider this factor however.

    Right now the average native speaker in the public school system teaches an average class of 25 students (probably on the low side). Many of the NET’s only see these students once or twice per week.

    Most hawgwan classes average about 10 to 15 students per class and students attend on average 3 times per week. Of course not all students in the public school system will go private just because the NETs are gone…but this is Korea and we all know how important it is to keep up with the Kims.

    Increased demand…smaller class sizes…greater frequency of attendance. This “fighting” over existing hagwan jobs you envision is a pipe dream of your own imagination. The fact that you didn’t even consider something as basic as increase in demand (again, refer to any news source or ask any random Korean walking down the street) shows your mouth is far ahead of any reasonable understanding of the issue.

  • jkitchstk

    Greed is another deadly sin the upper-class commits more than the poor or lower class(see # 57 link above)*
    “Studies involving money games show that upper-class subjects keep more for themselves, and U.S. surveys find that the rich give a smaller percentage of their income to charity than do the poor.”

    It sounds like the upper-class and Koreans are similar*
    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2010/08/21/2010082100224.html
    “At the same time it is still in its infant stage when it comes to international aid donations, ranking 19th out of 25 countries in international donations in 2010, according to the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.”

  • Jashin Densetsu

    INTERVIEW
    Revisiting the science behind 9/11
    Apr 6, 2012

    http://atimes.com/atimes/Global_Economy/ND06Dj02.html

    Even as the blood-stained dust of the World Trade Center was still smoking, the events were triggering one of history’s most enduring “whodunit” mysteries. In this interview with Asia Times Online contributor Victor Fic, Australian scientist Frank Legge indicts the United States. A second, future interview will present other perspectives.

    After graduating with a PhD in chemistry in 1983, Legge worked as a research officer for the Australian Department of Agriculture for a number of years. Since the September 11, 2001, attacks he has written articles such as “9/11 – Acceleration Study Proves Explosive Demolition” and “The Pentagon Attack on 9/11: A Refutation of the Flyover Hypothesis Based on Analysis of the Flight Path”.

  • Iang nio

    #37 YotD

    ‘Exporting’ children to some 15 countries worldwide (with over 100,000 in the US alone), is big business… Holt, which was started by an American Christian fundamentalist (…) who was slightly deluded in thinking he was on a mission from God to ‘save’ Korean orphans after the Korean war, made Korea the first Asian country ever to open its floodgates (literally) for int’l adoption and still ‘exports’ unwanted offspring abroad to this day.

    Contrary to the excerpt you mention, the majority of adoptees (back in my day anyway) were girls. Of course…!

    Girls always in Asian countries are always being considered ‘less than’ – some 90% of the adoptees at the beginning were girls. I find it astounding that the only Asian nation that does NOT sell its children to the wealthy so-called ‘first world’ nations (because, let’s put it straight – it is an ‘income producing’ venture…), are the Japanese. I’ve never met a Japanese adoptee in all the places I’ve been to, lived at or visited.

    The following video is in Korean with English subtitles and has aptly been titled “Baby-exporting Nation”. By Korean standards, it’s quite ‘revolutionary’ to even have it be addressed in that fashion (no holds barred).

    Baby Exporting Nation: The Two Faces of Inter-Country Adoption
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4439761050204972345

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    “Everything you know is wrong” — JD channels Firesign Theatre!

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • Iang nio

    And now (for those that are faithful ‘believers’, don’t watch this) … drum roll please for one of the true and best stand-up comedians to ever have graced this planet and who unfortunately left us much too early…

    George Carlin on religion
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeSSwKffj9o

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    He’s good on cars, too, ’cause he also doesn’t believe in traffic laws either: Traffic Accidents: Keep Movin’.

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • Iang nio

    Jeff, he would’ve felt VERY comfortable in Seoul, don’t ya think? :)

  • Creo69

    “Don’t worry, a lot of them should be leaving in September, once Seoul Ministry Office of Education gets rid of 70% of the Seoul Public school teachers in August.”

    And, now that we have established that you don’t know diddly about supply and demand or basic economics in general let’s look at who and what we will have to thank for the increase of English instructors country wide in South Korea you will be seeing in the not so far future.

    As per usual, you will be able to thank the Korean media. Once the NETs are gone in Seoul parents will once again turn to private education. The Korean media will do what they do best and stir up a nation wide frenzy where none exists.

    They will carry on and on and on and on about the advantage that students in Seoul once again have as they have access to NETs through private education. They will talk about the smaller class sizes at private language institutes and the fact that students at these academies have more contact with native speakers than students in the provinces who may still have some contact with a NET at their public school.

    We all know what comes next. Parents outside of Seoul are not going to stand for having their children be at a disadvantage to the students in Seoul and new language institutes will be sprouting like weeds country wide. No surprises here if you take the time to think it through a bit.

  • R. Elgin

    Per “Pawi’s” observations, the man has no understanding, empathy or insight. He sounds more like the young French prick that thought that the prostitutes were “having a good time”.

    The real subject of the article and of prostitution and human trafficking is the *suffering* it causes. Recently, I have seen that suffering first hand in someone and I can tell you it has affected me. The people that make prostitution a part of their business plan and use people like that should be murdered as directly as possible, regardless of nationality or place. The people, such as the local police that take bribes to allow this to happen should get the same since they are less than human.

  • SeoulFinn

    I had a great weekend. Actually, the 9 days I’ve been in Korea have been pretty awesome! Certainly beats being at home. I almost dread the time when I’ve to go back to the oh so boring Finland. Cheers!

  • RolyPoly

    English teachers are dealing pots? I guess they are some demand since Korean utensils are produced in poor quality.

    What are they going to sell next, tupperwares?

  • RolyPoly

    Year of the Dragon,
    “Until recently, for instance, the police in Barcelona did not even realise Chinese mafias ran prostitution rings in the city.”

    Are these policemen a bunch of idiots? “Even realize”? As innocent as babies in the woods? A bunch of nincompoops?

    Or, are they on the take? Using the Chinese to run the shop while they take the profit?

    I am not condoning the Chinky mob. I just saying there are evil people everywhere.

  • RolyPoly

    Morality, as Europeans so use to show that they are superior, comes from the belief in Jesus Christ. In Thailand, where this “morality” is not recognized, school children save their money to see the local prostitute. And, it is well-accepted in the society as norm.

    When Europeans and Americans leave their Christ, would they still be able to maintain this morality? I think not. Brave New World, Baby.

    In fifty or so years, Europe will turn into Thailand. Prostitution will not only accepted but celebrated. As part of human behavior. When Christ is removed from society, people will accept anything. Embraced them!

    Meanwhile, Korean Christians will spread gospel in Asian countries. Who knows Thailand may become Christian nation and ban prostitution.

    Who are moral people? Jesus people, that is the answer.

  • CactusMcHarris

    There’s proof Hallyu is reaching the shores of Canadian / American advertising. A new aspirin (Bayer?) commercial has a Western fellow being asked by a Korean stewardess (in Urimal!!!) what can she get him. He points to the word for headache (in Hangul, with the English on the other page). Anyway, long story short, her English is native (IMO), her Korean is deliciously exotic (as is she), and it’s nice to bore all of your friends with teaching them rudimentary Korean.

    Korea, Pain Fighting!

  • Charles Tilly

    In their recent issue, the Monthly Joong Ang (월간중앙) has an interview with famous Korean novelist Yi Munyol (이문열).

    Added bonus: It’s free!

  • RolyPoly
  • αβγδε

    Baduk,

    You still peddling that Lord of the Rings, Christian archaica on the net? Aiiish.

    Anyway, Happy Easter/Bunny/Vernal Equinox day to you too!

    A world purified of false religion would convert Easter to a more meaningful holiday – an appreciation for the revolution of our planet around a beautiful star, our Sun, and with that the passage of time with the solemn hope and longing for a life filled with more light. That’s how Easter should be celebrated. Better the appreciation of Nature than the false fib about dead Jew who can never return.

  • brier

    Easter weekend over, and a four day work week to look forward to. Decided to circumnavigate Yeouido yesterday. The saetgung ecological park surprised for design and and beauty as along as you blocked out the highway. The new new marina looked nice but seemed more as a backdrop for high priced restaurants & coffe shops. By the 63 Building you can almost get a feeling for what Yeouido was be for development, a hugh sandbar of an island. Also the modern apartments contrasted wealth and time with the older blocks still standing. Still I imagine the older ones are still pricey.

  • dogbertt

    Gotcha dogbertt!
    :)

    Nope, I got _you_, because while your comments require moderation, main sail straight through.

    Then again, when you have admins openly calling for unidentified people to be murdered, I’m not exactly sure what that’s worth.

  • Iang nio

    #80 RP.

    This guy is a cult leader televangelist raking in megabucks on the ‘prosperity bandwagon’ (first promoted by Abraham-Hicks) mainly to fill his own coffers. Do some research into cult leaders and sects and JO fits the bill like the greedy fist in the glove. The first few lines turned me off – for real.

    #81 Beautifully put!

  • Jieun K

    WARNING: Disturbing content.

    If you ever fall in imminent danger of being brutally murdered here, do not have high hopes for local police officers coming to your rescue. No use calling them in ’cause all they’ll do for you is almost just sit on their asses while your desperate call for help will run for seven frigging minutes. You’ll eventually die and get filleted after which they’ll frantically try to cover their sorry asses.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Weren’t they complaining just a couple of months ago, that the government was supplying “nice enough” free meals to them?

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    (wasn’t)

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    Jieun — The police took their sweet time getting around to the call for help. Thirteen hours, in fact.

  • Jieun K

    Brendon: 280 bits. I feel so devastated. And enraged. That cannot possibly be the best protection and/or assistance that the Korean police force can provide for the weaker sex.

    What a shame.

  • Creo69

    Good lord. This article says that two police officers (who were with the victim’s sister) were sleeping in their car while the search was in process. Unbelievable.

    http://www.koreaherald.com/national/Detail.jsp?newsMLId=20120409000979

  • hamel

    Jieun K: what does 280 bits mean?

    I saw that story on the news last night. It was awful.

  • Jieun K

    Hamel: Awful, indeed. You’ll get it if you combine my two comments above. (That’s what the monster did to her.)

  • jkitchstk

    Since the Suwon police chief is taking responsibility the suspect will get an even lighter sentence than normal Korean rapists and murderers? Shall the police chief be put in jail or is he just kidding when he says he’ll take full responsibility? More lies! When will they stop?

  • Creo69

    He is the commander of the entire national police force…not just Suwon.

  • hamel

    Sorry to draw this thread away from the awful events of Suwon, and the justified resignation of the National Police Commander, I want to share this piece that I just read, that talks about ideology, and managers to cover the Falkland Islands, North Korea (and Brian Myers), and the Republican primaries all in one column:
    http://www.theyorker.co.uk/comment/politics/10977

    Does anybody else think it is well written?

    Robert K: I’d love to read your thoughts.

  • jkitchstk

    # 94,
    Okay, he was the guy who came up with the brilliant idea for the Angry Birds to symbolize anti-bullying. That means the cops that weren’t sleeping in their cars must’ve been too busy to respond because they were too busy playing Angry Birds while working?

  • Creo69

    Actually, two of the responding officers were found to have been sleeping…makes you wonder what the ones who didn’t respond were doing.

  • jkitchstk

    Bubba Watson adopts child two weeks ago and now wins 2012 Masters. Is it true S. Korea wouldn’t let him adopt a little girl?
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2127168/Bubba-Watson-Masters-winner-celebrated-adopting-child-wife-Angie-weeks-ago.html

  • PekingMan

    Which world capital shall be celebrating a major anniversary of their hereditary leader, hosting mass games and finally finishing off a huge glass pyramid hotel skyscraper funded by Arabs this summer…

    …yep, London, now twinned with Pyongyang, apparently.

    http://www.architizer.com/en_us/blog/dyn/24211/london-or-pyongyang/

  • Charles Tilly

    That’s funny. I always thought that 이외수 was a hardcore supporter of South Korea’s leftist political parties. I guess not in this instance.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936
  • YangachiBastardo

    Don’t know if this was posted already:

    http://www.corriere.it/gallery/esteri/04-2012/north_korea/02/corea-nord-scatti-vita-quotidiana-rubati_ff682be4-825e-11e1-9c86-d5f7abacde61.shtml#3

    Apparently some France Presse guy, while on his way to visit the satellite launch station, managed to snap a few unauthorised pics of Norkland…cool stuff imho

  • DLBarch

    The sad thing is that in North Korea, that house probably does pass for a “palazzo.”

    John Ruskin would not be amused!

    DLB

  • DLBarch

    Ah, here’s one for the MH lawyers out there: Are five sweeter words in the practice of law than “Motion for Summary Judgment — Granted.”

    Time to pack away those trial binders and get back to the really important work of monitoring the goings on on MH!

    DLB

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    How is the biggest story in the country relegated to a few random open thread comments? The audio recording of that poor woman’s 112 call will make a grown man cry.

    At the top of the long list of disgusting and disturbing aspects of the case is the fact that neighbors heard her screaming for her life and failed to do anything because they assumed it was only domestic violence involving a husband and wife. And according to reports, the cops sat on their useless asses and failed to take it seriously for the exact same reason. Although given their general incompetence, there were surely loads of other reasons they fucked it up as well.

    So apparently any Korean females calling 112 in the future need to spend the first few minutes of their desperate call clarifying that they’re being beaten/raped/murdered by a non-spouse in order to elevate the level of response from Don’t give a fuck to We’ll be there in 12 hours instead of 13.

    An astronomical fucking disgrace even by the bottom of the barrel Korean cop standards.

  • YangachiBastardo

    An astronomical fucking disgrace even by the bottom of the barrel Korean cop standards

    Agreed…not quite sure it’s not a case of pot calling the kettle black though

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    Agreed…not quite sure it’s not a case of pot calling the kettle black though

    Your equivalency is lazy, not only with the relative scale of police incompetency compared in these specific cases, but in how it relates to the levels of overall incompetence of law enforcement in each country. I’ll give you a hint: One is the standard proving the rule. The other is more of an exception to it.

    More accurately, it’s the difference between criticizing cops for not putting a puzzle together when presented with scattered and unrelated pieces that appear to connect with the benefit of hindsight, and criticizing them for having a 99% whole puzzle shoved right in their faces and they’re too fucking stupid and lazy to stick the last piece in on their own.

    But these distinctions are likely meaningless to someone whose simplistic goal is to claim that A is bad and B is bad, so A & B ARE EQUALLY BAD.

  • ecw

    What exactly is the evidence for American police competence?

    We would suffer less crime, especially violent crime, if our police were replaced wholesale by the Korean police, if only we were allowed more free association.

  • jk6411

    #105,

    The audio recording of that poor woman’s 112 call will make a grown man cry.

    Actually.. that wasn’t the actual recording of the 112 call.
    The police did not release the actual recording, just the transcript.
    What you heard was a re-creation of that call.

    Not that it makes this case any easier to stomach.. But just wanted to let you know.


    I seriously hope that this victim’s death will not have been in vain.
    The Korean police have a lot of improving to do.

    BTW, I heard that there are places in Korea with high populations of foreigners which are very dangerous at night. I hope Korean police gets tougher, like the NYPD. Korea is changing; the police should adapt.

    Also, it’s my impression that during the era of military presidents the Korean police were too tough, but nowadays with Korea’s democratization it seems they’ve gotten too soft. Am I correct in this?

  • Sonagi

    Well, this is interesting. I wonder how much of the initial gap between Japanese and American young adults is explained by differences in parenting, in community behavioral norms, and in formal education. The reasoning test in this study used open-ended questions with rubrics to evaluate constructed answers versus a multiple choice test with only one correct answer, which US students start taking repeatedly in kindergarten, yes, kindergarten. Life experiences help Americans, or at least those who survive into their 70s, catch up and surpass their Japanese counterparts by a few points. I wonder if our wide longevity gaps between socioeconomic groups might explain why elderly Americans appear to have slightly stronger reasoning skills than their Japanese peers. Unhealthy lifestyle choices and inadequate health care weed out some of the low scorers.

  • YangachiBastardo

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2009/10/30/punish-the-onlookers.html

    This doesn’t make American civil society as a whole look great either…i don’t know, i may be totally wrong but i have the impression that law enforcement in America, like many other things (food, healthcare, education, housing) etc. varies a lot from excellent to 4th world according to the ‘hood you’re in…hey not that in my country it is any better, it just shows a bit less dispersion around the average, which generally range from dumpy to dumpier

    BTW, I heard that there are places in Korea with high populations of foreigners which are very dangerous at night. I hope Korean police gets tougher, like the NYPD. Korea is changing; the police should adapt.

    Also, it’s my impression that during the era of military presidents the Korean police were too tough, but nowadays with Korea’s democratization it seems they’ve gotten too soft. Am I correct in this?

    I personally agree and i wouldn’t count on any crackdown on crime any time soon…unfortunately it is a a typical pattern of relatively young democracies, the tendency to look down on law enforcement.

    I hope the criminal rights phase in Korea will be a quickly passing fad, personally i like Japanese criminal justice system strictness, including their healthy, generous use of the capital punishment

  • hamel

    I wanted to share this article about a recent lecture given by Prof. Bruce Cumings:

    On Mar. 29, the Asian Studies and Asian American Studies departments co-sponsored a lecture by Cumings, a history professor at the University of Chicago. The lecture, titled “The Kims’ Three Bodies: How Dynastic Succession Works in North Korea,” discussed the time around the death of Kim Jong-Il and the diplomatic history between North Korea and the United States.

    [...]

    Cumings admitted he could have worked for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Nonetheless, he said one should not mix being a scholar and working for the CIA.

    “My father was a Germanic professor and was asked to join the CIA as an analyst,” Cumings said. “Next thing he knew, he was taken to a safe house where Hitler’s agents were being interrogated.”

    I don’t know if the anecdote given above is meant to exemplify his preceding statement, but if it is, I don’t get it. I think that academics is sometimes most interesting when the “rubber hits the road.”

    Cumings quoted from William Perry in 1999. “‘We might have to accept North Korea as it is rather than as we would like it to be.’ [The statement] was a watershed, quickly forgotten after the Bush Administration came in, that lead to North Korean general Cho Myung-Rok visiting the Oval Office in 2000.”

    I think this is quite true. Good on Perry for saying that. Bad on Bush for forgetting that during his first term.

    Answering a question about the new impact of the 2012 presidential elections around the world, including the U.S. and South Korean elections, Cumings said, “Kim Jong-Un will lay low until the results come out, and we will have to wait until April 15, which is the century anniversary of the birth of Kim Il-Sung.”

    KIS 100 coming up this Sunday. Stay glued to your screens, folks!

  • jkitchstk

    # 108 eew,
    “What exactly is the evidence for American police competence?”

    How about 20+ years of “Cops” on TV…
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JytRQcxMOuY&feature=relmfu

  • hamel

    Recently, a Korean columnist at Newsfinder wrote a column belatedly responding to a NYT column by Prof Brian Myers in May 2010.

    마이어 교수의 기고를 새삼 소개하는 이유는 북한의 천안함 폭침을 부정하는, 이 땅의 철딱서니 없는 젊은이들 때문이다. 조선일보가 천안함 폭침 2주기를 맞아 실시한 여론조사에서 ‘천안함 폭침이 북한의 소행이란 정부 발표를 믿는다’는 응답이 20~30대에서 55.8%에 그친 것으로 나타났다. 절반 가까이가 북한의 천안함 폭침을 믿지 않고 온갖 괴담과 유언비어에 빠져있다는 반증이다. 특히 정부 발표를 믿지 않는 비율은 20대 여성(45.6%)과 30대 남성(43.1%)에서 가장 높았다. 대한민국 국민이기를 포기한 것이나 다름없다.

    Read the rest on your own. It is pretty interesting. Myers’ original piece is attached at the bottom for your reference.

  • RolyPoly
  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    I wanted to share this article about a recent lecture given by Prof. Bruce Cumings…

    Bruce Cumings was born in 1943, which means he’s about to turn 70. I fervently hope that Cumings lives to see the fall of the DPRK and the release of its internal records which will humiliate him as an apologist for North Korea starting the war, for the surveillance state, for the prison camps and cannibalism. He richly deserves to be directly rebuked by prisoners of that state.

  • JG29A

    If only I could invent an easily carried, relatively inexpensive device that, with a small amount of training, could easily equalize the imbalance of force between a peaceful, innocent woman walking home and a hulking man-monster. Why, I’ll bet that as soon as they finish parading me through the streets, the first thing the Korean government will do is to guarantee every law-abiding individual the basic human right to carry one!

  • jkitchstk

    Congratulations Bubba Watson – 2012 Masters Champion! Who said golf was a snobby sport?
    “Under the porch, over the roof, and into the hot tub.” No golf lessons “If you can’t beat me you can’t teach me.” He was named after Bubba Smith.
    “Wacky World of Bubba Watson”
    http://entertainment.verizon.com/video/play/757559/channels/cnn/us

  • jkitchstk

    UnBubbalievable! Bubbalicious! Bend it like Bubba!

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    @116

    I don’t think Cumings is an apologist for North Korea. so much as his obsession with debunking some of the pieties of US foreign policy leads him to write extremely tendentious history.

  • Iang nio

    I don’t think it is appropriate to spit on the Korean police when the LAPD is one of the most corrupt ‘law enforcement’ bodies on the payroll around. Not to mention the Rodney King beatings that led to the LA riots (which affected Korea town considerably at the time).

    That being said, if women were taught to defend themselves pepper spray will go a looong way to have a woman not be completely left empty handed. I saw the story two days prior to making it to MH.

    As more details are coming out, it still is a despicable lack of ‘response’ to a genuine emergency. and as jk6411 has noted here, one can only hope that this will be considered a serious wake-up call for the police to be given a good ‘spring cleaning’ and complete overhaul as to how police is dealing with these kinds of incidents.

    From the Chosun’s article yesterday:

    On the evening of April 1, the victim was abducted by Wu Yuanchun (42), an ethnic Korean from China, and dragged into his home. But she managed to call police on her mobile phone. According to police, the woman was dragged into Wu’s home at around 10:50 p.m.

    Police Under Fire for Slow Response to Murder Victim’s Call

    The suspect told police he murdered the woman in his room at around 5 a.m. on April 2. That means police had a full six hours to rescue her.

    Officers initially claimed the woman’s call last only one minute when it actually lasted for seven minutes and 36 seconds.

    After murdering the woman, Wu chopped her body into pieces. A forensic expert who conducted an autopsy on the woman described the condition of her body as “too horrific for words.” The National Forensic Service received 14 plastic bags filled with altogether 280 body parts. “He butchered her,” the official added.

    Police on Sunday told reporters, “Based on Wu’s testimony, it looks like he tried to rape her but failed. At times, such a horrific murder is an expression of frustration with being unable to rape someone.”

    http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2012/04/09/2012040900914.html

  • YangachiBastardo

    Said so all the officers (including those in the chain of command) involved in this horrid, abominable fiasco should be at the very bare minimum fired and face trial on various counts

  • dww

    I don’t think it is appropriate to spit on the Korean police when the LAPD is one of the most corrupt ‘law enforcement’ bodies on the payroll around.

    I don’t follow your logic here. Both departments should be spat upon if they F-in up. You think the LAPD didn’t get spit on when Rampart and Rodney King happened?

  • cm

    Out of 16,000 residents in that district where the poor woman was butchered, 3000 of the residents are illegal immigrants. The ethnic Korean from China is also an illegal. According to people, he’s been traveling all over Korea taking in odd jobs. His mastery at cutting up the body in hundreds of pieces leads to suspicions that this is not his first murder. When they count up all the missing person’s reports, they found that over 180 women are missing from districts where the killer resided during his stays. There are strong suspicions that he’s responsible for at least some of those missing cases. I don’t know how many women he has killed, he is one sick in the head dude. He also lied numerously without even raising an eyebrow, even leading the police to believe him (not that the Korean police are that competent). He sounds like another Kim Ho Sun (another Korean mass killer who got apprehended few years ago) – quiet and law abiding on the outside, a monster inside with propensity for lying.

  • Iang nio

    #123 “You think the LAPD didn’t get spit on when Rampart and Rodney King happened?”

    I didn’t say they weren’t… It’s just here (…) the comments are mega quick in bashing the Korean police (who I do not make excuses – to put that straight), and too easily ‘forgetting’ about the abusive, expanding police ‘force’ creeping into every day people’s lives and existence in the US… “The grass is always ‘greener’ on the other side” – or is it?

    It was merely an observation of what is commonly referred to as ‘blind spot’. We all have them but it might be worth remembering that police ‘force’ has been abused for as long as it’s been around. Nowhere is ‘better’ or ‘worse’ – but “just as”. Unfortunately, me thinks that ‘sexism’ and the chauvinistic attitude that is prevalent in Korean society towards women in general might have had something to do with the lame duck response by the police.

  • cm

    #125 Iang nio, there has been heavy bashing of the police from the Korean public and the media. Those criticisms laid out by some here, are not unwarranted. This incident should be used by the Korean public to reflect upon the state of the Korean society, and the public attitude toward domestic family violence. It’s not just the police who deserve the criticism. There were so many people there who could have helped that woman, but decided not to get involved and call the police. The police also complain that when they try to carry out investigations by interviewing neighborhood people, too many residents simply refuse to cooperate and just shut the door on the police.

  • Iang nio

    #125 “This incident should be used by the Korean public to reflect upon the state of the Korean society, and the public attitude toward domestic family violence. It’s not just the police who deserve the criticism. There were so many people there who could have helped that woman, but decided not to get involved and call the police. The police also complain that when they try to carry out investigations by interviewing neighborhood people, too many residents simply refuse to cooperate and just shut the door on the police.”

    cm, I absolutely agree with you thee. Unfortunately… that was part of my ‘criticism’.

    As a whole, a big part of human society’s attitude towards women is despicable. It doesn’t matter whether it is portrayed ‘humourously’ or in a somewhat ‘sensationalist’ fashion with the tube videos of ajummas or women per se behaving ‘outside’ the “accepted” norm – one does not have to go on a ‘slut’ walk to ask for and be treated with ‘respect’. That’s shooting right past the target and goes overboard.

    It’s a shameful incident that should make society look within but this, being the hard-as-nails realist that I am, I’m afraid, will just be forgotten in a few weeks. As long as human rights issues do not entail women’s rights (i.e., a right to be taken seriously in their suffering and their inability to protect themselves to the same degree as a man), including domestic violence and domestic rape or incest, it’s not going to change.

    Cowardice and lack of willing to do what’s right, is betraying the victims twice – once when they are being left to their own devices and then again when the police ask for help and those ‘in the know’ they keep to their respective ‘local omerta’ or the ‘see but don’t tell’ doctrine to save their own butt.

    As long as men view women’s bodies as their property to use and abuse as they please, and as long as the patriarchal system will dictate and own a woman’s life, her destiny and society’s “order”, this will not change.

  • Charles Tilly

    The good folks at the editorial pages of the Joong Ang, Chosun and Kyunghyang makes some decent points about the importance in voting in the soon to be held election.

    But if you ask me, this upstanding young lady out does them all.

  • DLBarch

    jkitchstk @ 118/119,

    Absolutely! Bubba Watson is an American original. I can’t even imagine his story happening in most other countries. The funny thing is that golf courses across America are filled with his kind of character, which makes golfing here so much fun.

    For every snooty dentist swearing at his putter and cursing his short game, there’s a Bubba Watson with a six pack tucked into his golf back, having a good ol’ time.

    And that is a VERY good thing…for the sport and, now, for the Master’s.

    DLB

  • dogbertt

    I look forward to the inaugural Bubba Watson/John Daly Pro-Am.

  • dogbertt

    If your goal is to moderate the perceived unfair criticism of the KNP’s failure to act to save the woman, I suppose you could do so by pointing out the shortcomings of police in any number of countries, including Germany in the ’30s, Rwanda in the ’90s, and Norway recently. By making the sole comparison to Daryl Gates’ LAPD in the early ’90s, you are merely giving vent to your anti-American hysteria. But I’m sure it’s comfort to the slaughtered woman’s family that the LAPD was naughty 20 years ago.

  • DLBarch

    So last night I get a call from an old Japanese friend who’s in town for three days but only lets me know the night before he’s scheduled to head back to Osaka. We meet over beers in a town on the coast just south of San Francisco called Half Moon Bay. Seems his “business trip” included an extra day — due to a non-existent “flight delay” — to allow him to get in a day of surfing.

    Anyway, the subject of surfing in Korea comes up, and I tell him that except for some mediocre surf on the East Coast near the DMZ, and equally mediocre surf on the south shore of Jeju, Korea is not, ahem, known for its surfing.

    Au contraire, he says…and goes into a lengthy defense of Korea’s hidden and untapped surfing potential. I roll my eyes and order another round.

    This morning, I find this email in my inbox:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0_ZPRBBKaE&feature=related

    The beginning is a little cheesy, and I’ll let others decide whether this still falls into the “mediocre” category, but who’da guessed?

    DLB

  • Iang nio

    #131 “By making the sole comparison to Daryl Gates’ LAPD in the early ’90s, you are merely giving vent to your anti-American hysteria. But I’m sure it’s comfort to the slaughtered woman’s family that the LAPD was naughty 20 years ago.”

    No. My post was put on hold. If it would’ve been posted as it was meant to (prior to your reply) it would’ve put things into perspective.

    As is, somebody here seems to be too chicken to just have someone have a broader perspective than what is ‘accepted’ per a specific viewpoint – whatever THAT is.

    The thought police is on watch.

  • slim

    “I don’t follow your logic here. Both departments should be spat upon if they F-in up. You think the LAPD didn’t get spit on when Rampart and Rodney King happened?”

    There is no logic here. The LAPD could not even exist, it could be as bad as the Chinese cops in Tibet or it could be the most wonderful unit on the planet and absolutely NOTHING would change about the Korean police bungling this murder or any criticism of it. A “broader perspective” likewise still leaves this victim dead and the local police with a lot of explaining to do.

    Working logic into your world view would help reduce reliance on cliche, cartoon and conspiracy theories.

  • CactusMcHarris

    You wouldn’t expect this kind of race to generate excitement, but you’d be wrong – all glory to the Dear Dead Comrades Fuzzbang and Whizball.

    http://deadspin.com/5900884/ukranian-wins-glorious-north-korea-marathon-in-photo-finish

  • dogbertt

    What Slim said.

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    What dogbertt said.

  • bumfromkorea

    @dogbertt

    Germany in the ’30s

    Actually, I’d say the cops in the ’30s Germany were “horrendously” good at their job. So much that it became a problem.

  • YangachiBastardo
  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    The threat was only credible because the threatener had specific knowledge of the plane, the mechanics and procedures of Korean Air. I smell a disgruntled current or ex-worker out to hurt Korean Air’s reputation.

  • DLBarch

    For those who hung on every word he wrote and spoke, and who enjoyed every minute of it, today is the late Hitch’s birthday.

    Calls for a moment of remembrance and most definitely raising a pint of your favorite!

    L’chaim,
    DLB