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‘No Korean passengers’

So, a photo of a Taiwanese cab with a sign “No Korean passengers” has some Korean netizens upset, reports the Chosun Ilbo.

Chosun.com’s diligent researchers found that taxis with these signs first appeared after the big taekwondo mess in the 2010 Asian Games.

At least one netizen who saw the photo posted, “Why do they do this to us only when they love Japan?”

Anti-Korean sentiment has been on the rise in Taiwan since Korea entered into diplomatic relations with the PRC in 1990, and reportedly has been increasing drastically since 2004, when Korea’s per capita income surpassed Taiwan’s. Or so the Chosun said.

A 41-year-old Mr. Lee, who recently returned to Korea after living in Taiwan, said something like jealousy has spread quickly around Taiwan over the last couple of years as Korea began to surpass Taiwan in terms of economic power and recognition. Conspicuous behavior by some Koreans who openly belittle countries doing less well than Korea seems to have set off these feelings, too, he said. He recently witnessed restaurants that won’t accept Koreans as well.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • redwhitedude

    If the cabs had put that sign up in the US they would be in big trouble. Years ago a Japanese restaurant in NY was turning away non Japanese and as a result they got warned by the NY attorney general.

    I’ve always wondered where this Korea bashing was coming from the Chinese aside from the controversy of the NE project that the mainland was engaging in.

    It just seems that asians get a bit too nationalistic about their economies. I guess this is the downside of being like that.

  • cm

    This is just bizarre. The signs are professionally printed, which means these are company wide policy of not accepting passengers of particular nationality over a Taekwondo judging contest which didn’t even involve Korean players, and over manufactured rumors of Koreans stealing Chinese culture and history.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    and I only discovered today that Calbee…

    is Japanese (not Korean)…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calbee

  • SomeguyinKorea

    So, xenophobia is caused by jealousy. I wonder how that argument would fly if it was made about the anti-American and anti-Japanese sentiments held by some Koreans.

  • cm

    #4 – with a bit of a difference. Japan colonized Korea, America has troops in Korea. Both have baggage that can be used by whomever wants to exploit.

    But Korea on Taiwan? What excuse does Taiwan have over Korea? Historically there has been very little contact with each other. I can’t think of anything, other than the 1992 diplomatic break off with Taiwan and recognition of China.

  • CactusMcHarris

    Wait until I get my ‘Sailors and dogs keep off the grass’ translated and printed for the naval base in Cheju – there’s going to be carnage.

  • DLBarch

    CMcH @6,

    You meant “Pirates and dogs,” right?

    DLB

  • CactusMcHarris

    Brother D,

    As a former sailor (all of 12 days at sea on the Vinson!) but only a fantasy pirate, I defer to your legal advice on whether it’s to be pirate or privateer.

  • DLBarch

    Ah, goooooooood point, sir (and one the Ms. Kim should clarify herself.)

    If it’s sanctioned by the crown (or whatever), then its privateering.

    Very sharp, Mr. McH! And shame on me for not getting there first!

    DLB

    P.S. Truth be told, yes, I know privateers are private persons, but I dig your thinking, so full credit, brah!

  • CactusMcHarris

    I was just reading about Jean Lafitte, DLB, who as you know was both, but since you’re the senior sailing correspondent here, I don’t know nothin’ about real sailing, except I like to say ‘gunwhale’.

  • CactusMcHarris

    #9,

    It seems to me that there could be profit made from the seizure of Chinese fishing boats, so maybe LMB can help his budget for the ROKN go farther by giving some of the Navy letters of marque (?).

    And I meant to mention that I applaud you for having to ask what SNSD meant – ignorance can be quite liberating. I spent two weeks recently without a TV and am looking forward to 2 weeks more. Now if I can just figure out how to turn my vinyl Mozart collection into digital for my Ipod…

  • DLBarch

    Mozart on vinyl? Jeez, you must be a real connoisseur! (To this day, M’s clarinet concerto in A — yes, from Out of Africa fame — remains one of my all-time favorite pieces.)

    Or as my high school German teacher once memorably declared, “A little Mozart goes a long way with me.”

    As for favorite nautical vocabulary, since this is a Korean blog, some PoliSci/Korean Studies types and English instructors alike might be interested in knowing that the term “slush fund” was originally a nautical term…and one with a positive meaning.

    But if you want to know the etymology, ya’ll are going to have to look it up yerselves.

    Ahoy,
    DLB

  • enomoseki

    taiwanese are truly laughable creatures.

    It’s really funny to see people who are pettier than Koreans.

  • DLBarch

    BTW, I meant to add this earlier, but shouldn’t the sign on the taxi window be in Korean?

    It’s almost as if the goal of the anti-Korean campaign isn’t really to deny ridership to Korean passengers, but to inform Chinese and Americans and presumably other foreigners that Koreans aren’t welcome.

    Odd, no?

    DLB

  • enomoseki

    And I doubt the foreigners or other nationals couldn’t give a flying fuck about what they think nor what they are bitching about.

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ kuiwon

    BTW, I meant to add this earlier, but shouldn’t the sign on the taxi window be in Korean?

    It’s almost as if the goal of the anti-Korean campaign isn’t really to deny ridership to Korean passengers, but to inform Chinese and Americans and presumably other foreigners that Koreans aren’t welcome.

    Interestingly enough, one of my Taiwanese colleague’s parents told me that whenever Koreans visited Taiwan back during the 1970s or 80s (and before), they would communicate to the denizens by writing Chinese characters on their notepads.

  • http://globalasianculture.com Liz

    I have to say, Hallyu is a strange beast. On one hand it probably has the average Taiwanese man/woman viewing Korean dramas and listening to Girls’ Generation more frequently than they should. But on the other, it’s equally feasible the natives are becoming overwhelmed with either the pop culture hegemony that’s arrived on their shores or the South Koreans who they suddenly feel could lord things over them, at least in the sense Korean trends are dominating the airwaves.

    I’m also curious whether there have been incidents in Taiwanese cabs involving Korean passengers. It seems a little weird that taxis would take such a draconian stand over a sporting event that happened two years ago, or a diplomatic break-off that happened in the early nineties.

    And while this may not be entirely relevant to the conversation, my advice to Taiwanese sick of Korean pop culture is simply to go back to their old ways. Stick to Cosplay, J-pop, and Hello Kitty paraphernalia. Nothing wrong with that.

  • dogbertt

    Interestingly enough, one of my Taiwanese colleague’s parents told me that whenever Koreans visited Taiwan back during the 1970s or 80s (and before), they would communicate to the denizens by writing Chinese characters on their notepads.

    I’ve done the same in the PRC.

  • austin

    Not sure if this has any relevance but in Manila a few weeks ago I saw some Filipinos wearing red T shirts that read in big black lettering, “Trust me- I’m Korean!”

  • Ssamzi

    It’s no secret that Taiwanese politica has chosen South Korea as the convenient and safe ‘external enemy’. Taiwanese media has repeatedly forged false rumors about Korea to incite anti-Korean sentiments. This was easily fueled by their sense of crisis with growing Korean influence and industrial competition. During the TKD incident, their motivation came out very blatantly with all the over-the-top anti-Korean asshattery some politicians shamelessly played.

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    what did koreans ever do to the taiwanese except give them good entertainment?

    btw, where’s the expat anger over this? i thought all of you were against racism. why aren’t you screaming about this?

    cause it ain’t you. you special.

  • Creo69

    “btw, where’s the expat anger over this? i thought all of you were against racism. why aren’t you screaming about this?”

    Because sometimes “what goes around comes around” …

  • Creo69

    “btw, where’s the expat anger over this? i thought all of you were against racism. why aren’t you screaming about this?”

    I am actually wondering where the folks are who always use the “it’s not racism…it’s xenophobiaaaaaaaa” line are. Taiwanese and Koreans are all Asians, correct?

  • cm

    “I’m also curious whether there have been incidents in Taiwanese cabs involving Korean passengers. ”

    Liz, there was a case of a Japanese guy who beat up on a Taiwanese taxi driver, which made headlines, but that went no where. If that was a Korean guy, I’m pretty sure things would be much different.

    Instead, it’s much more complicated. It’s web of culture/history wars waging on the internet, and in some cases, in the Chinese language media printing manufactured stories of Koreans claiming such people like Sun Yet Sen, and Yao Ming as Koreans. As Taiwan is part of the Chinese identity, they ally themselves with the mainlanders when it comes to culture and history. Koreans are accused of theft of Chinese culture and history where they are accused of attempting to claim Chinese things as Korean origin. This view is so widespread that it is now become the norm, and the truth in Asia, as frustrating and maddening as it is.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #20,
    Yup, which parallels the point I was getting at in my comment at #4.

  • Ssamzi

    cm summed it up. While Koreans didn’t even notice, there were lots of hate-mongering going on based on manufactured rumors. A lot of them have been constantly debunked by Koreans and Korean media who realized this later but the hate campaign has already gained serious momentum. Taiwanese, Chinese and Japanese media and nationalists are all involved in this. Messy and ugly. Ah, Asia.

  • Ssamzi

    For example, it works like this. There are basically a group of Japanese nationalists who dedicated their life to gathering ammunition against Korea, monitoring everything from Korea. They find an obscure fringe claim related to Chinese cultural heritage that 99% of Koreans have never heard or care about. This is transferred to the Taiwanese nationalists and their anti-Korean media picks it up and publish it as a legit story. Rinse and repeat this ten times. It is then transferred to China, enraging them who are very sensitive about stuff like this. Suddenly, it becomes a fact that average Koreans believe Confucious was Korean. Now Koreans visit Taiwan or China and get asked like “why you ignorant Koreans claim Confucious is yours?!!!” only to give their WTF looks back.

  • http://globalasianculture.com Liz

    Has anyone else been reading the comments below the Chosun Ilbo article? I haven’t read all of them, but many of them are giving off soundbytes with a shrug. “Oh well, we’re better off than they are,” or “Let’s try to understand they have a chip on the shoulder.” These probably weren’t the usual boatload of comments on reports of anti-Korean sentiments, maybe 4, 5 years ago, so it’s interesting, and a welcome change really, to see Korean netizens brushing off slights like these and just getting on with their lives.

    @24
    I’ve heard about the Japanese-guy-Taiwan-taxi incident, though completely at random. I believe he was with a half-Japanese, Taiwanese celebrity when it happened. The star in question, Makiyo, was apparently caught on film kicking the unfortunate taxi driver. Link: http://www.maydaily.com/2012/02/09/makiyo-caught-on-film-kicking-taxi-driver/

    @27
    If it’s just fringe elements battling fringe elements, don’t know why the rest of the population of China and Korea have to get sucked in. Kind of unfair if you think about it.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Koreans are accused of theft of Chinese culture and history where they are accused of attempting to claim Chinese things as Korean origin. This view is so widespread that it is now become the norm, and the truth in Asia, as frustrating and maddening as it is.

    Koreans brought it all upon themselves, didn’t they?

    If only they would stop plagiarising and stealing things….

  • Ssamzi

    @Liz
    As it’s been pointed out, it’s all blown out in full force because Taiwanese mainstream media keeps stirring it up and that’s delivered to other Chinese-speaking people. They even made up fictional Korean profs a few times. They really do go far. Recently, some Taiwanese media fabricated an article about Jeremy Lin yet again, which was interestingly debunked by some Taiwanese netizens themselves who got sick of the trick this time.

    @Year of the Dragon
    What drug are you on?

  • Maekchu

    I tried going into a Korean club this past Saturday that had a sign on the door that said “No Foreigners Allowed”.

    So if Korea does this to foreigners, why are they upset if someone does the same to them? Hypocrites!

  • enomoseki

    @31

    LOL, the koreans aren’t upset. They couldn’t give a flying fuck about what those butthurt islanders think. Most of Koreans doesn’t even know what taiwan is and sometimes even gets confused with much more respectable country like Thailand.

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    koreans arent hurt. you have to care to be hurt.

  • mtr25500

    i’m with enomoseki

    btw, Maekchu is a f_cking cretin.

  • provIdence

    @3; It must be known to everyone here, some more examples are found here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaOCQ9AQyP0&feature=player_embedded

  • Ssamzi

    @provIdence
    Look. That is the perfect example of negative campaigns waged by desperate Japanese nationalists who spend too much time collecting those obscure petty ammunition against Koreans. As if there is lack of things to mock Japan in the same petty manner. It’s funny how you expect people here to take it seriously.

  • cm

    #4, Year of Dragon, Calbee and Haitai formed a legal joint venture to bring Calbee snacks to Korea. The joint venture is a 50-50 joint ownership. They have Calbee chips in Hong Kong too. Of course the people like #35 will use that and make a biased video to say Korea ripped it off from Japan.

  • cm

    To be clear, Calbee is a Japanese company, Haitai is a Korean confectionery company.

  • provIdence

    The link given at #35 may not be too far-fetched if “Calbee” at #3 is insinuating Saewookkang although it is not apparent from the context. A comment given by cm at “Choco Pies” appears to support the insinuation.
    By the way, Saewookkang (1979), a counterpart of Calbee’s Kappa Ebisen (1964), comes not from Haitai but from Nong Shim (former Lotte Industrial), according to the “Kappa Ebisen” entry of Wiki (in Japanese). If she is Vivian, she is courageous.

  • Cloud

    @10 My favorite sailing expressions learned from my dad were “batten down the hatches” and “prepare to come about”.

    @Liz – I’d like to take this opportunity to apologize for once confusing you with a commenter who lives in Japan. I think her name is Lianne?

    @24 Even this SI writer claims “even in South Korea, where some, while tracing his ancestral roots to their country, rather ridiculously tried to make the case that he was a quarter Korean.” http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/magazine/sportsman/11/27/Jeremy-Lin-Albert-Chen/index.html#ixzz2Dl6EyxiA

    Is is just me or does @Creo69 seem increasingly angry and bitter? Do you think he got his heart broken by a 꽃 미 남?