≡ Menu

North Korean MRLs move south and South Korean socks move north

According to the Mainichi Daily News (February 29, 2012):

North Korea has deployed an improved, longer-range version of its 240 mm multiple rocket launcher….North Korea spent several years trying to improve the rocket launchers and has now completed the work. To test the upgraded version, it reportedly imported 300 mm shells from Russia and test-fired them for years off the west coast.

These new rocket launchers may have a range of 120 kms putting Seoul well within range.  Why are they doing it?

“North Korea is probably trying to threaten South Korea and the U.S. by making the rocket launchers public and use them as a propaganda material at home and abroad on Kim Il Sung’s centennial.”

While the North is moving their long-range missiles forward, peace groups in the South are sending socks by balloons to the North.

North Korea Peace is made up of activists from all over the world. On the last Saturday of every month, the organization launches several balloons across the border, a box of socks attached to each one.

The boxes are tied with string, which is attached to a timer. After three hours of travel, the timer releases the string, sending thousands of socks tumbling to North Korean ground.

Once found, the socks can be worn or sold. Socks are a rare and valuable commodity in North Korea, where many have lost toes or feet due to improper protection against the cold. The market value of a pair of socks in North Korea is $10, which is equivalent to 10 kg—or one month’s worth—of corn.

I have to admit, I do agree with them on this point:

There is also suspicion that funds sent to North Korea for relief have been used for government and military spending, said Bengtson. South Korea sent $6 billion to their neighboring nation, but a survey of North Korean defectors revealed that few had heard of the money and none had seen it.

“Blindly sending aid is not the answer,” said Bengtson.

No truer words spoken.

  • redwhitedude

    I also agree with the last point. Unfortunately the NK will not budge about giving access to NK in a way that will allow aid to go to the neediest. Also the chinese are helping propping up NK defeating any attempt at a full embargo of NK.

  • CactusMcHarris

    ‘There is also suspicion…’

    How naive are these people? Plenty, says me. Where have they been the last 20 years?

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Very Naive, for a country with apparently the highest IQ in the world, their thinking is very, very naive.

    North Korea’s policy is “Military First”, so all the aid (money, food, medicine) sent to North Korea has gone into the military.

    Should we be afraid? http://tiny.cc/ui0ve
    http://tiny.cc/c13cq
    http://tiny.cc/lc2ck

  • characteristic

    Where do you get the idea that Koreans have the highest IQ in the world? Granted, many Koreans may be intelligent, but the highest IQ? Is that true? Is that from a reliable source, and not some made up only-in-Korea boast?

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    It’s a made up only-in-Korea boast.

    But Koreans will swear it’s true.

    We all know Hong Kong’s IQ is higher. http://tiny.cc/nz7s0

  • jk6411

    Very Naive, for a country with apparently the highest IQ in the world, their thinking is very, very naive.

    No, Koreans are not naive.
    Korean conservatives, in particular, know full well that all aid sent to North Korea will automatically be used by NK to feed/bolster their military and party loyalists.
    As for Korean leftists, I’m not sure.

    BTW, it’s Brianna Hee-Young Bengsten who said that “there is suspicion that funds sent to North Korea for relief have been used for government and military spending”. Ms. Bengsten is a foreigner.

    So your comment that “Koreans are naive” was just careless.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    I thought the point of interest about the new shooters is that they can reach Osan/ humphreys.

  • jk6411

    I thought the point of interest about the new shooters is that they can reach Osan/ humphreys.

    I would like to sincerely thank South Korea’s leftists for giving North Korea the cash to beef up its military capabilities. North Korea will soon be able to target every major city, town, and village in South Korea.
    You are all guilty of treason.

  • Wedge

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Food and monetary aid is fungible. Whether it goes directly to the military or not is moot. It could go directly to the populace, which would then allow the government to divert more domestic production and other reserves of hard currency to the military.

    This is why all aid to the Norks should be stopped posthaste. It props up the existing baddies and prolongs the agony of the little guy.

  • jk6411

    North Korea will soon be able to target every major city, town, and village in South Korea.

    Sorry, I left out doghouses.
    North Korea will soon be able to target every major city, town, village, and doghouse in South Korea.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    Damn, and i’m just now building a 3 Jindo 4×8 dog palace

  • characteristic

    US forces should leave SK and let SK find its own way to deal with NK and China. SK doesn’t have to unnecessarily provoke or anger NK, but if it wants to send aid to them to keep them quiet, then by all means it should do so. If groveling to China keeps the peace in the region, then maybe SK should continue to do that, too. Or, SK can stop the internal bickering and decide to direct more of its resources for its own defense. The US shouldn’t have to keep defending Korea to the extent that it has over the decades. It’s all up to Korea.

  • cm

    #12 – not that I disagree with you about the stupidity of giving aid to NK (mostly a left party campaign promise, supported by the likes of TK), I find your tone insulting.

  • jk6411

    Sperwer,
    Better use some reinforced concrete there..

    characteristic,

    The US shouldn’t have to keep defending Korea to the extent that it has over the decades. It’s all up to Korea.

    If the U.S. leaves Korea, the power balance in the Korean peninsula will be grossly unbalanced in favor of North Korea & China. (Remember that North Korea isn’t alone; it’s backed up by its closest ally China.)

    If the U.S. left (which is exactly what North Korea wants), North Korea would probably try to re-unify the peninsula as it’s always wanted to (with Chinese support).
    Also, if the U.S. left, that would make it a lot easier for China to take over East Asia. (this is exactly what China wants)
    Do you want that?

  • characteristic

    South Korea alone could never hope to beat China militarily. But it can do far more to arm itself so that China would think twice before it let things get out of hand in its dealings with the ROK. As for NK, South Korea has far surpassed it economically, which means it can and should spend more on its defense… spending just 2.8% of GDP on defense just doesn’t cut it when you have a million+ starving troops ready to pour across the DMZ. Also tighten conscription rules so that, for example, ALL able-bodied athletes, entertainers, and sons of the high and mighty should not get to weasel out of full-term military service, while those without clout get sent to the military to get abused and get paid a pittance.

    I don’t want Korea to be conquered by China. I don’t want Korea to be destroyed. Korea has been extremely, outrageously fortunate that thus far it’s been in the US’s interest to stay and defend Korea. But what’s Korea going to do when Uncle Sam decides (as it must one day) to bring the troops home? The Korean Left are rightly criticized for appeasing the North. But the Korean Right are guilty of relying on the US too much for the country’s defense.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    @14

    It may have to join my weapons locker in ground. ;)

  • redwhitedude

    characteristic,
    it is reckless to suggest US troops leave Korea. This means that countries would assume bigger role in their defense but this could very well trigger an arms race with Japan feeling uneasy and taking a more militaristic approach as well as Korea beefing up its military to compensate for the lack of US troops. Also I’m not quite sure if the balance of power will shift dramatically in favor of NK+ China. China has whole slew of issues with their internal politics. Right now they may be able to keep a lid of protests that go on but the danger is if china were to intervene in any resulting conflict that could arise anywhere near its borders whether it be NK and SK, or with Taiwan. It could destabilize china making the whole east asia a mess.

  • jk6411

    characteristic @#15,

    Yes, I agree that South Korea should tighten up its conscription rules so that only those males who are medically unable are given exemption from military service.

    As for the U.S. leaving Korea, well I don’t that will happen too soon.
    Obama has made it clear that after the U.S. pulls its troops out of Iraq/Afghanistan, it will focus on East Asia and build up its military presence there.
    Over the long-term, China will definitely be the U.S.’s #1 adversary.
    The U.S. recognizes this, and will act accordingly.

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    If the U.S. left (which is exactly what North Korea wants), North Korea would probably try to re-unify the peninsula as it’s always wanted to (with Chinese support).

    Enough with the BS red scare. Even if South Korea surrendered tomorrow and Lee Myeong-Bak literally handed over South Korea to Kim Jong-Un, the contact between South and North Korea alone would be enough to bring down the Kim Jong-Un regime. At this point, reunification under the North Korean world order is an impossibility.

  • jk6411

    Well, since time immemorial North Korea has wanted the U.S. to leave South Korea. I wonder what they plan to do if the U.S. does leave..
    Perhaps they would like to reunify the peninsula under the “China” model, leaving the economy intact but ruling the country with an iron grip..?

    Even if South Korea surrendered tomorrow and Lee Myeong-Bak literally handed over South Korea to Kim Jong-Un, the contact between South and North Korea alone would be enough to bring down the Kim Jong-Un regime.

    Are you assuming that the NK leadership’s grip on its military is that tenuous? Would they really abandon Kim Jong Un at the sight of a juicy VIPS steak? Couldn’t he still shower them with all sorts of gifts, and give them all sorts of power, to keep them happy?

    Would a crime family just dissolve, at the sight of such bounty as South Korea? Wouldn’t there just be a whole lot more stuff to divide between themselves?

  • Charles Tilly

    News flash, motherfuckers: North Korea Agrees to Curb Nuclear Work; U.S. Offers Aid

    I report, you decide.

  • CactusMcHarris

    #21,

    I’m glad to be seeing that love from you, CT sshi.

    That was reported on CBC earlier today, with my wife hearing me groan and say ‘Not again! – we’re going to get chumped.’ But I suppose if they’re sincerely trying, we’ve got to give them some carrot – the question is, of course, are they sincere?

  • Charles Tilly

    But I suppose if they’re sincerely trying, we’ve got to give them some carrot – the question is, of course, are they sincere?

    I guess we’ll find out. Or “re-find out.”

  • jk6411

    #21,

    (yawnnn)
    Same old, same old..

  • slim

    Thank you for calling the DPRK.
    Press 1 for Racketeering.
    Press 2 for Rocketeering.
    Press 3 to hear our menu again.

  • CactusMcHarris

    #25,

    That’s funny, sir.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Food and monetary aid is fungible.

    Good use of the word “fungible”.

  • babotaengi

    In the words of the great GWB, “Fool me once, shame on you; fool me … uh … you can’t get fooled again!”

  • http://www.san-shin.org sanshinseon

    Every single year, Lucy offers to hold the football so that Charlie Brown can run up and kick it… maybe *this* time she won’t pull it away?