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Open Thread #229

Hope you all have a great weekend….

  • DLBarch

    Dammit, Neff, I was hoping for another historical piece from you this week!

    Damn slacker!

    DLB

  • robert neff

    Actuallythere are several including the two I just put up but – if you have the interest – you can read the role nuts played in the New Years
    http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2012/02/362_104112.html

    Kite wars in the past
    http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2012/02/362_103874.html

    and here
    http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2012/02/362_103566.html

    And then – one that should appeal to the lawyer in you – one of, if not the first, American lawyers in Korea
    http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2012/02/362_104349.html

  • DLBarch

    Yikes! OK, I totally take back the slacker comment. Nice work, as usual.

    DLB

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    Recently came across this beautiful poem by Kim Su-Yeong, written in 1960. This poem was only recently discovered (in 2008), from the files that Kim’s wife kept after the poet passed away in 1968. I have the poem and translation below. Comments on the optimal translation are always welcome.

    김일성 만세
    Long Live Kim Il-Sung

    김일성만세
    Long live Kim Il-Sung
    한국의 언론자유의 출발은 이것을
    The freedom of speech in Korea begins from this
    인정하는 데 있는데
    Recognizing this
    이것만 인정하면 되는데
    Only has to recognize this but
    이것을 인정하지 않는 것이 한국
    Not recognizing this is Korea’s
    언론의 자유라고 조지훈이란
    Freedom of speech, according to Jo Ji-Hoon,
    시인이 우겨대니
    The poet whose insistence
    나는 잠이 올 수밖에
    Puts me to sleep
    ‘김일성만세’
    ‘Long live Kim Il-Sung’
    한국의 언론자유의 출발은 이것을
    The freedom of speech in Korea begins from this
    인정하는 데 있는데
    Recognizing this
    이것만 인정하면 되는데
    Only has to recognize this but
    이것을 인정하지 않는 것이 한국
    Not recognizing this is Korea’s
    정치의 자유라고 장면이란
    Freedom of politics, according to Jang Myeon,
    관리가 우겨대니
    The official whose insistence
    나는 잠이 깰 수밖에
    Keeps me awake

    Interesting how a lot of Koreans still have not moved an inch past the 1960s.

  • CactusMcHarris

    DLB,

    You’re not as fickle as the winds that sail your boat, but, like me, you’re Californian, correct (and have instant gratification as a birthright)?

    TK,

    Thanks for providing the poem and a translation – I’d have been a while longer at it, myself. Am I wrong in thinking it’s not written in poetic language (the verb endings look like regular writing / speech)?

  • DLBarch

    CMcH,

    Yes, guilty as charged…which is why RN’s near-instantaneous posting of additional stories makes the man even more awesome than I had thought before, and that says a lot!

    DLB

  • http://paulhastings.com/ProfessionalDetail.aspx?ProfessionalId=113741 Ryan Russell
  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    Am I wrong in thinking it’s not written in poetic language (the verb endings look like regular writing / speech)?

    You are quite correct. It is written like a regular speech, except that the line breaks are quite disjointed — which was a challenge for translation.

  • df

    From the The Juan MacLean, Happy House…

    one
    two
    three

  • CactusMcHarris

    Another face of the Republican Party. The sheer obnoxiousness isn’t news, of course, but doesn’t he have advisers who can tell him what irony is?

    http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/news/article/2012/02/while-digging-up-1235-acres-for-his-golf-course-donald-trump-says-wind-farms-are-destroying-scotland?cmpid=rss

  • megook

    Hey guise, there are rumors going around that Kim Jong-un has been assassinated: http://the-diplomat.com/the-editor/2012/02/10/is-kim-jong-un-dead/

  • CactusMcHarris

    Dis guise sez so?

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    #10 The Kims are always trying to assassinate each other.

    Kim Jongils younger brother “mysteriously” died when the two Kims were young boys.

    Kim JongUn apparently tried to have Kim JongNam assasinated.

    I would like to see JongNam take revenge and arrange for JongUn’s assassination.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Weird things happening in L.A. – feeding spoonfuls of sperm to students…

    http://tiny.cc/q0t73

    http://tiny.cc/jevt8

  • characteristic

    #4- TK, 1960 (when your “beautiful poem” was written) was only 7 years after fighting ended — you know, that minor event called the Korean War, where nearly 3 million people died, started by you-know-who.

    I know you do not support the person praised in the poem, but censorship – in 1960 – of the contentious phrase repeated in the poem is a tad understandable, to say the least.

  • characteristic

    …which is not to say censorship in the Korea of 2012 should be as restrictive. But that particular poem is probably not the most apt example to cite when criticizing the closed-mindedness of Koreans of today, given the special place KIS, had and has on most sane Koreans’ minds.

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Are there are persons who have been BOTH President AND Prime Minister besides Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin and Kim Il-sung?

    The latter remained in power during the terms of office of six South Korean presidents, ten U.S. presidents, and twenty-one Japanese prime ministers.

  • Seth Gecko

    Weird things happening in L.A. – feeding spoonfuls of sperm to students…

    “Just a spoonful of jism makes the medicine go down!”

    As sung by MaryCherry Poppins and Dick Van Dyke (porn name change unnecessary)

  • http://koreanlanguagenotes.blogspot.com/ gbevers

    There is a rumor Kim Jong-un was assassinated while in Beijing.

    http://security.blogs.cnn.com/2012/02/10/no-evidence-north-korean-leader-is-dead/?hpt=hp_t3

  • engrishteacher

    @4 – Censorship is alive and well in Korea in 2012 just as it was just after the war. The Rodong Shimbun is available for everyone in the free world, except South Koreans. Or what about the recent flap in the Korean Army’s officer corps involving smartphone apps that supposedly took a negative stance on LMB? Censorship is as much a part of life for Koreans as Soju is to the dinner table.

  • Jashin Densetsu
  • Jashin Densetsu

    Maddow Explains How Ron Paul May Be The Current Republican Front Runner In The Presidential Race! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OkN2npJR-4

  • paulhewson
  • keith

    @9 Trump is such an arsehole, I think it is absolutely outrageous that he should be allowed to set foot in Scotland or anywhere in the UK, never mind buy land there. The fact that such a repulsive creature is allowed to live, never mind try and be POTUS, and buy property in the UK is deeply shameful to both the UK and the US. The UK really needs tighter laws to control the sort of scum who want to come into the country.

    Trump represents all that is wrong with the US today, and none of what is good. Some Republicans should be ashamed of themselves for even considering him fit to be their country’s leader.

  • CactusMcHarris

    #22 in
    The fact that such a repulsive creature is allowed to live, never mind try and be POTUS, and buy property in the UK is deeply shameful to both the UK and the US’

    I’d say it speaks to one of our greatest strengths myself.

    I share most of your sentiments re his utter repulsiveness and environmental vacuity, but you don’t want Oswald Mosley and his ilk back.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    #19-20 Jashin Densetsu should change his self-medication levels… ;-)

  • keith

    Obama’s got talent! http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-16650596

    I think he’d be a hoot to take out to a noraebang! He’s got a good voice and I reckon he’s a more talented musician than Clinton with his less than ‘stella’ sax skills.

    Is it it only democrats who have any talent in artistic fields? Ronald Reagan was a rather poor actor, are any of the republicans talented in any? I can’t imagine Newt busting out a tune, Palin making anything other than confused noise, or most other republicans making any sounds other than the nonsense they usually spout.

    Most politicians are only creative with the truth. or with their accounting.

  • paulhewson

    Whitney Houston is dead at 48.

    Wow. I didn’t even know she was sick.

    RIP.

  • paulhewson

    This is how I will remember her.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eH3giaIzONA

  • paulhewson

    Well, there is a lesson to be learned, I think.

    JUST SAY NO!!! To Bobby Brown!!!

    Yeah, yeah……and drugs too!

  • http://dok.do/4aVK41 Year of the Dragon

    Whitney dug her own grave.

    She had Emphysema (an obstructive lung disease) from using too many cigarettes and crack.

    Whitney Houston died suddenly in her room on 11 February 2012 at the age of 48.

    She was found by her bodyguard, Ray J. dead in her room at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.

    Paramedics tried to perform CPR, but were unsuccessful.

    She had been due to attend Clive Davis’s annual pre-Grammy party there that night, with the 54th Grammy Awards taking place at the time.

  • Jashin Densetsu

    This is why Ron Paul will WIN! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_Iji3xF0e4

    he’s picking up the delegates.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    Great Asian-American NBA player proves to Kobe Bryant that the Jeremy Lin Show is a reality show!

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • jkitchstk

    # 27,
    This is how others will, “Whitney Houston can’t sing at all”(1.25 sec. she looks up and wishes?)…
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWzqlx_8PGo&feature=related

  • RolyPoly

    Brezinski is asking the same question that I have been posing.
    http://news.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2012/02/10/2012021001709.html?news_Head1

    The answer? Korea will move toward the Great Chinese Empire and thereby dig its own grave. China will take Korean wealth; they are poor bastards.

    Koreans will wind up in concentration camps near Tibet, learning Chinese history and Chinese language. No Korean nothing will be allowed.

  • Avaast

    @31

    My TwitFace sphere has been totally overrun by the Jeremy Lin show – the mere mention of basketball usually makes me twitch, but it’s nice to see the Asian-American/Canadian community embrace him like this. He seems like a nice, well-rounded kid and I hope that he continues to do well, although I can’t pretend that I’ll be able to summon enough interest in basketball to check on his progress. Apparently he has a habit of frequently mentioning his love for the Ever-living Lamb to his teammates – I suppose we can’t all be perfect :)

  • CactusMcHarris

    #31 and #34,

    Who knew that that was what the Knicks needed all along? I’ve been following it on Deadspin and it’s a great story. Anything that helps the New York basketball team in the NBA (where they’ve been so terrible for so many years and spent so much money fruitlessly) is OK, and it has a Asian connection? Bonus.

  • CactusMcHarris

    And that didn’t take long, but it’s rather creative, in a yellow-journalism sort of way.

    http://deadspin.com/5884362/this-knicks-fans-me-love-you-lin-time-sign-presented-without-comment

  • Charles Tilly

    Re Linsanity:

    I’ve been following it…and it’s a great story.

    No doubt. The very reason why I try and stay tuned into sports. Great story aside, can it last? Nate Silver-a guy who knows a thing or two and -says it will.

    As someone who doesn’t follow basketball all that much, just curious as to what some of MH’s resident basketball geeks have to say on the matter. I know they know a thing or two as well. Would love to hear their take.

  • dogbertt

    Once again we have the spectacle of the Chav pontificating about all that is wrong with the U.S.

    Sorry, guvnor, but the sun set on the pink portions of the map decades ago. Worry about your own sorry spectacle of a “royal” family and don’t worry about Donald Trump.

    Hey, at least Trump can afford to berth his yachts.

  • Arghaeri

    Maybe, if the americans didn’t think that a korean oriented blog was the place to discuss all their crap about american politics then chav’s from england wouldn’tthink it was the place for their two pennies worth.

    And since when was their a danger of the the brit royal family running for supreme leader, they haven’t even run their own country for several hundred years.

  • Arghaeri

    Perhaps you should worry anout your own sorry spectacle of the Kardashians :-)

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    As someone who doesn’t follow basketball all that much, just curious as to what some of MH’s resident basketball geeks have to say on the matter.

    Lin is playing in a system that makes just about any B+ passing PG into a superstar. Chris Duhon, a thoroughly unimpressive PG, averaged 11 points and 7 assists during his year with the Knicks. Lin is better than Duhon, but over the course of the season, he probably will not average 20+ points and 7+ assists that he has been averaging in the last 5 games. This is especially so if Carmelo (a world class ball stopper) comes back. By then, Lin would settle into something like 15 ppg, 7 apg per night. Lin also needs to cut down his turnovers significantly. It also does not help that Baron Davis still might have something left and takes away Lin’s playing time.

    That said, I love watching Lin because there is a lot to like. He is on the big side for a PG, looks to pass first, knocks down open shots and takes over games without overdoing it. He has a tiny bit of Manu Ginobili in him, in that he keeps his dribble alive and has an array of herky-jerky, Euro-step moves. He will never be a Steve Nash (no one will be,) but his ceiling is high enough that he might make an All-Star if there is a down year for PG. Not so far-fetched if Deron Williams gets traded to Dallas (apparently a likely scenario) and Rajon Rondo continues to stink up the joint.

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    Americans love the discovery of an unheralded star, especially a modest Christian one. It’s early going yet, but Jeremy Lin looks as if he could be another Kurt Warner story. I hope Dancing With The Stars can work with Lin’s schedule.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Professional journalists making me feel better about my comment section:

    http://bayarea.sbnation.com/2012/2/11/2791353/jason-whitlock-racist-tweet-jeremy-lin

  • paulhewson
  • paulhewson
  • http://www.cfekorea.com nayaCasey

    thekorean #43–I was a sports reporter at Harvard, I was the basketball beat reporter for two years, I even got out and played against some of the varsity players in pickup games. I have been following Harvard basketball for more than 2 decades, Harvard WHRB radio still has a listener in South Korea when Harvard football and basketball are on.

    I have been following Lin since his freshman year at Harvard. If you check Lin’s stats at Harvard, he was all over the board (rebounds, assists, steals, blocked shots, and great shooting percentage, the leading scorer his last three years). But…Ivy League. Whereas his teammates seemed to disappear in games against top teams, Lin stepped up his game.

    Still, it is absolutely shocking to me to see him doing this well. I suspect that either his teammates and coaches couldn’t believe he was that good or that it took the team hitting rock bottom for them to turn him loose. Just a short time ago he was back in the Development League. Last month I was still arguing that Lin just needs some minutes (there was a blogger who said Lin should get more minutes, sounded crazy), some friends were still saying he should come to Asia and be a star here rather than hanging on in the NBA and Developmental League.

    Yes, I sent an email, “How you like him now?” 15 points and 7 assists a night sounds spectacular for a Harvard geek who went undrafted, I’m not sure who besides Lin, his family, and some real statistical geeks would have predicted that for him even just a few weeks ago. No one else was able to get it done for the Knicks at PG even though people are now saying it is a PG friendly system (but, apparently, only friendly to Lin this year). I like the argument about it being so friendly, I’d be willing to take the league minimum and I’m sure I could do at least 8 points and 4 assists (along with 12 turnovers) a night.

    Kobe Bryant showed himself, as usual, to be an ass with his dismissive comments of Lin, but there is something to what he said and what you are saying about Lin coming back down to earth. As many players will tell you, once opponents have tape on you, track your tendencies, the challenge is to be able to kick it to the next level when opponents focus on you. Last week, teams were daring Lin to beat them. Now they know he can do it, so they’ll play him differently.

    There are many players who have had good stretches or incredible games (who can forget the stretch LaBradford Smith went through in the early 90s, including one night where he put 37 on Michael Jordan in a spectacular shooting display, but he was out of the league a season later and playing in Europe, although he was a first-rounder). I have many other examples of such players.

    By the way, I greatly regret that I killed the Harvard sports blog I started about four years ago, I would probably be getting 1 million hits a day related to Lin.

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    TK had a reasonable analysis until the All-Star comment. The only way Lin will ever make an All-Star team is if he’s voted in by a billions of Chinese, the way Yao Ming was in his rookie year when it was completely undeserved.

    Of course it’s a feel-good story and from all indications, it couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy. But context is everything, and the context of his great run of games is that he’s playing heavy minutes for a bad team with an up-tempo offense (more possessions and more opportunity to run up stats), injuries to its stars and thus no other offensive options so he can jack as many shots as he wants. Equally as important, 4 of those 5 games were against bad teams with awful defenses (save the Lakers). You could throw just about any backup PG in the NBA into that scenario and expect similar individual stats (although not necessarily similar results for the Knicks). Of course Lin took advantage and made the most of his opportunity, and deserves credit for that, but once the schedule gets tougher, you won’t see him on the front page of the New York Post. Luckily for him, the Knicks next 3 games are against more cupcakes so he may well get another week of media love and Linsanity.

    Additionally, once Amare and Carmelo return to the lineup, his numbers and team role will take a hit. Both of them are stat-centered “superstars” whose paychecks and egos require them to dominate the ball and the offense. They’re not going to concede to Lin and turn the team over, no way, no how. Once Baron Davis is in shape, Lin’s numbers and minutes will take another hit. In fact, Jeremy Lin stock isn’t ever going to be as high as it is now, so if you picked him up off the waiver wire in your fantasy league, it’s time to pawn him off at an inflated price, preferably to the sucker in your league who buys the hype and actually believes he has All-Star potential.

    From a pure talent perspective, he’s an excellent passer, avg shooter, below avg penetrator and finisher, below avg defender (though defense is not really relevant playing for D’Antoni). That makes him roughly the same as about 150 other guards in the NBA, all gunning for the same job. It’s also criminally unfair to him to put his name alongside Iverson/Shaq/Jordan/etc (as the media has done) with ridiculous stats comparing numbers in the first four NBA starts. Making those comparisons serves nothing but sensationalism, because in pure basketball terms it’s beyond absurd.

    The one factor that separates the wheat from the chaff in the NBA is consistency. The league is littered with the corpses of streaky players that put up a couple big nights and then disappear for weeks on end and find themselves glued to the bench or doing mop-up duty in blowouts. Your All-Stars and elite players are on top because they put up those numbers night in and night out over the entire season, against the good teams and the bad, and they’re talented enough to react to the adjustments that defenses make to exploit their weaknesses.

    Bottom line is that there’s a reason Lin sat on the bench in Golden State, was released by Houston, and sat on the Knicks bench. It wasn’t for any reason other than that he wasn’t reliable or consistent enough in practice to merit playing time in games. That hasn’t changed, and his insertion in the lineup was out of desperation due to injuries. Good for him for thriving in that role, but the reality is that Jeremy Lin is simply not talented enough at this stage to be this consistently good throughout an entire season (or even an entire month). If he works his ass off, gets the minutes, and progresses…I think his ceiling is still limited to solid backup PG along the lines of an Eric Maynor/Steve Blake/Daniel Gibson. That’s a significant upgrade from his previous 12th man on a 12-man roster slot, and certainly nothing to be ashamed of.

    All hope is not lost though. Perhaps the Heavenly Father will intervene on behalf of one of his sheep (as he did for Tebow) and magically transform mediocrity into divine superstardom, thus rewarding his “modest Christianity” and simultaneously punishing all those non-believing apostates who shall remain losers.

    Wet Blanket, out.

  • dogbertt

    @41: Don’t blame me that the politics of any Commonwealth country are about as exciting as a bucket of warm spit and don’t exactly provoke heated discussion, Boris Whats-is-name notwithstanding.

  • creggio

    I’m not sure who besides Lin, his family, and some real statistical geeks would have predicted that for him even just a few weeks ago.

    There’s a basketball analyst who predicted a couple years ago that Lin might surprise people and do pretty well.

    http://hoopsanalyst.com/blog/?p=487

    Any team looking to find a starting PG in the 2010 NBA draft had best win the lottery and get the top pick. A year after the legendary PG draft of 2009, the pickings for playmakers are going to be thin. That doesn’t mean there won’t be a player or two who surprise the experts though.

    The best candidate to pull off such a surprise might be Harvard’s Jeremy Lin. The reason is two numbers Lin posted, 2-point FG pct and RSB40. Lin was at .598 and 9.7.

  • http://www.cfekorea.com nayaCasey

    Creggio #51, right, that’s the main analyst I was referring to when I mentioned “real statistical geeks.” Check out his statistics at Harvard, he was a great all-around player, but within the structure of the offense Harvard runs, there aren’t many players who score a lot of points. He never averaged more than 18 points per game in a season at Harvard, I don’t believe he ever scored more than 30 points in a single game, didn’t even lead the Ivy League in scoring.

    Based on what Lin did last year in garbage time and up to his first extended playing time, there weren’t many people predicting he would thrive. There’s also a Yahoo blogger who a few days before Lin had his breakout game suggested that Lin had shown enough development that he should be given more minutes.

  • Arghaeri

    #50 I’m not blaming you for the state of commonwealth politics Dogbertt, indeed I had no idea you wielded such influence over them.

    I am however for free speech, and if crap american politics is gonna be a standard here, then don’t shout out anyone non-american just for being non-american.

    After all as “bleeder of the free world” who get’s the job is of interest to non-americans too.

  • keith

    Who is the Chav? Have I missed something?

  • creggio

    You could throw just about any backup PG in the NBA into that scenario and expect similar individual stats (although not necessarily similar results for the Knicks).

    Any backup PG might do pretty well in that scenario, but those stats actually aren’t that common.

    Apparently his 89 pts over his first 3 starts were the most by a player since the ABA-NBA merger in 1976, and the most period since Atlanta’s John Drew scored 97 in his first 3 starts in 1974.

    And his streak of pts, assists, and FG% hasn’t been that common.

    http://fivethirtyeight.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/11/jeremy-lin-is-no-fluke/

    The New York Knicks’ Jeremy Lin has scored at least 23 points in each of his last four games, including 38 on Friday night against the Lakers. He has also recorded at least seven assists in each game, and he has been efficient, shooting at least 53 percent from the field each time.

    Just how common is something like this? I searched basketball-reference.com for other streaks that were in the same general ballpark: players who scored at least 20 points, had at least six assists and shot 50 percent over a period of four consecutive N.B.A. regular season games.

    Since the 1985-86 season, 41 players have had such a streak in addition to Lin.

    It is an extremely impressive list. All but seven of the players made at least one All-Star appearance in their careers, with about two-thirds of them selected to the All-Star team multiple times. The list includes nine Hall of Famers — and a number of other players who are sure to make it once they retire. The players on the list account for 17 of the last 28 M.V.P. awards.

  • hamel

    keith, me old China: When dogbertt addresses an English commenter or issue he likes to throw in some items of slang from Old Blitey to show that he can talk proper like. I am not always sure that he has his socio-economic grouping right when he refers to “chavs,” though.

  • YangachiBastardo

    Baron Davis, Jeremy Lin, Carmelo Anthony, Manu Ginobili, Deron Williams, Rajon Rondo…

    Hey i can’t tell basketball from dodgeball and i’m not even sure i care but fuck those NBA stars have names that are cool as hell

    (not being facetious here)

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    Any backup PG might do pretty well in that scenario, but those stats actually aren’t that common.

    Apparently his 89 pts over his first 3 starts were the most by a player since the ABA-NBA merger in 1976, and the most period since Atlanta’s John Drew scored 97 in his first 3 starts in 1974.

    And his streak of pts, assists, and FG% hasn’t been that common.

    The biggest reason the stats look exceptional is because of the inclusion of “starts” as the metric. Using the first X starts dramatically narrows the statistical range to compare it to, because 99% of the comparables are going to be either top draft-pick rookies who come in and start immediately, or guys that have been in the league coming off the bench and then get their first chance to start sometime later in their career.

    In both of those situations which are the norm in a first starts scenario, the young player starting is not going to be the focus of the offense, with free reign to put up 20 shots a night, in an un-tempo offense with the team’s 2 best players injured. 99.99% of all the players who ever made their first 3 starts in the NBA were not given those massive advantages on a platter like Lin was. While it makes good print and is good fun for sensationalistic reasons to see his name along side great players who had great CAREERS as opposed to a stretch of a few games, it’s fucking ridiculous to extrapolate anything meaningful from it yet.

    Yes, he’s had a great stretch of 4.5 games (he was dreadful in the second half of his last game, going 1-13 from the field), but if you actually know anything about the NBA and you pay attention to the circumstances in which he achieved those, you would know that it really doesn’t mean all that much outside of a good week of basketball from a nice Asian kid against mostly crap competition. His race is certainly 95% of the story, (Harvard being the other 5%) because of the lack of Asian guards who’ve had success in the NBA. If a black point guard put up the exact same numbers in the exact same scenario and got the Knicks 5 wins, you’d see about 2% of the media coverage you’re seeing for Lin. If white, 25%. If white and Christian, 50%.

    It’s called perspective. Try a splash on your Linsanity salad sometime. Or just wait until he has another 15-20 games under his belt and come back with historical stat comparisons when they’re actually semi-useful.

  • slim

    I trust you’ve recovered from Girls Generation’s conquering of America, IHBB.

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    I trust you’ve recovered from Girls Generation’s conquering of America, IHBB.

    I was in the front row at their Letterman appearance, waving my balloon.

  • creggio

    I’m not Asian and I don’t have “Linsanity”. I agree that race is the major element of this story. I don’t know who denies this.

    I wasn’t trying to extrapolate anything meaningful from the stats or make any predictions about his career.

    I was just disputing your suggestion that his stats aren’t unusual. His streak of pts, assists, and FG% hasn’t been that common. Most of the players who have pulled off a similar streak have been good to all-time great players.

    His FG% dropped below 50% in his 5th game, so that streak ended at 4 games. But he did manage to score 20 pts and had 8 assists. So the streak of scoring at least 20 pts and having at least 6 assists has been 5 games. Those have been his first 5 games as a starter, and apparently as far as that goes he’s number one in recent NBA history, beating out Allen Iverson.

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    I was just disputing your suggestion that his stats aren’t unusual.

    I didn’t claim the stats weren’t unusual. I said that the circumstances that he compiled them in were what was unusual, and that there were numerous other backup PGs around the league who could have put up similar numbers if placed in that same circumstance.

    Of course there’s no way to test that hypothesis, so I’m just going on my general NBA knowledge and having seen scores of flash-in-the-pan types fizzle after a couple weeks when teams adjusted and the reality of playing every night for 38 minutes sunk in and the reasons why the bench guy was a bench buy started to surface.

    If I’m wrong about Lin, I’ll be glad to eat crow.

  • αβγδε

    I often listen to the radio. I thought Mr. Know It All was a song sang by Pink. To my suprise, as I found out, it’s a song sang by Kelly Clarkson. Love the voice for its timbre (even though it can be replaced by Pink’s voice) and love the singing in this song with its tiny nuances here and there of vibrato.

    I was never a fan of Houston’s voice. She could sing- better than anyone- and far better than most of her songs required. Kind of like overkill. But I was never drawn to her voice. When singing is beautiful not merely because it has range and the prowess to clearly produce the musical tones of a song, but because the voice itself has a special, ineffable quality to it, that’s something I have never found in Houston’s voice. But perhaps that’s just my taste.

    A great singer and cultural icon. I was saddened and suprised, even, by the news of her death. Also surpised to learn that she was only 48. Geez. Sometimes I think times flies by too fast. But then Whitney dies and she’s not even 50 years old. RIP.

  • creggio

    Of course there’s no way to test that hypothesis, so I’m just going on my general NBA knowledge and having seen scores of flash-in-the-pan types fizzle after a couple weeks when teams adjusted and the reality of playing every night for 38 minutes sunk in and the reasons why the bench guy was a bench buy started to surface.

    General NBA knowledge and how well he does in any future games has no real bearing on the hypothesis that most backup PGs would have similar stats in similar circumstances. You’d have to look at historical data or at other backup PGs in similar situations in the future.

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    General NBA knowledge and how well he does in any future games has no real bearing on the hypothesis that most backup PGs would have similar stats in similar circumstances. You’d have to look at historical data or at other backup PGs in similar situations in the future.

    General NBA knowledge does, seeing as how it’s virtually impossible to find reliable data points on the exact rare scenario he inherited, so we’re left with informed opinion, which is all I was throwing out. Having seen thousands of NBA games over the last few decades, and in particular having watched loads of D’Antoni coached teams well enough to know what kind of players can put up those kind of numbers in his system (particularly against bad teams), I have a good idea of how his numbers compare in those circumstances relative to the norm, and that’s what I’m basing it on.

  • creggio

    I’ve watched lots of games as well. So have lots of other people.

    If the “exact rare scenario” can’t be found, similar or equivalents could be to try to get some numbers on the situation, otherwise we’re just left with claims backed by nothing other than assertions of hours of TV watching.

  • creggio

    he’s playing heavy minutes for a bad team with an up-tempo offense (more possessions and more opportunity to run up stats), injuries to its stars and thus no other offensive options so he can jack as many shots as he wants. Equally as important, 4 of those 5 games were against bad teams with awful defenses

    The “jack as many shots as he wants” doesn’t really apply because a component of the streak is high FG% (>50%) i.e. efficiency.

    The rest can be quantified as minutes, possessions, opponents’ pts. allowed per game (bad defenses).

    This scenario doesn’t seem that unusual. The set of players who have ever been in this scenario i.e. played heavy minutes on teams that averaged high possessions per game against teams with high allowed pts. per game for multiple games in a row is probably pretty large.

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    If the “exact rare scenario” can’t be found, similar or equivalents could be to try to get some numbers on the situation, otherwise we’re just left with claims backed by nothing other than assertions of hours of TV watching.

    Never claimed it was anything else.

    The “jack as many shots as he wants” doesn’t really apply because a component of the streak is high FG% (>50%) i.e. efficiency.

    A PG in control of the offense and given free reign has far more offensive opportunities and can rack up points/assists easier relative to other positions. It certainly applies, but is partially offset by including FG%.

    This scenario doesn’t seem that unusual. The set of players who have ever been in this scenario i.e. played heavy minutes on teams that averaged high possessions per game against teams with high allowed pts. per game for multiple games in a row is probably pretty large.

    That scenario is not all that unusual. But when you add all the above limiting factors, PLUS the fact that his teams two leading scorers and shot volume leaders were out of the lineup, and then further limit it to players making their first NBA starts for that stretch, it becomes extremely unusual.

    The majority of comparisons made in the media (like the one you used at 55) in the last week have used the “first X starts” metric because it is the most limiting and puts his name alongside hall of famers, which draws the oohs and aahs they’re looking for while giving the false impression that Lin belongs in that company. He doesn’t. I’m sure time will prove that.

    I’m still puzzled as to what your point is if you’re not trying to “extrapolate anything meaningful from the stats or make any predictions about his career.” Why post comparisons and link to others if there’s no meaning or relevance behind them? Clearly the raw stats speak for themselves and there’s no arguing them on their own. The only interesting aspect of them is trying to decipher what they mean in context and if they’re relevant in forecasting his future. Why even bring them up without any larger point, context, or predictive value?

  • creggio

    It certainly applies, but is partially offset by including FG%.

    I don’t think it applies. Jacking up as many shots as one wants implies inefficient possessions. A player posting a high FG% is by definition being very efficient.

    That scenario is not all that unusual.

    If this scenario, which is similar to the one in question, is not all that unusual, then we should see many examples of players posting similar stats according to your claim.

    then further limit it to players making their first NBA starts for that stretch

    This isn’t relevant because your claim was about any backup PG, not backup PGs making their first NBA starts for a stretch.

    The majority of comparisons made in the media (like the one you used at 55) in the last week have used the “first X starts” metric

    The link at 55 is not about using the “first X starts” metric. It’s simply about players with 20+ pts, 6+ assists and 50%+ shooting in 4 or more consecutive games.

    Why even bring them up without any larger point, context, or predictive value?

    I brought them up to dispute your claim that “any backup PG in the NBA into that scenario and expect similar individual stats”.

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    I don’t think it applies. Jacking up as many shots as one wants implies inefficient possessions. A player posting a high FG% is by definition being very efficient.

    It doesn’t imply inefficient possessions. It implies abnormal offensive freedom born of desperation from D’Antoni and an inordinate opportunity to compile stats due to the absence of teammates who normally carry the offensive load. When Carmelo and Amare return, THAT DISAPPEARS, and his shots, points, and minutes drop. If Baron return, they drop further. The reason it’s important in regards to Lin is because the stats are 95% reliant on the situation, and that situation of 20+ shots, being the primary offensive option, and playing 40 minutes per night won’t last, and neither will the stats that resulted from it.

    It was a short term phenomenon without the possibility of sustaining. As such, it’s largely uninteresting and insignificant from either a statistical or basketball standpoint. But of course it’s hugely interesting from a media view of trying to push the egghead Asian kid makes good against all blacks odds. I get it, it sells papers and baits those people ignorant of the context into putting Lin’s name next to Jordan and Shaq and John Drew. Mission accomplished in placing unrealistic expectations on a bench guy that will never ever come close to living up to them.

    What is interesting and significant is whether he’s talented enough to be a good PG and put up good stats over a longer period and without the short term situational advantages he had. But you seem to be afraid to put forth any opinion on that subject, much like most of the media tools who are afraid to rain on the parade of the Harvard boy who loves jeebus, and instead will continue lifting him up to absurd heights so that the crash will be all the more spectacular.

    The link at 55 is not about using the “first X starts” metric. It’s simply about players with 20+ pts, 6+ assists and 50%+ shooting in 4 or more consecutive games.

    I wasn’t talking about the 538 link. I was referring to the John Drew ABA stat you put in the same post:

    Apparently his 89 pts over his first 3 starts were the most by a player since the ABA-NBA merger in 1976, and the most period since Atlanta’s John Drew scored 97 in his first 3 starts in 1974.

    I did see the 538 post, and using a short burst of consecutive games over a specified stat level is of very limited use for the simple reason that averages over time are far more important. Limiting the data range to short streaks of consecutive games tells you very little about a player except how hot he got for 4 games. With Lin he has little else to use so it’s defensible to throw on a blog post. It’s just not relevant to much of anything.

    I brought them up to dispute your claim that “any backup PG in the NBA into that scenario and expect similar individual stats”.

    It’s an opinion based on my knowlege of the NBA. Unless you’ve got access to the STATS Inc database, neither of us is going to be able to find stats similar enough to be useful or relevant to that opinion. You disagree with my opinion, I get it already. I never claimed to have stats to back it up and you can’t possibly come up with any to disprove it. Let it go.

  • creggio

    It doesn’t imply inefficient possessions.

    It does imply inefficient possessions. A high FG% means that the player isn’t “jacking up as many shots as one wants” but is taking the shots that should be taken by definition.

    The reason it’s important in regards to Lin is because the stats are 95% reliant on the situation

    We already went over this. We should see many examples of players posting similar stats according to your claim since similar situations aren’t all that unusual.

    As such, it’s largely uninteresting and insignificant from either a statistical or basketball standpoint.

    The data at the link at 55 suggests that it’s not statistically insignificant.

    But you seem to be afraid to put forth any opinion on that subject

    I engaged you to dispute your claim that “any backup PG in the NBA into that scenario and expect similar individual stats”.

    Limiting the data range to short streaks of consecutive games tells you very little about a player except how hot he got for 4 games.

    It tells you how many times such a thing has happened and provides some information about how likely it might be, which is what this dispute is about, not about how he might do in the future. He could be hit by a bus tomorrow and it would have no bearing on the dispute.

    neither of us is going to be able to find stats similar enough to be useful or relevant to that opinion.

    We have stats regarding how many times it has happened at the link in 55. This is useful and relevant to the dispute because your claim is that backup PGs in similar situations would have similar stats that is the conditional probability is close to 1. You agreed at 68 that similar scenarios aren’t that unusual. If they aren’t that unusual, then according to your claim there should be many examples of similar stats.

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    Yeah, the NYT article linked @55 was the reason why I thought Lin had a ceiling of making All-Star in a down year for PG. As of now, being a Steve Blake/Eric Maynor/Boobie Gibson appears to be the most likely course for Lin, not the ceiling.

  • http://www.cfekorea.com nayaCasey

    The people who are predicting that Jeremy Lin will be mediocre may be right and are on safe ground. The fans in Minnesota were already chanting “over-rated” when he had a bad second half (of a 20 point, 8 assist night, 8 of 24 shooting in the NBA is not a rare occurrence).

    Lin couldn’t get an athletic scholarship out of high school, he was a backup as a freshman at Harvard, very good but not great college player, went undrafted by the NBA, free agent who rode the bench his rookie year (only played 29 games, couldn’t even push past Acie Law to get more playing time, cut by two different teams. A week ago, he was unknown. Now he is known all around the world. He’s on the cover of Sports Illustrated, first player named both Player of the Week awards in the NBA and NBA Development League, his “brand” is now worth $14 million (in Kobe’s range), ticket prices are up because of him, the team is scoring 5 more points per game with him in the lineup, . That “stats-friendly” offense was unfriendly to other PGs for New York this year.

    Opponents will play him differently, players now must respect his game because they don’t want to help build his reputation. Perhaps he has just gotten lucky and isn’t really that good. Anyway, it is fantastic to see, there are some undraftedplayers who achieve some success in the NBA but it isn’t common for one to dominate as Lin has. There was nothing in Lin’s past to suggest he would even stay in the NBA long enough to have a cup of coffee, much less have several good games, including putting 38 points on the Lakers with Kobe and company ready to shut him down.

  • http://www.cfekorea.com nayaCasey

    Here’s a backgrounder I’ve put together on Jeremy Lin’s career at Harvard:

    Freshman: Ever heard of Jim Goffredo? Drew Housman? Andrew Pusar? Dan McGeary? They were the guards on the Harvard 2006-07 men’s basketball team who played more minutes than Jeremy Lin did that year. Goffredo (a 6-3 senior) was the starting shooting guard (15.4 PPG), Housman (a 6-0 sophomore) was the starting point guard (13.2 PPG), the third guard in Harvard’s lineup, Pusar (a rugged 6-2 sophomore) scored 5.7 ppg in 20 minutes a game. Another freshman, McGeary (6-1), played more minutes than Lin and scored more points (5.3 PPG in 20 minutes per game). The team’s leading scorer was 7-0 center Brian Cusworth, 17.4 ppg, although he only played 18 games because his eligibility had expired, and 6-9 sophomore Evan Harris (10.4 ppg) were the big men in the starting lineup.

    Analysis: So as a freshman, Lin couldn’t crack the starting lineup. In Harvard’s 3 guard lineup, Lin played the fifth most minutes of the 6 guards who played regularly. Lin only shot 41 percent from the field, averaged less than 5 points in 18 minutes per game, and the former NBA Knicks star didn’t do anything to distinguish himself on an Ivy League team that finished 12-16.

    Sophomore: Former Duke University star Tommy Amaker took over as coach. Harvard continued with its three guard lineup. With the graduation of Goffredo, Lin moved into the starting shooting guard spot. Housman (junior, 10.6 PPG, starting point guard) and Pusar (junior, 8.1 PPG, 6-2 swingman known for his defense) were the other starting guards. McGeary, who played more than Lin as a freshman, continued coming off the bench as a sophomore, averaging 7.3 PPG. The former Knicks star was second-team all-Ivy. 6-9 junior Evan Harris (10.7 ppg), 6-7 sophomore Magnarelli (10.8 ppg) and 6-8 senior Unger were the big men.

    Analysis: Lin was the leading scorer on a bad team (8-22 overall). He didn’t score (12.6 PPG) as much as Goffredo had (15.4 PPG), but he was a better all around player, averaging almost 5 rebounds and 3.6 assists per game. Lin led the team in steals, assists, steals, was third in blocked shots (0.6 per game, a high number for a guard). He shot 44 percent from the field, but was mediocre from three point range (28%) and the free throw line (62%). He shot more three pointers per game (3.5) than free throws (2.9), indicating he was relying on his bad jump shot and was shooting long shots because the team was usually trailing.

    Junior: Harvard had one of its best seasons in years, finishing at .500 with a 14-14 record. This was also one of Harvard’s most experienced teams in years, with three seniors and three juniors among its regulars. The other guards were 6-2 senior Pusar (6.4 ppg) and 6-0 senior PG Housman (9.6 ppg). Lin led the team in scoring at 17.8 PPG–the only Harvard player to average in double figures. He was the unquestioned leader as the team greatly improved. The big men struggled that year with injuries, especially with 6-9 sr Harris (5.0 ppg). 6-8 freshman Wright (8.0 ppg) and 6-7 junior Miller (6.1 ppg) and 6-6 freshman Boehm (6.1 ppg) played more minutes than expected.

    Analysis: Lin greatly improved from his sophomore year. He averaged 17.8 PPG, shot 50.2% from the field, 40% from three point range, 74% from the free throw line. His stat line was excellent: 5.5 rpg, 4.2 assists, 2.4 steals, 0.6 blocks. He was the only player in the country who ranked in the top 10 in his conference in the top 8 statistical categories. There was even talk about him being Ivy League Player of the Year, he did finish All-Ivy First Team. The team relied on Lin–he also led in turnovers at 3.8 per game. One big change in his game: He shot more free throws (6.0) than three pointers (3.6). He was then known for his aggressive penetrations to the hoop and had some impressive dunks that were passed around on YouTube.

    Senior: Harvard had what was considered to be one of its best recruiting classes ever. Three freshmen bumped other players out of the lineup so they were teaming with Lin and sophomore Wright by the end of the season. Harvard indeed had one of its best seasons ever, finishing 21-8, winning the most games in team history, and making its first tournament appearance since 1945-46. Long-time watchers in Harvard basketball were thrilled by the season although some lamented that Lin was graduating, Amaker had the makings of what appeared to be a great team. They were right, as Harvard tied to win a share of its first Ivy League championship. This year, the team is 21-3, in first place, and has a very good shot at making it to the NCAA tournament.

    Analysis: Lin led the team in scoring for the third straight year and he continued with his all around play while improving his shooting. 16.4 ppg, 4.4 rpg, 4.5 apg, 2.4 steals and 1.1 blocks per game. He shot more free throws (6.8) than three pointers (3.0). With a more talented team, he shot the ball on average less as a senior (9.9 FG attempts per game) than as a sophomore (10.9), but averaged four more points a game and his shooting greatly improved from 44 to 51 percent on FGs overall, from 28 to 34 % on three pointers, from 62 to 75 % on free throws. He was incredible from 2 point range his senior year. Lin was All-Ivy First Team again, but lost out to Ryan Wittman (son of the former NBA player and coach) as Ivy League Player of the Year that year. Wittman is now playing hoops in Poland–and may be getting calls from NBA teams…

    Overall: Lin had a very good college career. He became the first player in Ivy League history to record more than 1,450 points, 450 rebounds, 400 assists and 200 steals. He wasn’t a superstar, he was never a serious candidate for awards outside of the Ivy League. He showed great athleticism, getting some attention with some good games against top competition. He is now playing PG for the Knicks, but at Harvard, he was the shooting guard in a three-guard offense.

    He went undrafted by the NBA, and was unnoticed nationally or internationally until February 2012.

  • http://www.cfekorea.com nayaCasey

    Last-second Lin!
    http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/recap?gid=2012021428

    “Jeremy Lin made a tiebreaking 3-pointer with less than a second to play and the New York Knicks rallied to beat the Toronto Raptors 90-87 Tuesday night, extending their winning streak to six games.”

    First, for his critics. Lin had 8 turnovers. He missed 4 of 11 free throws. He only took two 3-point shots (making both, so why didn’t he shoot more?). And Lin was lucky because Toronto is another bad team he has had the fortune to play against. Oh, and yes, he led another comeback, but why did the team have to come back?

    To everyone else: Lin led the team in scoring with 27 points and 11 assists despite the return of a superstar teammate and hit the game-winning shot of a last-minute comeback. He may eventually come back down to Earth and average 15 points and 7 assists, or he may eventually become the career backup that seemed a pipeline even just a month ago when he wasn’t sure he would get a guaranteed contract. But for now, Wow! The guy is lighting it up in the NBA. There was nothing in his past to suggest he could do this in the NBA.

  • http://bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    There was nothing in Lin’s past to suggest he would even stay in the NBA long enough to have a cup of coffee, much less have several good games, including putting 38 points on the Lakers with Kobe and company ready to shut him down.

    Actually, I’m not so sure about that. If you go back to the college basketball press, there have always been teasers about Lin at Harvard, wondering whether he had the stuff or not. And the Asia’s Finest set have always been boosters of Jeremy Lin, the conquering yellow man. I’m glad for them and for him — Linsanity is as fun as the Hebrew Hammer.

    Maybe NBA teams simply overlook a huge amount of talented people, because their selection criteria are more convenient than effective. That’s surely the case with law firms. Why not the NBA?

  • Jashin Densetsu

    Clear Evidence Republican Party Committing Voter Fraud! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPD-w-wDPVw

  • http://www.cfekorea.com nayaCasey

    Brendon #76, about the first paragraph of your comment, as much as I like Lin, he wasn’t regarded as NBA material by NBA people. There were definitely fans with a connection to him (Harvard, Asian, California) who thought he could make it. He averaged 13 points per game in his Ivy League career with teams that had were 43-44 in the games he started his last three years. There were just the usual teasers about him being a sleeper who could surprise, as there are about so many players, but that was not enough for him to get drafted, to stop him from getting twice, and, as of a month ago, only the die-hards were still talking him up.

    About the second paragraph, I agree about the NBA but have no idea about law firms. There are probably many players sitting on the bench, in the development league, or typing this on a computer in South Korea who today are saying, “All I need is the right situation, I could do a lot of what he is doing.” Players who have played against Lin are probably thinking that if Lin tops out at 15 and 7, that they could probably do 13 and 6, if given a chance.

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    If you go back to the college basketball press, there have always been teasers about Lin at Harvard, wondering whether he had the stuff or not.

    Every college athlete that plays in a lower-level league like the Ivy (or D2/3/NAIA) always faces the question of whether they can replicate that success against top competition. And given that the success rate of athletes coming from lower-level leagues in comparison to D1 is probably 1:100, those questions are absolutely deserved and necessary.

    And the Asia’s Finest set have always been boosters of Jeremy Lin,

    Come on, when you boost every co-ethnic in every arena all the time, you’re bound to be right once in a while. Asia’s Finest also boost Snacky Chan as the next Jay Z, Lee Seung Yeop as the next Barry Bonds, and think Bobby Lee is better than Dave Chappelle. You know that means nothing from the blindly devoted.

    Maybe NBA teams simply overlook a huge amount of talented people, because their selection criteria are more convenient than effective. That’s surely the case with law firms. Why not the NBA?

    No and no. Professional sports teams are probably the least biased of any type of business organization when it comes to issues of race. They want people who can play, and generally don’t give a fuck what you look like while doing so. They scout professional leagues all over the world and go to every corner of the earth in trying to find talent, and there’s no color or race test they administer. They value talent over other external factors so much that they repeatedly give criminals, malcontents, and coach-choking Sprewells second, third, fourth, and fifth opportunities just on the chance that they’ve got something left in the tank. If you can play, someone will give you a chance.

    Not to mention that the NBA has a long-term plan of cultivating China and Asia as a massive and lucrative market for their product, so Lin’s value as a marketing tool probably got him as much or more consideration than any inherent bias against Asian players would have detracted. It’s no coincidence that Golden St has the largest Asian fan base in the NBA, and they were the team to sign him to a contract out of college.

    Of course some scouts and organizations are probably a bit more skeptical of an Asian guard than they would be an equivalently talented black or white one, but that’s to be expected when the number of Asian players to have had any success in the league can be counted on one hand.

    Actually the best indicator that NBA teams will gave Asians a fair shake is the fact that the absolutely worthless Clumsy Fouler Extraordinaire Ha Seung-jin was actually drafted and sat on NBA benches for 2 years, and his skill set included nothing but missing dunks and falling down a lot.

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    Yeah, the NYT article linked @55 was the reason why I thought Lin had a ceiling of making All-Star in a down year for PG. As of now, being a Steve Blake/Eric Maynor/Boobie Gibson appears to be the most likely course for Lin, not the ceiling.

    You’re right, I meant expected level, not ceiling. Those three guys are solid backups, and if given starters minutes can be avg starting PGs. I figured he’d settle into a similar role as those three once BD and Carmelo come back.

  • ecw

    Professional sports teams are probably the least biased of any type of business organization when it comes to issues of race.

    That’s debatable.

    See the Caste Football site: http://www.castefootball.us/about/

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    That’s debatable.

    See the Caste Football site: http://www.castefootball.us/about/

    Thanks for the laugh. Seriously, I encourage everyone to visit that site just to recalibrate the low end of the stupidity bar. I had no idea retarded white supremacists were so wound up about the plight of the white tailback and the massive worldwide conspiracy to keep the poor white athlete down.

    I can’t even imagine what kind of knuckle-dragging goodness occurs in the discussion forums there.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Christ, has it really been a quarter of a century since a whiteboy ran for a 1,000 yards?

  • YangachiBastardo

    As we’re on the subject of sport we have Arsenal fans here today…i gotta head downtown now for really boring shit …hope the lads behave, i DO NOT really wanna do stupid shit but i have really little tolerance, in the mood i am right now, for boorish, loud behaviour.

    Other than that FORZA ARSENAL wipe AC Milan scum off the face of the earth :)

  • ecw

    I encourage everyone to visit that site

    It makes some important points and raises doubts on the idea that pro sports is among the least biased industries. There is plenty of bias and a caste mentality that pigeonholes players.

  • YangachiBastardo

    It makes some important points and raises doubts on the idea that pro sports is among the least biased industries. There is plenty of bias and a caste mentality that pigeonholes players

    Listen now i don’t wanna sound like a jackass or anything but i find the idea of some anti-white racial agenda in pro-sport nothing short of a laughable joke.

    It is possible that pro-teams may be indeed more inclined to hire one race than the other, but if that happens it is for entirely marketing-related reasons.

    If some sport happens to have a huge audience with, say, American blacks, marketing 101 tells you that you wanna seek for black American talent more than, say, lanky, pale Ruassian dudes.

    For the same reason (crackin into the huge, untapped Asian market) havin’ a risin Asian star like Lin is a sheer rain of gold.

    Accusing the NBA, the NFL or whoever to have a racial agenda would be like accusing of racialism the k-pop industry cos well they tend to hire Korean pretty boys&girls (and the occasional Chinese and the occasional Hapa to tap other markets)

  • http://www.cfekorea.com nayaCasey

    Robert #83–Well, Reagan was president then. I was young then but I recall Democrats blaming everything on Reagan–he apparently was slipping out of the White House at night to get black girls pregnant, selling crack in black neighborhoods, and allowing white running backs to run wild…

    ecw #85–The market argument on that point is (not that there is no racism or bias and certainly not something so subjective as pro sports being among the “least” biased industries) that sports teams that discriminate against or pigeonhole players risk playing against those players later. So…how ya feelin’ today, Golden St. Warriors? Houston Rockets? They both had Jeremy Lin, and apparently both are wondering if they let the wrong player get away, having to explain why they didn’t notice his talent or give him a shot. The same with NFL teams that passed on white WR Jordy Nelson of the Green Bay Packers. Was there bias or pigeonholing? Perhaps. But the more important thing is that teams had a chance to draft (or trade for) him, or that Green Bay would have been cheating itself by keeping him on the bench.

  • http://www.wm3.org/Updates iheartblueballs

    It makes some important points and raises doubts on the idea that pro sports is among the least biased industries. There is plenty of bias and a caste mentality that pigeonholes players.

    No, it doesn’t. It takes a result (non-white athletes dominating several professional sports) and attempts to attribute that result to anti-white bias without offering any evidence to back it up except the result itself.

    You could use the formula to claim that the NHL and NASCAR are biased against blacks, which is equally absurd.

    If some sport happens to have a huge audience with, say, American blacks, marketing 101 tells you that you wanna seek for black American talent more than, say, lanky, pale Ruassian dudes.

    This works with players on the fringe and perhaps adding a bench guy to attract a foreign market (like Park Chu-young at Arsenal), but it doesn’t apply on a larger scale. The NBA and NFL both have overwhelmingly white audiences, and if marketing to an audience of the same race were a primary concern to either, the leagues wouldn’t be 75% and 67% black, respectively.

    Teams that prioritize race over talent and winning won’t be able to compete, it’s that simple. In fact, I’d like to see the collective d-bags at Caste Football pool their money, buy themselves an NFL or NBA franchise, stock it with exclusively white players, and put their grand racial bias conspiracy theory to a real world test. It would be more than amusing to watch the winless seasons roll in.

  • YangachiBastardo

    You fuckin’ lowlife English scum…when you will fuckin learn this is not a place where you can behave like jackasses, where you think you are ? In fuckin Cyprus ??

    http://www.lequipe.fr/Football/Actualites/Supporters-incidents-a-milan/263708

    http://milano.corriere.it/milano/notizie/cronaca/12_febbraio_15/tifosi-arsenal-milan-piazza-duomo-tensione-scontri-polizia-1903296658714.shtml

    Don’t complain then if you get hurt, we don’t want your drunk, council house, Ryanair flight asses here.

    STAY THE FUCK HOME, YOU’RE NOT FUCKIN WELCOME, FAT, UGLY FUCKS

    And despite what you may think, WE DO NOT NEED your devalued pounds, bring ‘em to Croatia or Greece or fuckin’ Spain

    Hopefully at least one of you will die tonight

  • CactusMcHarris

    And they question why he has the handle ‘…Bastardo’?

    Ryanair flight asses – that’s good aviation humour there.

  • YangachiBastardo

    cactucs i’m a misanthrope at heart, i particularly hate loud, boorish, visible humanity so English , Spaniards, Eastern Europeans, South Americans, my own country people et al. rank pretty high in my shit list. I get along with Asians well cos well they don’t stir shit, basically they don’t get noticed.

    Despiite popular stereotypes, Arabs are pretty good too: having been raised in a strictly conservative environment they tend to act in a really low-key way.

    Good for my kid i didn’t come across this dirty trash, he doesn’t need a father serving a life sentence

  • YangachiBastardo

    In fact, I’d like to see the collective d-bags at Caste Football pool their money, buy themselves an NFL or NBA franchise, stock it with exclusively white players, and put their grand racial bias conspiracy theory to a real world test. It would be more than amusing to watch the winless seasons roll in

    Point taken, but am i wrong or many white kids (avid merchandise consumers) look up to black stars for what’s cool ?

    Everything else (specifically talent) being equal if you were the general manager of some major NBA franchise, who would you hire ? Carmelo Anthony or some lanky Dorkevitch dude from Serbia ?

    Nothing wrong with that btw

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    I get along with Asians well cos well they don’t stir shit, basically they don’t get noticed.

    I’m with you on that one Yangachi. My neighbourhood has a lot of Korean and Japanese immigrants. It’s safe and quiet and people just get on with their shit. My country ought to be rolling out the red carpet for them.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    On another note, I can’t stand Apple and couldn’t stand Jobs.

    Here’s a guy who said, “Good artists copy, great artists steal” and then goes ahead and authorizes shit like this.

    Suing Kodak? Nice PR move there fellas.

    I really think the only thing Apple has going for it is the fact that none of its competitors an make a simple, clean, well-designed phone. It can’t be that hard. An android OS with iPhone design will destroy all-comers, IMO. Get your shit together Samsung.

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    Href fail.

  • http://www.cfekorea.com nayaCasey

    I just checked the box score of the latest Knicks game, .Halftime, the Knicks are up 54-36. Jeremy Lin has the fortune of playing against yet another bad NBA team.

    For his critics, he has missed half of the four shots he has taken. He has only scored 6 points. He is still bad from the free throw line. He has made only 2 of 3. Even though he was two-for-two on three pointers in the last game, he hasn’t taken any yet.

    For everyone else: He has 9 assists against only one turnover. I checked the play by play–6 of his 9 assists have led to dunks. At that rate, ESPN could have top 10 dunks of the night just from assists by him. As a reminder, Lin wasn’t a point guard in college, so he is switching to a new position, and playing it damn well so far. He is matched up at point guard with Tyreke Evans (6-6 220), the number four pick out of Memphis in 2009 who averages 17 points, 5 assists per game. As a reminder, Lin wasn’t drafted.

  • Jieun K

    they don’t stir shit

    Oh no, they don’t, but upon one helluva condition that:

        · You tune into all of their sensitivities at all times and do not be forthright about any of them regardless of circumstance.

        · Especially, you never say a word about their features ’cause it’s one helluva pet peeve for a helluva lot of ‘em and they sure as hell raise hell about it and forever condemn you as racist.

    ought to be rolling out the red carpet for them.

    See above. And brace yourself while you’re at it.

    Or, you might consider rolling it back in before it’s too late to have a change of heart. MCism—full cousin to PCism—comes with quite a few imperatives, y’know.

  • Jieun K

    one helluva condition

    Okay, make that “two” or whatever if you want to be meticulous.

  • YangachiBastardo

    @ jieun: you should see my current business partner (a guy with 30 years more experience than me), he’s the master of deling with our Korean JV, once during a lunchtime he called Koreans “The Teutons of Asia”, you should have seen the execs chests swelling :)

    I woke up in much more mellow (depressive) mood, if i catch some English dude still left in town i’ll take ‘em out for a drink…today the city seems to be covered in those ugly red and black scarves and flags…somebody put me to sleep, that’s an obscene sight if there ever was one

    Hoju: i share your views about Jobs&Apple, i’m not quite sure about the Android system: full of any possible kind of shit, seems to me it’s turning into the Windows of the mobile world

  • Jieun K

    you should have seen the execs chests swelling

    Ha. Stroke ‘em good should the need arise again.

    depressive

    What you need to be feeling good.

  • Charles Tilly

    A leftist critique of the DUP’s current position on the KORUS FTA.

  • http://www.cfekorea.com nayaCasey

    Jeremy Lin lost his first game as a starter with the Knicks. It is remarkable. Every game he plays in is an event of international interest, with the atmosphere being more like the 7th game of the NBA playoffs. Outlets that don’t cover sports are tracking him. Opposing point guards who were more well-known coming out of high school or college have a chance to build a rep off him. Opposing teams know the whole world is watching them, too, so they may also be playing with more focus than usual. As I expected, the NBA found a way to get him to the All-Star game (Rising stars game, helping his teammate in the dunk competition). They may him selling peanuts, joining the cheerleaders during breaks, giving color analysis during half-time, and a special half-time feature story.

    As for the game, Lin scored 26 points (8 of 18 shooting), 5 assists, 4 steals, but 9 turnovers. As long as the team was winning, people could look past his propensity to toss the ball into the crowd, but the 9 turnovers may give his critics who have been a bit quiet lately some courage. Lin and Stoudamire combined to shoot 20 of 39 from the field, the rest of the team was 11 of 36 shooting. And, despite his turnovers, they had a shot at the end to win.

    The people who note they have been beating bad teams are right, but it is still the NBA and not easy to beat all of the lousy teams, either. Carmelo Anthony should be back soon and the team just signed streaky shooter J.R. Smith so there will be more shooters, a deeper bench. That would mean they would have two bona-fide all-starts (Anthony and Stoudamire), a streaky athletic scorer (Smith) and Lin as offensive weapons who can put up 20 or more on any given night, along with some role players who were playing at a higher level until this loss.

    My guess is that Lin will be going for double-doubles of points and assists while cutting down on turnovers and deferring to his superstar teammates. I do wonder when he will get his first quadruple-double (at least 10 points, 10 rebounds, 10 assists, 10 turnovers).