≡ Menu

What was that? You want to chip in an F-15 or two?

Time to kick the tires and light the fires—the JoongAng Ilbo has given us the green light to wack the Syrians:

Now the international community must persuade and pressure Russia and China to change their actions. If they persist in having their way, the rest of the world must come up with ways to force Assad to step down without the cooperation of Russia and China.

For example, the global community can give positive consideration to the idea of providing weapons to the Syrian rebels. Furthermore, the United States, the EU and Middle Eastern nations should push ahead with air raids on Syrian troops to disrupt their ruthless attacks on civilians, just as the NATO-led alliance did in Libya. Dictators’ atrocities must be stopped. The international community must stand up to a massive anti-humanitarian crime once again.

It’s almost bombs-away at the Kyunghyang, too.

Of course, what I’m NOT hearing is offers to contribute a fighter wing or two to help. Seeing how the “international community” has this great responsibility and all…

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • Wedge

    The world loves using America’s armed forces to solve its problems. Time to end that practice.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    “Of course, what I’m NOT hearing is offers to contribute a fighter wing or two to help.”

    Where would the F-15K’s be stationed? Who’s fuel would they use? Who’s munitions would they use? It’s just so logistically improbable.

    Italian, Greek and Turkish contribution is the most logistically practical.

  • Arghaeri

    Hardly Wangkon. Any base can take them and fuel them. Assuming the turks will provide a base.

    The libya missions were fronted from italian bases, the only logistical difficulty would be in getting them to their destination. Difficult, but far from impossible.

  • characteristic

    “Where would the F-15K’s be stationed? Who’s fuel would they use? Who’s munitions would they use? It’s just so logistically improbable.

    Italian, Greek and Turkish contribution is the most logistically practical.”

    I’m quite sure logistical issues aren’t the only reasons for Korea’s non-contribution… SK has long been unable (or rather unwilling) to do what’s necessary to defend itself, not just from NK but also from its larger neighbors. The only country SK stands up to is the US because they know no real harm will come to them.

  • Granfalloon

    Please understand their special situation.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    “accept the mystery”.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Arghaeri,

    I think the Koreans (and the Americans) are better served if Korea just gives NATO a $check$. It makes little sense to ferry F-15Ks all the way from Northeast Asia to the eastern Mediterranean.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    Hummm… on the flip side…. F-15Ks targeting and taking out Syrian targets would give Korean pilots valuable combat experience given they are on the tip of the spear for potential similar missions against North Korea.

  • DLBarch

    WK eventually gets it @ 8. Logistics is not a problem, especially for an, ahem, country that has no problem at all ferrying all sorts of goods pretty much all over the world.

    But Korea DOES have a problem with an entire officer and NCO corps that completely lacks real combat experience.

    Whether Korea should actually get directly involved in the Syrian civil war is a political decision and an entirely different matter, but if it does, “logistics” (fer-cryin-out-loud!) won’t be a problem.

    DLB

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    DLB,

    F-15Ks and big screen LCD televisions are two very different things from a logistical standpoint.

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    “Whether Korea should actually get directly involved in the Syrian civil war is a political decision and an entirely different matter…”

    That’s why NATO should do it and Korea is not a part of NATO. Thus, diplomatically, it’s more complex for Korea but not as for Turkey, the U.S., France and Italy.

  • DLBarch

    WK @ 10,

    Short memory, brah. Just last week, MH was all over the anticipated sale of South Korean T-50 Golden Eagle training jets to Israel.

    Still a logistical problem? I thought not. Never underestimate Korea’s ability to get pretty much anything from point A to point B.

    (And don’t be so quick to underestimate the ability of Korea’s armed forces to play a meaningful international role commensurate with its standing in the world.)

    Cheers,
    DLB

  • http://www.xanga.com/wangkon936 WangKon936

    DLB,

    There is, yet again, a big difference in shipping product vs. moving combat ready sophisticated jets to different regions halfway around the world. In that case the U.S. is the best nation for that. Their military has been trained and geared for decades to fight conflicts anywhere in the world, with logistical backing. It’s not just the jet, but it’s also the bombs, missiles and fuel that needs to be moved with the jet and most times the logistics far outweigh the weapon platform in what needs to be shipped.

    Having said that, I want Korea to do more and play more of a role in keeping peace and democracy stable in the world and being a better partner for the U.S. and her allies in this endeavor. I do not think sending F-15Ks to the eastern Mediterranean is the best way to do this. Here’s why:

    1) The U.S. and NATO fighter jets practice ground attack drills consistently and have integrated weapons and training. The USAFK and the Korean Air Force probably less so and even less so in a potential conflict over the eastern Mediterranean.

    2) Although the F-15K is an improved variant of the F15E, there are differences. For example, the jammers are Israeli. There are tweaks to the radar too. The F-15K pilots don’t really train in a NATO type command structure unless it’s Red Flag (although I believe they all speak English). I don’t know how much ground attack coordination is emphasized in Red Flag. I think Red Flag is primarily an Air Force dog fighting camp.

    3) F-15K pilots don’t have a lot of training to use some smart munitions that are commonly used by NATO pilots. Although JDAMs are be installed onto F-15Ks, I believe it’s the KF-16 pilots that have first dibs to the stockpiles and training. If this is true, then giving Korean pilots new munitions to use without the proper training will put his life in danger as well as the lives of allied pilots in danger.

    4) The F-15K fleet is limited. I think there is only 40 at this time and more on order. Moving a dozen or so F-15Ks half way around the world will reduce Korea’s F-15 fleet by 30% or more. Not an insignificant amount given that your neighbor is North Korea.

    At the end of the day it would just be more convenient and cheaper for the U.S. to use their own planes and those of their NATO allies than to invite Korean forces to this part of the world. I think if you asked the U.S. Air Force, they would probably prefer Italian Tornado fighter/bombers or Turkish F-16s. In terms of integrated training, familiarity and working within a NATO command structure, it would be a lot simpler.

    The best contribution for Korea would be to send money so the U.S., Italy, Turkey and another other NATO ally can buy more fuel, munitions and spare parts to ensure a successful air campaign.

  • Arghaeri

    I think the Koreans (and the Americans) are better served if Korea just gives NATO a $check$. It makes little sense to ferry F-15Ks all the way from Northeast Asia to the eastern Mediterranean.

    Quite possibly, where did U suggest otherwise. That is not the point “logistically impossible” point which you raised and I rebutted.

    Although in that point
    1) do you seriously think they would even send a check
    2) why not send some pilots too; and
    2) surely it would be better for the US and NATO to send a check to Israel rather than shipping F-15′s and Typhoons all the way to Turkey or Iraq

  • Arghaeri

    F-15Ks and big screen LCD televisions are two very different things from a logistical standpoint.

    How exactly do you work that out?
    Logistics, how do I get A from point 1 to point 2? Answer, put it on a ship! How do you think the f-15′s get to korea in the first place, or for that matter the t-50′s from Korea to Israel.

  • Arghaeri

    That’s why NATO should do it and Korea is not a part of NATO. Thus, diplomatically, it’s more complex for Korea but not as for Turkey, the U.S., France and Italy.

    Eh, politically its easier for Korea. NATO is not a sovereign state its a collective defence organisation, and the North Atlantic collective is under no threat from Syria whatsoever, so how on earth would it be polically easier for NATO.

  • Arghaeri

    Basically, WK to sum up simply your position is the rest of the world should take the load, whilst korea appears neutral, and will follow up with sales of TV’s when its all over.

    You say it doesn’t have the capcity or training, but it never will if it always stands faithfully providing verbal support ten steps back from the actual action.

  • CactusMcHarris

    #15,

    Are you sure about that – wouldn’t the selling party want to assemble them themselves (for warrant purposes), and the planes then get flown to the buyer’s destination?

  • Arghaeri

    Generally, thats between the selling and buying party. Many countries buy and assemble aircraft on license, or have the capability to assemble locally under supervision of the OEM.

    More specifically, with already operational fighter aircraft why would you disassemble it?

    You can ship it, or fly it. The issues with flying off the top of my head would be,
    i) flying an operational combat aircraft over other sovereign states airspace,
    ii) permissions to land and refuel in sovereign airspace, or alternately flying around with inflight refueling!
    iii) all the tons of support equipment, spares, weapons, maintenance, diagnostics etc

    Alternately, I don’t know uf its veen done with f-15′s but I heard of F-18 Hornet’s being transported by Galaxy’s.