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To Foreigners in Korea: Please learn a little Korean

From here:

A video is circulating on the Korean Internet of a black gentleman yelling at and threatening an elderly Korean couple.

His violent behavior was the result of him misunderstanding the elderly man’s comment to him. The elderly man reportedly said  “니가 여기 앉아” (a sign of consideration) but not knowing Korean, the man in question interpreted “니가” as the N-word which led to his violent outburst.

*The video in question is at the bottom of this article. Apparently our culprit learned “개새끼야” but couldn’t be bothered to learn simple pronouns. Definitely North American, but if his hair is any indication he’s definitely not a soldier.

부모님은 참 자랑스러워 하시겠다.

UPDATE (by Robert Koehler): The IBT speculates as to the initial cause of the brouhaha. One netizen who quotes somebody who witnessed the disturbance said the foreigner was on the bus talking with his girlfriend loudly. The old man told him to be quiet, the foreigner didn’t listen, so the old man told him to shut up, and the foreigner responded by saying he knew how to curse in Korean, too.

I have no idea if that’s true, but the scenario is plausible enough, and serves as an opportunity for the second piece of unsolicited advice we at the Marmot’s Hole will proffer today — in addition to learning a bit of Korean, please, for the love of Christ, keep your voices down when speaking English on buses and subways. You might not notice, but your voices carry, and it can be seriously irritating.

And the “Racially Inflammatory Media Quote of the Day” Award goes to New Daily, which quotes one Itaewon resident as saying, “This incident is hardly anything compared to what Itaewon is normally like… In fact, there are a lot of African blacks who disrespect the Korean police and residents in Itaewon.”

UPDATE 2: The Kyunghyang has a bit more detail. The foreigner in question is 24 years old, an American, and an English teacher. The victim was 61. This went down around 11:10pm Saturday on the bus from Moran Station to Bundang. One of the bus passengers called 112 (Five-Oh), and the bus driver stopped the bus in front of a nearby police station, where the foreigner was arrested. After completing their preliminary investigation, the police let the alleged ruffian go, but plan to call him in again tomorrow for further investigation.

Hopefully, he hasn’t pulled a runner already.

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ kuiwon

    Imagine if that black man were in China…

  • dtwSickboy

    Cause it’d be on like Georgetown?

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ kuiwon

    That.. and they use something that sounds similar to the N-word quite often. I think to mean “that.”

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ kuiwon

    That.. and they use something that sounds similar to the N-word quite often. I think to mean “that.”

  • bumfromkorea

    I had a similar (though not as violent and confrontational) experience when I hummed along with Psy’s Champion.

    Champion!
    소리 지르는 니가!
    Champion!
    음악에 미치는 니가!
    Champion!
    인생 즐기는 니가!
    Champion!
    니가!
    Champion!
    니가!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTT9MT0rMhU

  • http://www.chiamattt.com chiamattt

    I wonder if that fucking idiot apologized when it was explained to him that it was a misunderstanding.

  • cmm

    What a shameful display, though perhaps if it wasn’t pixelated it might have been less shameful if we could “see [those] rocks.” I bet there were some terrified people on that train. What a colossal douche.

  • http://roboseyo.blogspot.com roboseyo

    I also had a friend who thought the Psy lyric was repeating the “n” word.

  • robert neff

    what a dumbazz

  • http://www.bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    Gosh, now — thanks to multiculturalism and the insatiable need for English — those Korean bus passengers now share with me the exact same reason not to ride public transportation. America’s feral bus riders now in Korea, how excellent.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler
  • milton

    Korean Internet of a black gentleman

    That is not a gentleman.

    I don’t really know what else say except uncouth, foul scum like that should be denied passports.

  • http://ulsanonline.com martypants

    What a complete dickwad. No excuse for his behavior.

    Having said that, however, it must be really tough to spend your life in North America where (in many places) people still do use the N-word and mean it. And then to come over here and get discriminated against even more by people who fear him because of all the TV shows and movies that portray blacks the way he’s acting. No really tries to stand up to the guy and his “rocks”

  • http://www.eslwriting.org rockon

    Suddenly, this board has become rather pious.

    Never had a bad day folks? Never made a mistake?
    Never uttered a hypocritical word?

    It’s easy to be saintly and judgmental when shielded by a faded memory and a keyboard.

  • RolyPoly

    It is such a unfortunate thing that no one can speak good English to explain to this man what is going on. Korea needs to be an internal country, yet they are too busy learning kuiwon’s Chinese characters.

    English is an international language, the language of choice for travelers. So, I do not hold this man totally to blame. His understanding of Korean and Korean culture need improvement.

    It is similar to a situation where a man is having an heart attack and no doctor was present to help him. I am sure that many in the scene learned English but too shy to interfere and help out this misunderstanding.

    But Koreans love to study and improve their abilities. As soon as they understand the importance of English, they will kill themselves learning the language. That is if Kuiwon-kind does not impose their folly and make Koreans learn useless Chinese characters instead.

  • http://www.chiamattt.com chiamattt

    Rockon,

    Are you serious? You’ve had a “bad day” and “made a mistake” by getting violent on people you didn’t understand? Really? I can understand the dude lashing out with some bad language…ok, but getting violent? I don’t think thinking that guy is a complete fucktard is pious.

    Blaming that shit on “having a bad day” is as bad as blaming other stupid actions on “having a hard life” or “being drunk”.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Never had a bad day folks? Never made a mistake?
    Never uttered a hypocritical word?

    I’ve had plenty of bad days.

    Can’t say I’ve ever followed up one of those bad days by verbally and physically assaulting an elderly couple on the bus, though.

  • http://sonoficeberg.wordpress.com/ Iceberg

    Somebody needed to tase that bro’.

  • Baek-du boy

    I remember drinking with a couple of mates after mid-level Korean class at SNU. Now that one of them (a mixed race Korean/Aussie) was getting a bit more proficient in Korean and turned rude when he thought he was being spoken down to…a huge brawl erupted in the hoff..and eventually calmed down and in Korean style, they apologised and shared drinks.

    Lessons learned:
    1# Even learning Korean can result in more misunderstandings and it’s probably better NOT to lose your temper in a foreign country speaking a second language.

    2# It’s amazing how quickly in Korea misunderstandings can escalate into full blown punches and then just quick return to sharing a peaceful drink.

  • Baek-du boy

    #15 Roly…get over your beef with Chinese characters, nothing to do with this post.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    If this guy works for any kind of educational institution I can only hope they’re at the immigration office right now terminating his contract and getting him his exit order out of the country.

  • cmm

    Rockon, so was that you with the rocks? I can’t understand why anyone else would try to defend him.

  • http://atlantarofters.blogspot.com The Sanity Inspector

    Sure do hope that was not a soldier.

  • Wedge

    #18: Winning comment.

  • mazef

    I’d be the first to sign a petition to demand that arrogant fool be deported immediately!

  • Wedge

    #23: How many GIs have you seen with hair like that?

  • daveb

    This is bang out of order. Definately not a soldier with that hair. .. Just what is needed to bridge the Korean-foreigner gap! I hope he’s already been shopped.

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ kuiwon

    What’s more sad is that no one cared enough to help this old man.

  • cm

    I can’t believe the violent man would think that an elderly Korean man would know what “Ni*gg*er” is, to use it against him, let alone be able to understand English. Unbelievable.

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ kuiwon

    The most charitable RolyPoly has no good arguments against me, so now he resorts to childish name calling, the most fitting of tactics for the most charitable and most senior RolyPoly.

  • cm

    According to the news the black man was making a lot of noise inside the bus and the elder Korean man told him to shut up. In the ensuing verbal melee, the Korean elder said “니가 여기 앉아”, which was misinterpreted as the N word by the black man. The article went on to explain that blacks often say the N word to other blacks, as friendly gestures. But if other races say that word, it could make black people very angry.

  • RolyPoly

    The whole thing is a tragedy born out of ignorance. Korean elder’s lack of English knowledge and the traveler’s misunderstanding of Korean language.

    Tragedy born out of ignorance.

  • Iceberg

    Maybe if the old man had just said “please”, this could all have been avoided.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jqfbLI1LLc

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    The elderly man told him “you sit here”… The rather boorish person of African heritage decided to prove it is not just “angry white men” who cause trouble.

    Hard to defend, justify, or even tolerate such thuggish behavior, especially when he was so utterly wrong.

    But some folks will still try. After all, some folks still try to defend Josef Stalin, Charles Manson, and Osama bin Laden…

  • cm

    #32, “니가 여기 앉아” (nee-ga yeogi anja) means “you sit down here”. The Korean elder was speaking Korean. The Korean word “nee-ga” was what triggered this.

  • DLBarch

    The guy’s a thug. Deport him.

    Immediately. Without a hearing or appeal.

    DLB

  • Jeff Harrison

    It finally happened…. I have been joking for ages that this would happen. Now it has actually happened. Ugh…..

  • cm

    What finally happened?

  • Jeff Harrison

    CM: Um… A Korean and a black man get into an argument/fight because the black man misunderstood the word 니가.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    The guy’s a thug. Deport him.

    Immediately. Without a hearing or appeal.

    For assaulting an elderly man, he should do some time in a Korean prison before he’s deported. I wonder if he actually will, but that’s what should happen, IMHO.

  • milton

    According to the news the black man was making a lot of noise inside the bus and the elder Korean man told him to shut up.

    If that’s true, then good on the old man. I 100% wholeheartedly support old people telling young people (regardless of nationality) to “shut up” if they’re talking too loudly on public transportation. Last year, I was riding a completely-packed, stifling hot car on the number 2 line at 6am with two middle school girls yapping away in the most horrendous, screeching voices. An ajeosshi leaned over, smacked one of the girls on the arm and forcefully told her to shut up. That did the trick. He got a happy nod of approval from me.

    Unfortunately, some of the younger foreigners here do have a tendency to think that Seoul’s public transportation system is little more than a mobile living room, so I’d say the guy was well within his purview here.

    I can only hope they’re at the immigration office right now terminating his contract and getting him his exit order out of the country.

    I can’t only hope that’s just the start of what that turd has coming to him. Even if the old dude did call him the N-word, that’s not an excuse to get violent. I also have no sympathy for foreigners who get in trouble because they failed to understand basic Korean. Sorry, but if you come to live in Korea, you learn Korean (or at least make the effort). If you don’t, you’re on your own, bud.

  • RolyPoly

    I think most Korean will understand how he must have felt. After all, his behavior was not an willful misconduct. Rather, it came from misunderstanding.

    Koreans have suffered under the Japanese rule. So, they understand why the underclass have pent-up anger. Especially, the expression was confused with racial 욕.

    Koreans, after learning what “N” word stands for, will forgive this young man. At least, I hope so.

  • adhaglin

    @cm, it’s quite possible that the man could have known the word, considering that when you look up 흑인 in a korean dictionary, that is one the words listed, usually with no more context than that. at my last middle school the head english teacher used the word all the time. i wanted to give him the benefit of the doubt, that he just didn’t know that it was offensive. except that when he used it, it was to talk about how much he hated black people. which seemed to make it somewhat of a moot point.

    obviously, though, not what’s happening here.

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ kuiwon

    Here is what the old Naver 영한사전 listed under 흑인 http://endic2009.naver.com/endic.nhn?docid=2950260&rd=s

    흑인(黑人) a black (person);a colored person;a darky;a nigger;a Negro
    흑인을 차별하다 segregate the colored people
    흑인 거주 지구(黑人居住地區) a black ghetto
    흑인극(黑人劇) a blackface show
    흑인 문제(黑人問題) the colored problem[question]
    흑인 분리 반대(黑人分離反對) an antisegregation 《movement》
    흑인 분리 반대자 an antisegregationist
    흑인 분리 정책(黑人分離政策) the segregation policy
    흑인 영가(黑人靈歌) a Negro spiritual
    흑인 옹호(黑人擁護) negrophilism
    흑인 옹호자 a negrophil(e)
    흑인 음악(黑人音樂) Negro music
    흑인종(黑人種) the black[colored, African] race
    흑인 지대(黑人地帶) the Black Belt
    흑인 차별 대우(黑人差別待遇) segregation《미》;apartheid(남아프리카 공화국)
    흑인 차별 대우 폐지론자 a nigger lover
    흑인 학교(黑人學校) a colored school

  • hamel

    let me just pop over to the Metropolitician’s blog…

  • cmm

    The Korean word “nee-ga” was what triggered this.

    I didn’t notice this in the video, though it was loud and blurred. It seems like the video started up after the shitstain got his panties in a wad. What evidence is there that his misunderstanding of 니가 was behind his display? He wasn’t talking about racism from what I could hear, he was talking about the rocks.

    The guy’s a thug. Deport him.

    Eff that… We don’t want this menace back in North America, DLB. If we can send him away, let’s send him north!

  • cm

    #46, according to Korean news, and some of the comments in the video. That’s what they’re saying, so I’m just going by what’s out there. If the misunderstanding really happened, I’m guessing it happened prior to this video was being captured so it doesn’t show on the video. I’d sure like to find out that black guy’s side of the story.

    #45, and hamel, it’s pretty much predictable what that blog will say.. that it’s Korean racism which caused this man to defend himself.

  • cmm

    darky? nigger lover? …lack of context/explanation wow.

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ kuiwon

    #48 – I’m pretty sure it’s based off some Korean-English dictionary from an earlier era.

  • iMe

    Thanks to this moron, all of Korea will now know what 니가 means in English. What a dick.

    RolyPoly,
    you wrote:

    “The whole thing is a tragedy born out of ignorance. Korean elder’s lack of English knowledge and the traveler’s misunderstanding of Korean language.”

    Didn’t this happen in Korea? Why is the elder Korean man “ignorant” for his lack of English? Would you consider Americans ignorant if they can’t speak Spanish in the USA?

    I’ll say it again: Fuck multiculturalism!

  • bumfromkorea

    Well, obviously the elderly Korean gentleman ought to have been able to speak English. You know, to save time for the English-speaking jackass tourists from saying “Why can’t you speak English? I do!”

  • fanwarrior

    #4, I had a coworker back home go on a business trip to china. While he was there, they decided to watch an NBA game on TV with the chinese guys, he said it got so bad he had call it an early night. He’s not black, but he’s a fairly inoffensive and sensitive guy.

    As for explaining 니가.. could you imagine a Korean with sub-par english skills trying to explain that to him?

    “니가..means…you”
    “Yeah, I f-ing know it means me!”

  • robert neff

    Well Metro hasn’t commented on it yet but he did have this posting about a month ago in which he wrote:

    And this seems to ring true on the bus. Basically, if you are a foreigner, and especially if you are dark and swarthy, people won’t sit next to you, even on the most crowded bus where there’s standing-room-only. It’s actually pretty insulting, since what people are all saying is that they’d rather stand and then sit next to your inferior ass.

    Knowing this, I have always stuck in a conundrum. Do I politely put my big bag in my lap and let the seat so empty, a constant reminder of how disgusting Korean people find me, or do I leave it there, and create the impression that I am a big, fat assh*le? I’ve been leaning on the side of the latter lately, since I am just sick of doing something charitable but made to feel stupid.

    In the end, Korea is busy enjoying the fruits of consumable “multiculturalism”: nice Italian cuisine, Chilean wine, and the like. But deep dw, most Koreans don’t even want to sit next to you on the bus.

    To a point I have to agree with him. I have often enjoyed the luxury of an empty seat next to me on the bus or subway even though other people – meaning Koreans – were standing. Was it a matter of BO, body size or the fact that I hadn’t had my first cup of coffee yet? Nope.

    But, with that all said, it works the opposite way too. The bus, restaurant, bar, subway can be completely empty and people will come over and sit right next to me. It could be because they are curious about foreigners, want to practice English, fear being alone and are convinced there is safety in numbers or, and this is my personal choice, because I am just a good-natured, handsome guy (obvious sarcasm there).

    The point is – as a foreigner residing in Korea you get the good and the bad. We enjoy a lot of privileges and we have to endure some prejudicisms. But this incident has nothing to do with that – it is just about a guy that – as Rockon insist, had a bad day and made it worse by acting like a total azz.

  • http://dok.do/4lur41 Apodyopsis Gymnophoria

    I love how the Koreans on the bus, stand around watching – they seem as if its a daily occurance, and showed no fear at all.

  • cm

    I’d have to fault at least 20% on the Korean elder. He should not have told off the man to shut up, even if it was irritating. But that still doesn’t excuse the violent assault on an old man and the woman who was trying to protect the old man. What makes everything worse, is not just the racial component to this incident, but also the big cultural unforgivable no no of verbally/physically attacking an old elderly person.

  • cm

    “Was it a matter of BO, body size or the fact that I hadn’t had my first cup of coffee yet?”

    No. I would say they’re afraid of you.

  • JG29A

    흑인 차별 대우 폐지론자 a nigger lover

    Wow, I can’t wait for one of my students who “supports the abolition of discrimination against blacks” to explain it to me in English with the help of Naver.

  • Fullslab

    Most of you were ready to stone the black man or put him in jail ASAP etc… before knowing his side of the story. How many times do people at the Marmot’s hole cuss out those who don’t know Korean culture. In this case you thought an old Korean man didn’t follow his own Korean culture by speaking to a foreigner(Koreans don’t speak to foreigners). Or, since when does an old Korean offer his seat to a younger man(a black one at that)? Ya’ll should’ve condemned the old Korean man who didn’t follow Korean culture. At least some of you have probably blamed the victim before so why not this time
    # 15 Roly Poly,
    “His understanding of Korean and Korean culture need improvement.”
    Again, the Korean old man didn’t follow his own culture(according to the 1st one-sided story).

    Now that a 2nd version of the story comes out, tourists are suppose to know to shut up. Swell, KTO’s next marketing catch phrase should be “Come to Korea, but SHUT the F@#$ – UP.”

  • 깊은 구멍 속에

    Do I politely put my big bag in my lap and let the seat so empty, a constant reminder of how disgusting Korean people find me, or do I leave it there, and create the impression that I am a big, fat assh*le?

    As a large man myself I don’t fault Koreans for not wanting to sit next to me on the bus. Korean buses were built with Koreans in mind and sitting next to an overweight foreigner with broad shoulders for any amount of time is uncomfortable (for both of us). Perhaps the author should look in the mirror to see if there aren’t other reasons as to why Koreans don’t want to share a bus bench with him before rushing to pull the race card.

  • hardyandtiny

    so stupid…

  • cmm

    I wonder if the Metropolitician is still workin’ away on that thesis.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    How many times do people at the Marmot’s hole cuss out those who don’t know Korean culture. In this case you thought an old Korean man didn’t follow his own Korean culture by speaking to a foreigner(Koreans don’t speak to foreigners).

    Koreans don’t speak to foreigners as a cultural rule? That’s new to me.

    Or, since when does an old Korean offer his seat to a younger man(a black one at that)? Ya’ll should’ve condemned the old Korean man who didn’t follow Korean culture. At least some of you have probably blamed the victim before so why not this time

    Remind me when we condemned a foreigner that was beaten after committing the unpardonable offense of offering his seat to a social inferior.

    Now that a 2nd version of the story comes out, tourists are suppose to know to shut up. Swell, KTO’s next marketing catch phrase should be “Come to Korea, but SHUT the F@#$ – UP.”

    Yes, tourists are supposed to know to shut up. And Koreans aren’t the only ones who bitch about this. Ask pretty much anyone on the planet, and they’ll tell you, “AMERICANS ARE TOO EFFING LOUD.”

  • Yu Bum Suk

    Yes, training oneself to speak softly makes one much less of a potential annoyance to those who may be a bit too quick to get annoyed by foreigners.

  • Fullslab

    I didn’t mention any cultural “rule.” But, I could count on one hand how many times a Korean has approached me speaking Korean unless by mistake. And this would’ve only happened when they approached me from behind and thought I was Korean, or if they are telling me do something on a bus like “Close your window” even though it’s the only one open on the entire bus.

    “Ask pretty much anyone on the planet, and they’ll tell you, “AMERICANS ARE TOO EFFING LOUD.”

    Oh, so you know what most “anyone on the planet” would say do you? Maybe you should define the American you have in mind since it is a Mozaic, I thought you knew that. Your “AMERICANS ARE TOO EFFING LOUD” is a stereotype and has NEVER come up during one of my classes when discussing stereotypes. Sorry, but your “anyone on the planet” wouldn’t be any of the Koreans in my classes. Horrible attempt at classifying every American as too F******* loud because of that black man on the bus.

    “offering his seat to a social inferior.”
    As I understand it, that didn’t happen so try again.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    “I could count on one hand how many times a Korean has approached me speaking Korean unless by mistake.”

    Approached me speaking Korean? Well, I guess not all that often but I’d certainly run out of fingers and toes. Speaking Korean in daily transactions? It happens all the time. Just yesterday at the IAAF games a policeman approached asking me in Korean to get off the bleachers because someone was going to pack them up.

  • Pingback: 니가, Nigger and Idiot Foreigners | David S. Wills

  • Fullslab

    For goodness sake, the culture is that a Korean man doesn’t approach a Korean woman unless he knows her or is going to sexually harass(Pikki). So, why would a Korean approach a foreigner(unless for a free English quicky lesson)? It’s simple, that ain’t the way it is within the Korean culture.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    I didn’t mention any cultural “rule.”

    I quote:

    In this case you thought an old Korean man didn’t follow his own Korean culture by speaking to a foreigner(Koreans don’t speak to foreigners). Or, since when does an old Korean offer his seat to a younger man(a black one at that)? Ya’ll should’ve condemned the old Korean man who didn’t follow Korean culture.

    Oh, so you know what most “anyone on the planet” would say do you? Maybe you should define the American you have in mind since it is a Mozaic, I thought you knew that.

    Right, OK. Americans AREN’T too loud when traveling abroad. My mistake. As you were.

  • Fullslab

    “Just yesterday at the IAAF games a policeman approached asking me in Korean to get off the bleachers because someone was going to pack them up.”

    One of my points was “unless they were telling me to do something” so that doesn’t count. A traffic officer once told me to stop walking on the sidewalk on the 15th of the month between 2:00 – 2:15 while other Koreans were riding their bikes or walking on the other side of the road(near Hyatt Hotel). I didn’t know what he was saying at first but I figured it out soon afterwards.

  • hamel

    For goodness sake, the culture is that a Korean man doesn’t approach a Korean woman unless he knows her or is going to sexually harass(Pikki).

    Do you know what a 삐끼 is?

    So, why would a Korean approach a foreigner(unless for a free English quicky lesson)? It’s simple, that ain’t the way it is within the Korean culture.

    What on earth are you talking about, man? Even if your first point (quoted above) was true (it is not), what a non sequitur to follow it up with this second point.

    Sometimes on a blog it is best to remain silent and not give anyone the idea that you are a fool, rather than to put fingers to keyboard and remove all doubt.

  • hamel

    fullslab:

    One of my points was “unless they were telling me to do something” so that doesn’t count.

    In this context, when the altercation appears to have started after the Korean man spoke to the black man to either sit down or be quiet, doesn’t that count? If not, what is your point exactly?

  • bumfromkorea

    Do you know what a 삐끼 is?

    Obviously not. :D

  • http://www.chiamattt.com chiamattt

    Who gives a fuck what Korean culture is. It doesn’t matter. This also has nothing to do with multiculturalism. The dude was a fucktard, that’s all. He doesn’t represent his country, city, or even family as far as I am concerned. He attacked someone on the bus. He’s a thug, and he’d be a thug in any country.

  • iNeville

    I haven’t read all the comments above just a few. I agree with much of what I’ve read and offer this comment as well. I apologize if it repeats anything already said but at the same time I’d be happy to know that the line of reasoning is common:
    ——-
    It’s a sad situation all around and I wish it hadn’t come to that. He makes black people look bad for the obvious reason that he’s a young man assaulting (verbally and physically) an elderly couple. But I find it also sad for reasons presumably not so obvious.
    1) It’s a sad because it’s a social commentary on how much has NOT changed in the world. I’d contend not much has changed when it comes to accepting others who are different from ourselves. And I loathe the term tolerate. I’m talking about acceptance not just putting up with or bearing with. Like many other places, there is racism in Korea. I deal with it a fair amount personally. An example is not know if I’m being denied something because of the way I look or because truly unavailable. I usually just forget it and move on or if I’m brave enough, I’ll ask someone else the next day. I discovered the latter option and make use of it because I’ve realized that some people are really lazy and don’t want check if there is a shirt in my size. Not because they don’t want to serve me even though I’m using my best Korean. Years of conditioning has prevented latter from being my first thought however and the former takes precedence.
    2) It’s sad because, Koreans are people of colour too and have been (and continue to be) subject to racism in a similar fashion although not as severe as blacks have been. So why inflict stereotypical judgments on other minorities? The common experience of prejudice should unite us rather than divide us. I’d be remiss if I didn’t highlight that black people also discriminate against each other: Light skin vs dark skin. We can try to deny it but we all know lighter skin is generally favoured in the black community as it is in Indian and Sri Lankan communities because of it’s historic connection with privilege, wealth, power, etc. It’s a human condition to fear what we don’t understand. It’s part of our primitive brain. But just like we’ve learned it’s not okay clobber a woman over the head, take her back to our cave and essentially rape her, I have faith that our cerebra will also learn to overrule our primitive and cerebellar fear of the unknown by simply seeking to make the unknown cerebrally known.
    3) It’s sad because, some people (Koreans and Foreigners alike) will generalize, in their ignorance, that all black people are easily angered and violent. I must say when people tell me to “calm down” when I’m passionately expressing a point, does set me off. To my mind it’s a loaded statement. To me it’s a generalization that blacks need to calm down because they are so violent and easily angered. I know…it’s a vicious cycle. But hey I’m a work in progress and who isn’t?
    I’ll end on this. Being loud in public is extremely annoying to me as I’m sure it was to the elderly gentleman who allegedly told the guy to shut up. I had the misfortune of being on a bus ride this weekend with a Canadian (I’m embarrassed to say) who wouldn’t for the life of him shut up! He was incredibly loud on a crowded bus and kept dropping the f-bomb every second word with children onboard. I was ashamed as a foreigner and a Canadian. However, I’ve been on many a subway ride where the Korean next to me is being loud while talking to a friend beside him or on the phone. Most Koreans are polite but some, like this dude in the video allegedly was behaving, are not. I think in general we don’t like when someone is talking too loud but it’s even more annoying when we don’t or cannot understand what is being said. It sounds like mindless noise, frustrations rise and the situation becomes explosive. I hope no one was seriously injured as a result of this, that the subject in question feels remorse for his actions and corrects his ways and that blacks are not systematically ill-treated in a knee-jerk reaction because of the actions of one man.

  • dww

    @72.
    Yeah, I’m not sure where the whole multiculturalism thing is coming from, too.

  • Fullslab

    hamel,
    I’ll give it to ya. But that’s the thing, it only happens when they tell ya something. Maybe the guy gets told to shut up everytime he’s on the bus no matter how soft he speaks and he’s tired of it. How can you talk to anyone on the bus and not be heard by someone else unless you whisper or get close and speak in their ear? If he had spoken softly into his Korean girlfriend’s ear, his girlfriend would’ve been called – 흑인 차별 대우 폐지론자 a nigger lover.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    “So, why would a Korean approach a foreigner”

    Out of curiousity? It’s happened to me a number of times, especially around subway and bus platforms.

    You have to remember that while most Koreans display the same habits towards foreigners they do to Koreans, some seem to think that a completely different law of etiquette applies. Foreigners are also much more likely to be approached by the mentally ill.

  • cmm

    re Update 2… so the popo got to see the rocks too?

  • fanwarrior

    #58

    Or, since when does an old Korean offer his seat to a younger man(a black one at that)?

    I’ve had no less than 6 different older Koreans, most often elderly, insist I take their seat. I had one woman who must have been 80 tell me to take her seat in near perfect English. Most recently , just last week I got on the train, and a 50ish guy saw me and immediately got to his feet and despite the other people standing there, steer me into his seat. I thought he was getting off at the next stop, but he stayed on at least 5 more stops.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    It doesn’t happen regularly, but I’ve also had people older than me offer me their seats.

    When my Mum came to visit me in Korea she was 69 and had completely white hair. People of all ages, including other seniors, always gave up their seats for her. Maybe because of the hair they thought she was 100.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Dude, they let the guy walk because they didn’t have a translator? In Bundang?

    http://www.newdaily.co.kr/news/article.html?no=90316

  • dokdoforever

    Do Koreans really want foreigners to learn Korean? I doubt it. That would really interfere with any attempt to use foreigners for English practice. It’s certainly rude to speak loudly in a foreign language in public places – Korean tourists aren’t much better than Americans though. I’ve taken the Korean group tours to Hong Kong and Thailand and seen some boorish behavior.

    The empty bus seat- this probably doesn’t have anything to do with being overweight. Ten years ago I used to take the Ilsan Yoido express bus every day – the seat next to me was always the last empty seat, without exception. Many Koreans are just scared of non-Koreans.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    So he walks but someone who stops a taxi driver from assaulting a female passenger gets sued for so much that he has to flee the country? Who was it who said something about ‘getting the foreigners they deserve’?

    80, I don’t get (or if I do, don’t notice) the empty bus seat that often. I do have some friends who say it happens to them all the time. I guess I just look very benign.

  • hardyandtiny

    The bus driver stopped in front of the police station. That’s hilarious!

  • http://pawikoreapics.blogspot.com/ pawikirogii 石鵝

    ‘As a large man myself I don’t fault Koreans for not wanting to sit next to me on the bus. Korean buses were built with Koreans in mind and sitting next to an overweight foreigner with broad shoulders for any amount of time is uncomfortable (for both of us).’ kipun kumong soge

    what???? i thought you were a woman AND korean! now i find out you are a big foreigner with broad shoulders. i am surprised.

  • cmm

    Dude, they let the guy walk because they didn’t have a translator? In Bundang?

    Don’t be surprised. The one time I had to deal with the police/crime (I was not the offender, btw) I was in two different police stations in 강남 (one in 도곡, one in 수서) all night and until sunrise and they couldn’t (or wouldn’t) come up with a translator for me.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    I’m guessing that at the time they let him walk they didn’t know there was a video or it that would go viral. That’s not too surprising at all.

    Anyone yet find out if he’s an English teacher?

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Anyone yet find out if he’s an English teacher?

    Yes, he is an English teacher. American and 24 years old. See my update to the post.

  • dokdoforever

    Poor Pawi had fallen for 깊은 구멍 속에’s picture. Who is that girl by the way?

  • MrMao

    I doubt that the reason he was told to be quiet was because he was talking too loudly in English; it was probably because he was talking in a language other than Korean.

    When I think of all the (insert nationality here) people I see talking at full volume in Chinese/Urdu/Korean/Estonian/Arabic/Tagalog/Punjabi/Bantu/Aramaic on public transport in Canada and the UK, I cannot recall anyone ever telling anyone else to keep it down because they would be seen as culturally insensitive and racist. (And yes, you might get your ass kicked, no matter how much older you are.) This has much to do with the death of polite culture in the west and the epidemic of cellphones and mp3 players, but it also says that westerners are not intimidated or angered by the mere sound of other languages. The same cannot be said of Koreans.

    So yeah, come to Korea but keep your disgusting language down around the locals. By the way, you have to let them into your country by the million to buy up the real estate but you are a foreigner no matter how long you live in Korea and will never be seen as an equal. Please spare me the “Actually I have an F/E/Z class visa and took the TOPIK and might qualify for residency in a trillion years.” Koreans want westerners to come to Korea, teach English all day long to huge classes and then spend all night learning Korean, but they’d better not be living with a Korean woman. Korea insists on segregation, and complains at the lack of integration. Look at the piece on asiae, it starts with heug in. Why is that necessary?

    As for those patriotic Koreans, they sure are doing a good job protecting that old couple from that American. Apathy, thy name is Korea.

  • http://dok.do/4lur41 Apodyopsis Gymnophoria

    The American economy goes downhill, and all the loser Americans who are unemployed come to Korea, where loser Korean schools employ them.

    the foreigner was on the bus talking with his girlfriend loudly.

    The girlfriend must also be a loser to be with such a prick in the first place and the school which employed him are losers, but hopefully would have fired him today. (Next time hire the blonde with the blue eyes and H cup)

  • Yu Bum Suk

    Thanks Robert. I wonder if he worked public or hagwon. If puplic he’d make a good case for why the government should put a preference on mature teachers, not early-to-mid twenty-somethings.

    MrMao, you seriously have trouble believing that this gentleman was being an ass before the camera started recording?

  • cmm

    The video in the link @80 is much more clear than first and worth checking out. What a dick.

  • YangachiBastardo

    As for those patriotic Koreans, they sure are doing a good job protecting that old couple from that American. Apathy, thy name is Korea.

    Damned if i do, damned if i don’t ! I really can imagine what many would write if some ajosshi ganged up on this idiot, gave him a good beating and threw him out on the sidewalk as he deserved.

    I don’t know maybe i was lucky in Korea, but guys let’s be honest, as a former semi-thug i can say with some confidence that if you DO NOT look for trouble, generally trouble doesn’t find you.

    In MOST cases if you end up in some shitty fight, it is because you did something or you had some predispositon for it.

    The world is not out to lynch American tourists/soldiers, it is not out to rape blonde women (i had some hilarious experiences with some foreign women living here in Milano who were literally terrorised, to whom i was really tempted to reply with a “Sweetheart did you look at yourself in the mirror ?”) , it is not out to assault dark-skinned people, it is not out to gang up on poor English teachers. Truly we don’t give a shit, provided the aforementioned categories (and everybody else) don’t behave like animals.

    If you go around flaunting your flip-flops and your thong underwear in Riyad you will get very little sympathy from me when the proverbial shit storm ensues.

    And don’t tell me the locals do the same or worse, locals are the locals: their pisspond, their rules, love it or leave it. If you come visit my home i expect you not to leave dirty socks around, even if i have the tendency to do so in my place.

  • YangachiBastardo

    Thanks Robert. I wonder if he worked public or hagwon. If puplic he’d make a good case for why the government should put a preference on mature teachers, not early-to-mid twenty-somethings.

    The hagwon system should be entirely done away with imho

  • YangachiBastardo

    The American economy goes downhill, and all the loser Americans who are unemployed come to Korea, where loser Korean schools employ them

    A bit harsh but not entirely wrong

    (Next time hire the blonde with the blue eyes and H cup)

    Dammitall man lay off the H anime full of blonde, deformed-tits gothic lolitas !! I say it cos i’m concerned for your health

  • janlee21

    What would it take anyone to get that angry? It takes 2 to tango. I don’t need to remind anyone on this blog that Koreans are the most racist people on earth, especially against blacks or anyone or country they deem as ‘inferior’ to them.

    Give this guy a break. He deserves punishment for shoving a girl. as far as everything else, who knows what really happened, it’s all speculation. The real heroes that deserve commending here are those brave Korean souls who intervened so courageously during the conflict by standing idly and filming while women were getting shoved around.

  • YangachiBastardo

    By the way, you have to let them into your country by the million to buy up the real estate

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA Yeah really cos there’s really any real estate market left in the world that can afford to refuse foreign investors money.
    Sorry dude but in any business circle people you may find people are literally trampling over each other to do business with Asia.

    This makes as much sense as a restaurant owner telling me he’s doing me a favour by sharing his food with me when i patronize his business.

  • yuna

    The Korean man should have addressed him in 존대말 (polite). The man is too old to be addressed so. “Panmal haji maseyo.” would have done it.

    For those foreigners in similar situations where they feel like random old people are being unjustly nosey or butting in to tell them off, you should just tell them:

    아저씨(아주머니 or 할머니) 오지랖이 하늘과 같이 넓으시군요.
    ajossi(insert as appropriate, ajumoni,halmoni etc) ojirabi hanulkwa katchi nolbushigunyo.

    and try to stop further communication with them.

  • cm

    #89:
    “I cannot recall anyone ever telling anyone else to keep it down because they would be seen as culturally insensitive and racist. (And yes, you might get your ass kicked, no matter how much older you are.) ”

    MrMao, it doesn’t happen very often, but never say never. I’ve seen it happen couple of times in Canada. Once there was an Indian man in a bus quietly talking in his language with his wife, and the woman across them suddenly lashed out “shut up”, “speak English”, “you people come to my country, what’s dkjfkdjlsjljdk (mimicking the language)… on an on in a very hostile tone, for at least 10 minutes. Nobody spoke up to tell the woman to shut the hell up. The poor couple had to listen to this verbal abuse until they just walked off the bus. Point is, things like this can happen anywhere, even in multicultural Canada.

  • cm

    The elderly Korean man was probably being rude to the guy by saying “shut up”, but judging by the way how the “English Teacher” responded by violence and over-reaction, I tend to believe the English Teacher was probably being intentionally a clown in the bus, purposely trying to irritate everyone in the bus to make some kind of a point.

    As for the Koreans not sitting beside foreigners. I think it’s a combination of fear, size (bigger size you are, more fear), color (black people are feared much more than other races), and high profile incidents like this bus incident doesn’t really help diminish the fear of foreigners but reinforces those fears.

  • cm

    And here’s our Metropolitician

    http://metropolitician.blogs.com/scribblings_of_the_metrop/2011/08/when-the-nigger-starts-to-win.html#comments

    he writes..

    “Mostly because I know the police are gonna screw me, the crowd will turn on me, ”

    No, the police didn’t screw the guy. He was let go because they didn’t have a translator. It was the beat up Korean man who was screwed. And what crowd that turned on the man? The “crowd”, did nothing.

  • Fullslab

    cm # 99
    “and high profile incidents like this bus incident doesn’t really help…”
    What other “high profile” incidents? Just because the media exaggerates isn’t an excuse. Koreans usually say they don’t believe the media, so which is it?

    cm # 100,
    “It was the beat up Korean man who was screwed.” The guy didn’t have a scratch on him, or did I miss something.

  • YangachiBastardo

    In order to de-dramatise the situation… :)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3N8c1t1QTDI

  • cm

    #101, it is high profile, whether we like it or not. It’s all over the internet and the news. That’s the reality.

    The guy didn’t have a scratch on him, but that ET should be charged with assault on an elderly man, and should at least be forced to apologize to the victim(s), including the woman who was trying to stop the fight but got slapped down. If the Korean man insulted you, you have the right to say something back and walk away. But there was no need for that kind of violence, period. It just shows what kind a character that guy was, so I tend to be less sympathetic.

  • MrMao

    Yangachi, I think that your death of the hagwon system is about as likely as my ever being able to afford to buy a house in my hometown. It’s hard to be philosophical about it, although not particularly constructive.

    What amuses me about the whole situation is that the dude thinks that if the ajoshi were to call him a ____, it would be with a black American accent.

    Let’s put it this way: if I were sitting on a bus and my friend told someone to shut up because he was talking in another language, I would have a hard time supporting my friend and would understand it if the other party got upset about it. I would hope that it wouldn’t lead to violence, but I wouldn’t be amazed if it did. The cellphone video footage would be unlikely to make the news, as it doesn’t conform to some narrative of the natives as innocent victims of marauding foreigners.

    I can imagine anyone getting angry, but I cannot just jump to the conclusion that this guy was causing havoc prior to this based on his skin colour, hair and clothing. The video has, however, made me very happy to no longer be in Moran-dong on an overcrowded bus to Bundang. In Korea, your options are buying a car and sitting in trafffic, riding transit and getting into arguments with strangers or buying a motorcycle and getting run over. It’s a losers’ racket.

  • guitard

    Just saw the video on MBC news ~ it’s going viral in a big way.

  • guitard

    “Viral in a big way.”

    I guess that’s a little redundant, huh?

  • YangachiBastardo

    The video has, however, made me very happy to no longer be in Moran-dong on an overcrowded bus to Bundang. In Korea, your options are buying a car and sitting in trafffic, riding transit and getting into arguments with strangers or buying a motorcycle and getting run over. It’s a losers’ racket.

    I feel your pain man, having my licence stripped away for 4 months and having consequently to rely on public transportation for that time, made me realise what kind of privilege truly is sitting my lazy ass on a comfy chair in an air-conditioned car while blasting techno music by myself, waiting for a jammed road to unclog

  • Charles Tilly

    As a large man myself….

    What do you mean by “large”? Large as in obese or large as in you got a thick layer of muscle? Just tell me you’re not some shameless fat-ass like the Metropolitician (Seriously, that dude’s physically repulsive).

  • YangachiBastardo

    Just tell me you’re not some shameless fat-ass like the Metropolitician (Seriously, that dude’s physically repulsive).

    Appearance is the least repulsive element of this Metropolitician dude persona

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    No excuses for attacking an old person. Ever.

  • Granfalloon

    I have a question.

    I don’t have so much as even the slightest desire to take a side in this issue, but I’m curious: are Koreans bothered more by foreigners being loud than by Koreans being being loud? Assume that loudness, age, context etc. are equal, and that “botheredness” is something we can quantify. What do you think?

  • a K-A

    I don’t care what color you are – black, purple, green or the whole array in the rainbow – physical assault on the weaker, ESPECIALLY on the elderly, is just wrong. Doesn’t matter what the elderly man had said or what the young man did or did not do prior to the incident. It does NOT matter what kind of day he had been having or what kind of racism he had dealt with in the past. IT STILL DOES NOT EXCUSE HIS BEHAVIOUR.

  • George Tirebiter

    I wonder how the mighty Marmot himself would stand up to scrutiny if recorded via smottphone at his hottest, most irritable, perhaps just after a series of aggravating racist encounters…in a selectively edited YouTube video. I’m sure he’d be the very first one to start bleating for his own deportation and subsequent life imprisonment minutes after he was released from the police station. Maybe someone needs to mellow out and do another scintillating week-long architectural review of Korean churches. Wow, knee-jerk reactionary much?

    Do you seriously think the person who posted a video on YouTube provided the kind of “fair and balanced” coverage we’ve all become so accustomed to on the internets? There may be more to it, but let’s rush to judgment and totally abuse Bob’s unmoderated comments section.

    Also I just wanted to say how hilarious and yet…enlightened y’all are (and Bob for allowing it…not a new thing here, right?) for thinkin that Metro’s weight and appearance are fair game even though his race, education, and whathaveyou are off the table. Unless he’s got his hand on your thigh and he’s licking your ear, I don’t think what he looks like really enters into the discussion.

    Oh, do click the blog link below…there must be a contest for least tasteful discussion of this issue in the first evening after the event. WTF.

  • Mryouknowwho

    One time on the subway in Seoul I was with another American friend and we were speaking English in a regular volume when a young 30 something woman turned to me, put her finger on her lips and hushed me like a child. I spoke enough Korean to confront the woman and tell her that I thought we weren’t being loud. Then she pointed to the man she was with as if to imply it was he who wanted us to be quiet. I told the both of them that I thought they were rude to ask us to be quiet when, in my opinion, we were speaking at a regular level. The man didn’t turn around to face us and that was the end of it. My friend and I continued our conversation.

    I think the man simply didn’t want to hear two people speaking English so close to him and so he said something to his girlfriend who in turn gave us the hush sign.

    At no point did the thought of violence cross my mind, but I was ready to exchange as many words as needed using my broken Korean to defend my behavior.

    I’ve never, in my five years in Korea, seen anyone hushed in public transportation except for one taxi driver who asked me and a group of friends to keep it down, and an intercity bus driver who asked EVERYONE to basically shut up twice on a 1 hour drive.

    I feel that the better my Korean gets (TOPIK Level 4 baby!), the easier it is for me to confront Koreans in their language whether it be my fault, theirs, or a simple misunderstanding.

    Conversely, when I first arrived in Korea and began learning Korean, it was impossible for me to determine if someone was being rude to me outside of standard cuss words. I told myself to give Koreans the benefit of the doubt, as long as I didn’t fully understand the situation.

  • http://dok.do/4lur41 Apodyopsis Gymnophoria

    Do you seriously think the person who posted a video on YouTube provided the kind of “fair and balanced” coverage we’ve all become so accustomed to on the internets?

    It’s fair…

    He has dark skin and dreadlocks, he used a LOUD voice and he hit a grandmother..

    let’s track him down tomorrow and crucify him…

  • http://dok.do/4lur41 Apodyopsis Gymnophoria

    Do you seriously think the person who posted a video on YouTube provided the kind of “fair and balanced” coverage we’ve all become so accustomed to on the internets?

    balanced?

    probably not. He is just another guy sick of Korean grandfathers trying to control other people with their “seniority” and acted accordingly. However, in so doing, did make a fool of, and cause trouble for himself.

    Sometimes, just walking away or ignoring is the best thing to do.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    I wonder how the mighty Marmot himself would stand up to scrutiny if recorded via smottphone at his hottest, most irritable, perhaps just after a series of aggravating racist encounters…in a selectively edited YouTube video. I’m sure he’d be the very first one to start bleating for his own deportation and subsequent life imprisonment minutes after he was released from the police station.

    I’d be more than happy to call for my own deportation if I ever get caught on video assaulting a man in his 60s for saying something mean to me.

    What do you mean by “large”? Large as in obese or large as in you got a thick layer of muscle? Just tell me you’re not some shameless fat-ass like the Metropolitician (Seriously, that dude’s physically repulsive).

    No need for that.

  • Jieun K

    are Koreans bothered more by foreigners being loud than by Koreans being loud?

    I would be equally bothered, if at all, AND would not act on it. I’d cautiously (ha) bet that 7 or 8 out of 10 Koreans would be like that. (I suspect this probability would apply universally.)

    I suppose, however, one’s physical traits outstandingly different from those in the surroundings will positively affect the chances of the “rouser” being conceived as a source of danger and thus inviting action.

  • YangachiBastardo

    I’m sure he’d be the very first one to start bleating for his own deportation and subsequent life imprisonment minutes after he was released from the police station

    Nobody here called for life inprisonment or quality time in a Uday Hussein-operated torture chamber or whatever, most seem to think that deportation from Korea with a few wedgies along the way is the appropriate punishment for this douche, big fuckin’ deal

    Also I just wanted to say how hilarious and yet…enlightened y’all are (and Bob for allowing it…not a new thing here, right?) for thinkin that Metro’s weight and appearance are fair game even though his race, education, and whathaveyou are off the table

    I didn’t even know this Metro dude was fat, i personally find his personality repulsive to say the least

    No excuses for attacking an old person. Ever.

    I can’t say you’re wrong Hoju cos you’re not, your position is the ethical one, Period. Said so some gramps are really a huge test even for the most Zen personalities

  • Avaast

    I’m also interested in why people might find speaking in English on the subway particularly annoying…I suppose that means telling jokes or a ripping good yarn to a non-Korean speaker is out of the question on public transport?

    We’ve often heard stories of packs of roaming 20-year-olds playing drunken card games in the middle of a subway car, or singing on the bus…those things are of course rather silly, and might quite deservedly attract public disdain, but if I were to get a call from an old friend, or tell a joke to my team leader in English because he wants to exercise the old linguistic muscles (I *hope* that doesn’t mean anything dirty) and then get told to shut up, I think I’d be rather put out.

    Actually, a great place to test out the annoying English theory is the 서울시립미술관. I visited there with a Spanish friend of mine, and took it upon myself to help explain the meaning of some of the Korean signs in English, whereupon an attendant instantly teleported herself behind me and asked in a commanding tone that I be quiet. I suppose that means the four 10-year-old Korean kids running around one of the sculptures screaming their heads off were part of the exhibit.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    I didn’t even know this Metro dude was fat, i personally find his personality repulsive to say the least

    Obviously, I have my philosophical differences with Metro and tend to see things very different from him, but offline, I consider him a friend of mine, and he’s really quite an engaging fellow.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    PS: If you have personal issues with Mike, take them up on his blog, not mine.

  • YangachiBastardo

    PS: If you have personal issues with Mike, take them up on his blog, not mine

    Fair enough, i apologise

  • http://dok.do/4lur41 Apodyopsis Gymnophoria

    I suppose that means the four 10-year-old Korean kids running around one of the sculptures screaming their heads off were part of the exhibit.

    If you SCREAM in Korean, there’s nothing wrong with that – because it’s scientific.

  • Jieun K

    the four 10-year-old Korean kids running around one of the sculptures screaming their heads off

    I hear you, but the blind eye to the little spoiled bunch may have been owing to the unlikelihood of the brats subjecting themselves to “behavior modification.” ;-)

  • keith

    I speak quietly, but I have been on a bus with American and Canadian friends (who do often tend to speak too loudly) and have seen them being hushed and being told to quieten down a little bit. You don’t need to shout, we’re not all deaf and nobody else on the bus-subway wants to particularly hear your inane drivel.

    No need to hit the old guy though. I just ignore idiots no matter what their age, ethnicity or nationality. Hitting someone should always be a last resort to any civilised person.

    I think Koreans are often sensitive to ‘foreign’ voices being loud simply through them not understanding. Give the fact that Koreans are often very noisy people it’s rather odd. Going to the supermarket here, it’s very noisy, and probably has a similar dB level as going to a rave party! Loud Karaoke on long bus journeys! Bongo truck drivers playing tapes at ridiculous levels informing potential customers they can buy some delicious onions! Opening a new store and blasting the neighbourhood with inane Kpoop for 18 hours a day! Religious lunatics and salesmen selling junk on the subway, screaming about jesus or some cheap piece of crap subway tat! Koreans are noisy themselves and are just as noisy when they take vacations abroad.

    Older Korean males often like to be bossy to foreigners or younger people. I had an old Korean bloke tell me ‘No Smoking!’ in a rather rude tone the other day. There were no signs saying no smoking, he wasn’t any kind of official, there were dozens of Koreans smoking all around the area and dropping their butts (I get rid of mine responsibly). He was just being a bossy prick. Did I punch him? No, I just raised my eyebrows, shrugged my shoulders and ignored him. Perhaps it was a special no smoking white guys area? I don’t know and care even less.

    Saying that the American guy was still obviously out of order for hitting the oldish man.

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    I’m curious: are Koreans bothered more by foreigners being loud than by Koreans being being loud?

    Speaking strictly for myself, I am annoyed more when I hear loud noises in a different language than the language spoken in the background. For example:

    - Loud English in Korea = more annoying than loud Korean in Korea.
    - Loud Korean in America = more annoying than loud English in America.
    - Loud Chinese in America = more annoying than loud English in America.

    etc.

    For the most part, I think this is because I can only ignore the background noise in one language at a time.

  • cm

    Having rode Seoul metro on many occasions, I find that it’s one of the quietest places in Seoul. Korean metro is one of the few places where passengers can get a brief moment of shut eye, after a hard stressful long day.

  • Charles Tilly

    Having rode Seoul metro on many occasions, I find that it’s one of the quietest places in Seoul. Korean metro is one of the few places where passengers can get a brief moment of shut eye, after a hard stressful long day.

    That really depends on the line. If you’re on the #2 or #3 line, then what you just said is total BS. However, you could make a case for the #6 line (at least when I was living in Seoul; circa 2004-2006).

    And please, stop calling it “metro.” I hate that shit. Just say subway. Okay? You and I won’t agree on the issue of social welfare but we should at least agree with regards to this. SUBWAY!!!!!!!.

  • R. Elgin

    “cm”, you really have not ridden the green line. It is so loud with the newer trains and their loudspeakers and the people talking so loudly that I put in earplugs almost every time I take the subway.
    The refurbished subway stations are like hell too. They put in speakers on all their advertising and it is just noise pollution. The klaxon for announcing trains is loud. It is all f****** too loud.

  • brier

    I see this as an alteration between two egos gone physical. Book the guy, throw the book at him and move on. Lots of wasted ink spent, and needless typing happening.

  • R. Elgin

    “Avaast” if it is any consolation to you, when I went to the Sadang branch of the 서울시립미술관 (Nam Seoul), they were very nice, helpful and fun to talk to. I have had nothing but pleasant experiences there and always go back every few months.

  • hamel

    One of the most useful lessons I got upon arrival in Korea was given to me by two 20-something US white guys who took me around on the subway and shushed me saying “you’re too loud.”

    They helped me to understand that a foreign language always sounds louder than your own tongue in an enclosed space (such as public transport).

    I in turn have shushed a very loud (even by my raucous standards) Canadian guy who was shouting into his cell phone while I was traveling with him.

  • hamel

    Oh, that is also in answer to Granfalloon.

  • JLEE

    I’m a Korean college student. I see there’re some young Koreans(might be college students too) in the bus. I don’t understand why nobody tried to stop him with telling him ‘니가’ means ‘you’ in Korean. Then maybe the disturbance would settled without assault.

    The black dude is a$$hole indeed but I also see the futility of English education in Korea. Those students have been learned English for a decade in their school but nobody can speak a short English sentence? So when they are going to use their hardly studied English in real life? Just sad.

  • aaronm

    The kid is a candidate for extinction. I can’t believe a moron such as that is teaching English to kids, or do they have gangsta thug life ebonics hagwons now?

  • cm

    JLEE, please read the article that Robert posted, it should put to rest that nobody did anything.

    http://news.khan.co.kr/kh_news/khan_art_view.html?artid=201108291202141&code=940202

  • Fullslab

    “Elderly,” who started such dribble? A 61 year old man is NOT elderly, I thought Korean males were somehow more fit than westerners yet at the rate S. Korea is going they will be classified as “elderly”(give me that GOVERNMENT $$$) long before American males regardless of having only ONE(easy) job in their life. The common Korean male thinks, get a good job, keep it for life and who really cares about my output. One of my students told me today that his SALES boss tells him to STOP selling and sometimes THREATENS him to stressful levels to DECREASE sales. How much dead weight does S. Korea hold?
    Finally, could a 61 year old “elderly” Korean beat the Marmot on Namsan any day of the week with or without the Hanbok running outfit?

  • hamel

    fullslab:

    I’ll give it to ya. But that’s the thing, it only happens when they tell ya something. Maybe the guy gets told to shut up everytime he’s on the bus no matter how soft he speaks and he’s tired of it. How can you talk to anyone on the bus and not be heard by someone else unless you whisper or get close and speak in their ear? If he had spoken softly into his Korean girlfriend’s ear, his girlfriend would’ve been called – 흑인 차별 대우 폐지론자 a nigger lover.

    I see now, Fullslab, you are just a parody blogger. For a moment you had me there. :))

  • aaronm

    Older Korean males often like to be bossy to foreigners or younger people.

    Right you are, but many of them have earned the right, in my opinion. Most sacrificed their best years working hard to educate their kids for crap wages and forewent many of the luxuries the current generation takes for granted. Without them, Korea would not be half the place it is today. Most of them weren’t allowed to travel abroad, even if they had the means, so they’re bound to be a bit funny towards foreigners. When I was first in Korea I’d burr up (but never use violence) to someone who told me what to do, but after a while you learn to nod and say ‘ney’ and preserve the social order for the sake of a quiet life.

  • hamel

    I feel the need to get some things straight:
    1) I don’t think that the man said to him “니가…” that was misinterpreted as “n…..” partly because when I listen to the young American rant, he doesn’t rant about being called a bad word. He DOES, however, repeat “shut up” several times, followed by a cackling laugh, and then a victorious claim of having “shut up” the older man. The “니가…” story appears to be a later apocryphal interpolation by a Korean commenter to a news story/video.

    2) I don’t think the suspect was with a girlfriend or a friend, because we don’t see any person on the video who is clearly with him. I think it more likely that he was talking on the phone.

    3) Metropolitician is clearly right when he says that the fight started some time before this video started to be taken. Only the bus’ CCTV camera will have the whole altercation, but without sound.

    It is likely that the ESL teacher was gabbing loudly (or normal voice – foreign languages sound louder in enclosed spaces) when the man told him to “shut up” and maybe not in a friendly tone. This sets the stage for what came after.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Finally, could a 61 year old “elderly” Korean beat the Marmot on Namsan any day of the week with or without the Hanbok running outfit?

    He probably COULD beat me up the mountain. How that justifies me (36) assaulting him (61) for saying something I didn’t like, I don’t know, unless you live by a really effed up moral code.

  • Fullslab

    # 81 Dokdo forever,
    I agree with you that most Koreans could care less about foreigners learning Korean. If fact I’d doubt foreigners want other foreigners to learn Korean as well. For example…
    # 115 Mryouknowwho,
    stated “…I feel that the better my Korean gets (TOPIK Level 4 baby!), the easier it is for me to confront Koreans in their language whether it be my fault, theirs, or a simple misunderstanding.
    Conversely, when I first arrived in Korea and began learning Korean, it was impossible for me to determine if someone was being rude to me outside of standard cuss words. I told myself to give Koreans the benefit of the doubt, as long as I didn’t fully understand the situation.”

    Congrats “Mryouknowwho( ! ),” but I don’t know Korean. I just wonder why those Korean speakers at Marmot’s Hole don’t congratulate you unless they REALLY don’t care even though they often proclaim to almost everyone LEARN KOREAN if you’re going to live in Korea and while the headline to this thread/posting is…”To Foreigners in Korea: Please learn a little Korean”

  • cm

    Someone tell Fullstab, it’s not acceptable to beat anyone, including a 61 years old young guy in his prime. I don’t care if he was 24, 40, or 61, it’s not acceptable to beat someone so senselessly over some rude remark. He could have just screamed “shut up yourself”, and walked away and it would have been end of story. But no, he starts to beat up the man when clearly he has stopped talking. Behave like an animal, you’ll be treated like an animal, racism or not.

    PS: remind me never to sit beside Metropolitician on a bus. After reading his latest post, I’ve decided he’s a ticking time bomb ready to go off.

  • YangachiBastardo

    Right you are, but many of them have earned the right, in my opinion. Most sacrificed their best years working hard to educate their kids for crap wages and forewent many of the luxuries the current generation takes for granted

    Indeed, what i find truly appalling about Korean society is the way elders are treated, particularly considering the fact it is a Confucian country

  • Fullslab

    cm # 100,
    As unacceptable as it is for you to call a 61 year old man “elderly” for goodness sakes. YOU are the one who tabbed him as “elderly” first correct?

  • Fullslab

    cm # 145,
    Where did I say it’s okay to “beat” or assault someone, I didn’t think so :)

  • cm

    Here’s a posting who says she was the woman in the bus who tried to stop the attack. Now I don’t know if this is really her, or some trolling effort. But it sounds real at least.

    She calls the attacker a “crazy bastard”. She says she didn’t hear any racist remarks, but asks anyone else heard more. The black man talking in the cell phone with extremely unbearable loud voice as soon as he got on the bus, in front of that Korean man who asked him to be quiet. The man ignored the Korean man, and continued to talk loud. That’s when the Korean man said “Please shut up” (so he did say “please”). She writes the attacker tried to strangle the Korean man, and the on-lookers intervened to pull him away. They pulled him away to disembark him from the bus, but the dude broke free and ran up to the old man again and continue to beat his head, pull his hair, and strangle him. The onlookers tried to speak English to the attacker to talk some sense into him, but it was no use, as several men tried to contain him, but had a hard time restraining him, as he kept lunging at his target like a mad man. Everyone in the bus were scared stiff, but another woman tried to intervene and somebody prevented her from doing so.

    Like I said, I can’t verify the source of this article. It could be a post to make it look like the attacker was a total animal and to direct racist attacks, or it could be really true. I don’t know so I’ll let the readers decide if this has some validity or not.

    http://todayhumor.co.kr/board/view.php?kind=&ask_time=&search_table_name=&table=humorbest&no=383072&page=1&keyfield=&keyword=&mn=&nk=&ouscrap_keyword=&ouscrap_no=&s_no=383072&member_kind=

  • cm

    #147, you have more problems with my calling of a 61 year old as an elderly… well wow..

    In my books, 61 years old is enough to be a grandfather. He probably is too.
    So a 24 year old beating up a grandpa who’s twice as smaller just because he said “shut up”, how does that make this incident jutifiable? What do you want me to say Fullstab? Since foreigners are treated so badly by Koreans, it’s open season on rude grandpas? Isn’t that what you and some others are saying here?

  • Fullslab

    Robert Koehler # 17,
    Please express my sincere apology to cm(I’m sorry) for suggesting he may have tabbed the 61 year old man as “elderly” when in fact YOU did in # 17 unless I’m mistaken?
    Robert, in one of your other not so bright posts(#40) you tried acting as Judge and Jury before your 1st update(there has been at least 2 updates), and then began stereotyping Americans by saying…”Ask pretty much anyone on the planet, and they’ll tell you, AMERICANS ARE TOO EFFING LOUD.”

    You, and now(unfortunately) others should know that by stereotyping “AMERICANS ARE TOO EFFING LOUD.” That means you must believe that more than 50 million Americans—about 17 percent of the population—who will be 65 or older in 2020 also qualify as “TOO EFFING LOUD.”
    Thus, you are calling approximately 50 million “ELDERLY AMERICANS ARE TOO EFFING LOUD.”
    Congrats Robert Koehler(AKA Marmot’s Hole)!

  • Charles Tilly

    With the video of the black dude flipping out on the bus and Usain Bolt getting disqualified for a false start at Daegu, it hasn’t been all that peachy for black folks in Korea.

  • komtengi

    The Korean media has now named the guy in question. In one article they name him and then refer to him as Mr H afterwards. This is about to get alot messier now it seems.

  • Fullslab

    152, maybe that black folk Bolt in Korea wanted to get out of dodge ASAP?

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    There is no excuse for this guy getting so thuggish, even if the Koreans were calling him names. And the fact that he’s an American, in my opinion, makes it that much worse.

    We are the greatest nation in the world. And if our President behaved like that guy did, we’d be attacking countries that dis… wait… nevermind…

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    But the guy should still be prosecuted, incarcerated, and deported. Then prosecuted again when he gets back home.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    What are the marks of a sick culture?

    It is a bad sign when the people of a country stop identifying themselves with the country and start identifying with a group. A racial group. Or a religion. Or a language. Anything, as long as it isn’t the whole population.

    A very bad sign. Particularism. It was once considered a Spanish vice but any country can fall sick with it. Dominance of males over females seems to be one of the symptoms.

    Before a revolution can take place, the population must loose faith in both the police and the courts.

    High taxation is important and so is inflation of the currency and the ratio of the productive to those on the public payroll. But that’s old hat; everybody knows that a country is on the skids when its income and outgo get out of balance and stay that way – even though there are always endless attempts to wish it way by legislation. But I started looking for little signs and what some call silly-season symptoms.

    I want to mention one of the obvious symptoms: Violence. Muggings. Sniping. Arson. Bombing. Terrorism of any sort. Riots of course – but I suspect that little incidents of violence, pecking way at people day after day, damage a culture even more than riots that flare up and then die down. Oh, conscription and slavery and arbitrary compulsion of all sorts and imprisonment without bail and without speedy trial – but those things are obvious; all the histories list them.

    I think you have missed the most alarming symptom of all. This one I shall tell you. But go back and search for it. Examine it. Sick cultures show a complex of symptoms as you have named… But a dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness. Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters. A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than a riot.

    This symptom is especially serious in that an individual displaying it never thinks of it as a sign of ill health but as proof of his/her strength. Look for it. Study it. It is too late to save this culture – this worldwide culture, not just the freak show here in California. Therefore we must now prepare the monasteries for the coming Dark Age. Electronic records are too fragile; we must again have books, of stable inks and resistant paper.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    oops, previous was from Robert Heinlein…

  • MrMao

    Don’t forget tortured.

    He starts to scream ‘Niga’ back at the old man. And yeah, I don’t really see any evidence of him being with a friend/girlfriend. The strangling thing, well, it’s not inconceivable.

    Dear Korea,

    It’s not acceptable to tell anyone to ‘Shut up.’ Ever. It is also grammatically impossible to ask them to ‘Please Shut Up.’ If you are determined to use that phrase, be aware that you may have to defend yourself. Stop using the language you learn in…whatever horrid crap you guys are buying from the Americans these days. This means you too, Grandpa on the bus.

    Kisses,

    MrMao

  • john in la

    NOW, EVERYONE in Korea knows the n word.

  • john in la

    #141,
    Yes the older Korean folks deserve the right to be a little bossy over the younger ones. There’d be no S Korea of today if they didn’t slave away their best years in the factories/shipyards/street.

  • john in la

    Actually saw the clip. yeah, he was acting COMPLETELY as a thug. One wants to be a thug? Expect to be treated like a thug and deported like a thug.

    I’m actually kinda impressed the older man stood up to face him, not that he had anywhere to turn to get away from the thug, in the confined space.

  • _OZ_

    I just got back from Korea. I wash I had been on that bus. I’d give him someone to pick on. Unbelievable! No excuse for his shitty behavior.
    I was on a bus with a group of Americans and one of them got loud. I told him to be quiet. He didnt like it but too bad.
    Bottom line, you are a guest in THEIR country. Learn the customs, courtesies and some of the language and all sides will benefit.

  • http://dok.do/4lur41 Apodyopsis Gymnophoria

    Most developed world countries have accepted the chronological age of 65 years as a definition of ‘elderly’ or older person, but the UN agreed cutoff is 60+ years to refer to the older population.

    What is chronologically, Elderly?”

    Being past middle age and approaching old age;

    somewhat old; near old age:

    The term elderly (also known as ‘old age’ or ‘older people’) is used to describe the last period of time in human life.

    rather old; especially : being past middle age

    somewhat old; past middle age; approaching old age; quite old; already in old age; aged;

    to AARP = age 55

    to the airlines = 65

    to Social Security= age 65 to 67

    To me elderly isn’t really an age it is more a state of mind and behavior.

  • http://askakorean.blogspot.com thekorean

    It is too late to save this culture – this worldwide culture, not just the freak show here in California. Therefore we must now prepare the monasteries for the coming Dark Age. Electronic records are too fragile; we must again have books, of stable inks and resistant paper.

    Yet another commenter blows what little respectability he had into high heavens. I guess if we leave them alone long enough, they end up reveal themselves on their own.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    Mr Mao, ‘Please Shut Up.’ ;-) /jk

    Korea currently belongs to the Koreans, not the American, Chinese, Japanese, or Canadiens. Everyone else there is only a guest. The guestd should use their “indoor voices” and commonly-accepted “good manners” when they visit Korea (or anywhere else). Abusing the elderly and/or women is ___always___ wrong.

    And the thug’s physical actions of violence and intimidation completely override any possible guilt the old man and young girl might have borne for their commentary, however rude or misunderstood…

    Korea can be very frustrating for the waygook. But that is no reason to do things you wouldn’t do in front of your own family. And if he would do this in front of his family, shame on them, too.

    I’m not in favor of taking him out and shooting him; but he needs to learn rather sharply not to behave like a petulant two-year old…

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    thekorean is obviously smarter than Robert Heinlein…

  • Charles Tilly

    oops, previous was from Robert Heinlein…

    Hey shitnaffa: Speaking as a Robert Heinlein fan (The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress and Stranger in a Strange Land), it would be nice if a world class imbecile such as yourself didn’t besmirch a great man’s name by using his quotes to advance whatever batshit crazy ideas that are floating around in your head.

    Just stop and go fuck off, nitwit.

  • YangachiBastardo

    I read once a Heinlein book (think it was called Universe or something like that) as i read on a magazine one of my favourite anime of all times was vaguely inspired by it…it bored me to tears, not shit for a 16 years old

  • CactusMcHarris

    The guy lost it over a perceived slight. There’s no excuse, though, for the abuse he dished out.

    #164 CT,

    It’s too bad for you continually not being able to grok civility, too.

  • cm

    #159, MrMao:

    “Dear Korea, It’s not acceptable to tell anyone to ‘Shut up.’ Ever. It is also grammatically impossible to ask them to ‘Please Shut Up.’”

    Well, it was my loose translation. The Korean man said “shut up please”. Does that make things better?.. not. The part about “he did say please” was my attempt at humor. If he wasn’t restrained, the man could have been facing murder charges, because looking at the video, he really does seems to be starting to strangle the man. Just think what would have been, it could have been far worse.

    Again, I’m quoting from the same source I can’t verify.

    She said:

    흑인이 갑자기 흥분해서 한국어로도 씨팔새끼야 라고 욕 하는 둥 영어와 함께 욕설을 퍼붓기 시작했고

    The black guy suddenly got angry and started verbally abusing the Korean with “shipalseki” and a mixture of Korean and English swear words.

    할아버지도 당황하셔서 시끄러우니까 좀 조용히 해달라고 내가 영어가 짧아서 그런다.

    The grandpa was taken a back, and said in Korean, “I wanted to tell you to settle down because it was too loud but my English was not good enough”.

    라고 말씀은 하셨는데 미친놈이 한국어를 알아들을바 없으니 흥분을 가라앉히지 않았습니다.

    But this crazy bastard couldn’t understand Korean so he couldn’t be calmed down.

    –end

  • cm

    The part about “he did say please” was my attempt at humor. But Yes the grandpa really did say “please”, according to this source, I wasn’t joking.

  • PGT3

    Enough of the bs Koreans are generally speaking extremely ethno-centric and out right racist. Certainly that doesn’t speak to everyone but in my experiences this is the case. I’ve taught plenty of classes where I’ve had to reprimand students for making flammatory racist comments against blacks, jews, latinos, you name it. It’s said too because they’re learning all that ignorant racism at home. I agree foreigners should do a little more to learn the language, but Koreans should also be a little more welcoming, which might motivate people to do so.

  • MrMao

    Korea can be very frustrating for the waygook. But that is no reason to do things you wouldn’t do in front of your own family.

    - Actually, there is. It’s the double-standard inherent in this attitude:

    Korea currently belongs to the Koreans, not the American, Chinese, Japanese, or Canadiens. Everyone else there is only a guest.

    - Arrogance begets arrogance. You step up, you get beat down. Just like Grandpa did. Koreans demand to be addressed with the right level of honorific and are violent to those who fail to do so. That’s exactly what happened here.

  • MrMao

    cm, thank you for the careful translation. ‘shut up’ was actually written in English in that Korean news article as what Mr H said.

  • PineForest

    If the Korean man told the American man to shut up, then I would say he bit off more than he could chew and may have deserved what he got.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Fullslab: I don’t often ask my commenters for favors, but if you’d be so kind, please put my mind at ease by confirming that the subject you teach your students is something other than English.

    PineForest:

    If the Korean man told the American man to shut up, then I would say he bit off more than he could chew and may have deserved what he got.

    A 61-year-old man deserved to get verbally and physically assaulted by a 24-year-old because he told him to shut up? Really?

    komtengi — Assuming you’re referring to the same paper I just read, it wouldn’t be the first time for them to name the perp.

    Oh, and the Dong-A reports that a) the suspect has been in Korea for only six months and lives in Bundang; b) he wasn’t drunk, and is cooperating with police; and c) the victim suffered injuries that will take two weeks to heal.

    http://news.donga.com/3/all/20110830/39908860/1

  • hamel

    #159, MrMao:

    “Dear Korea, It’s not acceptable to tell anyone to ‘Shut up.’ Ever. It is also grammatically impossible to ask them to ‘Please Shut Up.’”

    The only thing grammatically wrong about the above is that it is all capitalized, and there is no comma after “Please.” Apart from that, there is no grammatical impossibility at all.

    Have some people here lost their senses? Overnight, this thread has really devolved into something quite silly (my apologies to those like cm who have been valiantly trying to keep it about the incident in question).

    Oh, and to EVERYBODY, it seems clear to me that fullslab is a parody troll. Please, don’t respond feed the troll.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    So… is Miss Tilly a defender of rudeness? Or did she misread the Heinlein quote?

  • hamel

    Robert

    regarding parody troller Fullslab, see #151, where he uses 5 sets of parentheses with no space before each. This is a common stylistic mistake employed by whom, when they use parentheses?

  • CactusMcHarris

    Yuna above used 아저씨(아주머니 or 할머니) 오지랖이 하늘과 같이 넓으시군요.

    What does 오지랖 mean?

    (my dictionary doesn’t count that high)

    Thanks,

    jh

  • milton

    I don’t have so much as even the slightest desire to take a side in this issue, but I’m curious: are Koreans bothered more by foreigners being loud than by Koreans being being loud? Assume that loudness, age, context etc. are equal, and that “botheredness” is something we can quantify. What do you think?

    I don’t know how Koreans feel on the issue, but from my own experience I’ve found that North Americans in particular tend to be less cognizant of the volume of their voices and tend to belt things out when excited. . This isn’t necessarily a bothersome thing—except when everyone else in the venue is being quiet. It’s kinda like that guy who’s whispering during a movie. Foreigners also tend to be unaware of the fact that it’s considered good decorum here to use “indoor voices” on public transit.

    Based on my own non-scientific experience, I find the most egregious noise offenders are groups of 20-something North Americans and groups of Korean females in their early-to-mid teens. Both are equally obnoxious.

  • Granfalloon

    Well played, hamel.

  • hamel

    Cactus: luckily, mine does:

    오지랖(이) 넓다
    (관용)be interfering[meddlesome, intrusive, obtrusive]
    오지랖이 넓다
    be nosy

    3개 뜻 더보기 : be nosy

  • hardyandtiny

    Saw the term “ppikki” mentioned and I’m curious. Is a “삐끼” a person who stands outside of a club/bars and tries to get people to come inside? Like a nightclub hawker?

  • Pingback: Confusion surrounds Korean-foreigner subway altercation | Asian Correspondent

  • αβγδε

    WTF? LOL.

    That guy on the bus not only carries himself like a low-class asshat, but dresses like one, sounds like one. Dude, get a fucking hair cut. And stop idolozing Lil Wayne, you retard. How in the hell did this guy get employed?

    And I’m surprised the Metropolitician is still referring to himself as a black. The guy is a fucking happa, and looks like one, and acts like he’s 100% soul brotha on his blog, rarely if ever giving any indication otherwise.

    But, anyway, if this an example of one, I know of several cases in America where the Korean word “niga” has been mistaken for the n word — and has lead to same sort of rash, physical, self-righteous behavior you see in the case of the black guy here.

  • hamel

    hardy: correct. The term is apparently borrowed from Japanese.

  • αβγδε

    I just want to add that when it comes to foreigners in Korea, a Korean should be able to empathize what it would it feel like to have a son, brother, or friend in a foreign country. Treat these people in your nation as you would want others to treat your child in a foreign nation.

    Be kind to the stranger, because sometimes we’re strangers too. – Sean Penn, We’re No Angels.

    But, hey, no one has to be kind to grandstanding, loud and obnoxious asshats who look like Lil Wayne. Nope. The golden rule does not apply here, or should it be, herr.

  • VonSchlongDon

    “The whole thing is a tragedy born out of ignorance. Korean elder’s lack of English knowledge and the traveler’s misunderstanding of Korean language.

    Tragedy born out of ignorance.”

    Wait, how is the Korean man’s lack of English knowledge = ignorance? Personally I think it’s ignorant as well as arrogant to think that everyone in every nation should know how to speak English.

  • http://kuiwon.wordpress.com/ kuiwon

    But, hey, no one has to be kind to grandstanding, loud and obnoxious asshats who look like Lil Wayne. Nope. The golden rule does not apply here, or should it be, herr.

    “Tru dat.”

  • Arghaeri

    ? It’s simple, that ain’t the way it is within the Korean

    I don’t know where you live Fullslab, but it ain’t no place in korea I recognize and I been all over.

    You must have some pretty off-putting body language.

  • R. Elgin

    Every last one of you who have made comments about foreigners or Americans being too loud and obnoxious in public seem extremely naive and I question the validity of your “observations”.
    I have to endure some of the loudest and rudest public phone calls, conversations and guys wearing loudspeakers on their belts, on the subway — now in Seoul —, courtesy of LOUD KOREANS, who end up getting my direct, full-on stare. This happens even when I have my 3-M earplugs in, which means they are very loud and all other Koreans just ignore them.
    After ten years of using public transportation, I can not say that foreigners exhibit this tendency more than others either; empirically, I find that to be untrue and I think that most average Koreans would agree.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    Re Update #21;

    So does that mean that anytime I hear someone from south of Daegu engaged in a shouting match conversation, I can tell them to “shut the fish mouth”?

  • R. Elgin

    “Sperwer”, you can do that while I stand behind you eating an apple, watching because I just want to see the look on their faces . . .

  • CactusMcHarris

    #184 hamel,

    Thank you, sir. Given that, isn’t Yuna’s suggestion a little obnoxious-yet-polite? I like it.

  • john in la

    #192
    I hear you about loud people, Koreans AND non-Koreans. The issue here is the thug threatened (or carried out) physical assault.

    Being loud and yelling at some to shut is not same as threatening physical assault or actually assaulting someone.

  • R. Elgin

    “I hear you about loud people, Koreans AND non-Koreans. The issue here is the thug threatened (or carried out) physical assault.”
    Apparently I need to type this LOUDER “john” so that you will not try to twist my meaning. I comment only on my experiences of ten years or so of being forced to listen to native Koreans, who are typically louder than anyone else in the subway.

  • cm

    What’s not shown on that video is the fact that this confrontation inside the bus went on for over 20 minutes. The passengers were terrorized scared stiff, as the angry man overpowered the people who were trying to hold him back. Now, I know if you had a bad day you can feel like punching out a wise cracking ill mannered grandpa, but holy cow.. 20 minutes worth of trying to strangle and punch the man and put 2 weeks worth of healing time on the guy??

    As for the “니가 여기 앉아” confusion. I believe this happened, reading the reports. The black man was talking on the cell phone, standing close to the Korean man who was sitting down, above the Korean man’s head. After the “shut up please”, the black man gave the WTF look, the Korean man probably gave the “니가 여기 앉아” comment – “you sit here”. I think he meant “you sit here and I can’t hack listening to this noise – I’ll stand and you sit”. So I think he really was offering the seat to him, but not quite in a generous manner.

  • silver surfer

    hamel @142: good point.

    We did not get to see the beginning of this. Ajossis (and that’s what he *looked* like, rather than an ‘elderly’ man) are known for invading personal space, giving orders, ignoring all signals that the attention is not welcome, and refusing to leave people alone. Try that in any of our home countries and you’ll pretty soon get your arse kicked.

    Of course, we didn’t see whether that’s what this ajossi did either. Maybe he did say ‘Please shut up’ which is unnecessarily confrontational (if so, the newspapers are spreading the wrong English lesson: ‘니가’ is not the problem, using the phrase ‘shut up’ on a stranger is). But maybe that was because he was taking a stand on this foreigner’s unacceptably loud talking on the phone. Again, we didn’t get to see how loudly this black guy was talking or what the ajossi said to him initially.

    So, who started it? That’s all I’d like to know.

  • cm

    #199, there’s a distinct possibility the Korean man did know “shut up” could be construed as an insulting manner to foreigners. The Korean forums are debating this as well, as a few number of Koreans are educating the fellow Koreans that a “shut up” to a stranger is terribly offensive. The fact that the grandpa said “please” after the “shut up”, and the fact that he said in Korean “my English isn’t good enough” when the angry man began the verbal assault maybe because the Korean man just realized he made a mistake. Maybe he meant to say “조용히 해주세요” which essentially means “can you please pipe down?”, and the only English that came to his mind was the “shut up please”.

    So my next question is, if that’s the case, what if the Korean said “조용히 해주세요”, instead of “shut up please”? Does the Korean man still get the beating of his life, and would he still deserve it?

    Another question, if this happened in the West, and I ask you “can you please tone down your voice?” in a public transportation, I’m not sure what kind of response I would get. Maybe that’s still considered rude, or not?

  • cm

    oops, correction:

    there’s a distinct possibility the Korean man did (NOT) know “shut up” could be construed as an insulting phrase to foreigners.

  • silver surfer

    @198

    20 minutes? In that case, I’m going to have to come off the fence and say he’s a thug.

  • silver surfer

    @200

    Asking someone to keep it down on public transport is perfectly reasonable, and reacting aggressively to such a request is not.

  • silver surfer

    I meant the phrase “can you please tone down your voice?” is fine.

  • cm

    #200, the Korean man’s injury was to the neck – bruised mark around it which will take couple of weeks to heal. He was being strangled with bare hands. That’s another thing I ask people to think about. Punching out somebody is one thing, but strangling him enough, to leave some serious bruise marks??

  • iMe

    Nothing amuses me more than a bunch of self-righteous foreigners trying to educate the locals on what is right or wrong. That reminds me. I should go over to my neighbor’s house and tell him what to do and what not to do in his own house. He’s a real primitive motherf*cker but I will enlighten him even if I have to whup his ass in his own home.

  • http://www.racecarcreative.com seouliva

    I’m a little late in the comment game, but I did read through the majority above. I’m still curious about a few things:
    1) Where is this “girlfriend” he was talking too loudly with?
    2) The bus is packed. Where was he supposed to sit? How would the old guy give up his seat being next to the window? and why??
    3) Why is it assumed the woman was “protecting” the old man? I think she was just protecting herself, scared to death being in the middle.
    I totally think the guy is a thug as well. But there are some big gaps in the story that we will never know.

  • cm

    1) He was talking on the phone (no mention if that was his girlfriend on line)

    2) It was probably a figurative speech to make a point. “you try to be in my seat and see how you like it”, or maybe he meant “I can’t stand sitting here listening to this noise, why don’t you take my seat”.

    3) Because she was, look at the video. She was screaming “stop it”, when the black man lunges at the Korean man. She was also probably scared, being in the middle.

    More on this from here

    http://news.kbs.co.kr/society/2011/08/30/2348307.html

    The same paper is now quoting Metropolitician’s post about Korean racism. Anyone in Korea confirm that his website is being censored by the ministry of education (he says some user has reported this to him).

    The black English teacher has gone back to teaching kids, and the Hagwon spokesman says he’s very sorry about this.

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  • http://populargusts.blogspot.com/ bulgasari

    @208
    That was me who sent it to him – Here’s what it looks like to me:
    http://img198.imageshack.us/img198/3235/smoemetro.jpg

    I should note though, that I’m at work right now, and SMOE regularly bans certain sites to make them difficult to access from school computers. At one point a lot of school related teaching materials were hosted at mediafire, which was great until SMOE decided to block that site…

  • shiweibo

    I think it’s a mistake to write off foreign languages as “loud.”
    Rather, I think what the phenomenon is is that being in a country where practically no one can understand you positions you in such a place where you lose the motivation to try to keep your voice down (because no one can comprehend what your saying). I mean, I’m not saying this is always the case, but I noticed after some time in China that I was increasingly beginning to raise my voice more and more as the months went by (and I’m a painfully, despicably, soft-spoken guy). But really, I found that the reason was my constant attempt at adaptation to the Chinese way of conversation, which is pretty louder than what I was accustomed to. I think this happens in Korea as well. I think it has nothing to do with language or being in Asia, as it has to do with being in cities of more that 9-10 (about 20 in Shanghai’s case) million people. It gets to a point where you just stop caring. As much as there’s a double standard in Korea, there is on in the US as well. In fact, this could happen anywhere. My point being that the “all American’s are loud and obnoxious” stereotype is bullshit. Not because I’m American and find it really irritating, but because it is. EVERYONE is loud. Period.

    I do find it deplorable that this man reacted in this way. Why? Because he had an opportunity to actually offer the man a real teaching moment. How could he have handled this? If the issue was being told to shut up; Can you please not talk to me in that manner, I don’t care for it. It’s rude, and I’m NOT going to listen to you. If the issue was mistaking “니가” then he should have addressed this concern; “Don’t call me that. I don’t know you…blah, blah, blah. My point being, the guy should have actually tried talking first.

    Also, I don’t buy for an instant that this all flared up because of him mistaking “니가”
    1) if that’s the case, then I’ve been saying 니가 incorrectly, because it does not sound enough like the N word to engender this kind of confusion. Honestly, I’ve been called that enough in my lifetime to KNOW when someone is actually calling me that…Trust me, you know.
    2) the guy’s teaching in Korea, he KNOWS what fucking 니가 means…come on. This is total BS. I’m not saying he’s fluent, but COME.ON! You’re seriously trying to convince me he didn’t know a simple pronoun? Anyone who listens to about 5 Kpop songs could figure out it means “you” or that it’s at least a pronoun.

    He simply didn’t like that the Ajjussi was trying to assert his authority over him and overacted. I mean, something HAS to be up for someone to react in that way. I don’t care how “thuggish” we’ve already decided he must be. People don’t just react that way for no reason. There’s undoubtedly more to the story; however, he fucked up. For himself, and for every other non-white person who spends time in Korea.

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  • http://www.caseyradio.org nayacasey

    shiweibo, I’m not sure about that “니가,” but it does remind me of Redd Foxx saying that he reaches for his knife when he hears white people pronounce the first syllable of “Niagara.” About a decade ago, an aide to DC mayor Williams resigned when some sensitive staff members got upset when he said the word “niggardly” in a staff meeting.

  • yuna

    It’s the American accent that’s loud. I have an American friend who, after living a number of years in Europe, tries to avoid sitting in the same train compartment if he can from the other Americans. Once he got approached by a American man on a train in Europe who asked him “Are you American?” so he denied it by shaking his head, he said.

    Another time I was in a queue at the airport when we were all snowed in (maybe Berlin or Stockholm). A woman who looked like a NY jewish pop science writer (you know, in her 40′s attractive, mahogany curly hair, small frame) was complaining like hell to the girl at the desk, in that particularly, “fed up with this shit” nasal tone born of a fly and a mosquito copulating, going on and on…about some window seat or something so that the whole airport could hear. I was behind her in the queue. She suddenly turned to me and said,
    “EXCUSE ME COULD I HAVE SOME PERSONAL SPACE HERE?”
    I was so shocked I couldn’t come back with the retort I thought of when I was fuming in the plane “As soon as you give me back my personal auditory space, yes!”

    Talking of nosey people, the same expat community exists in Germany who complain that German strangers who like to tell people, especially the foreign-looking ones how to do things properly ALL THE TIME..

  • hardyandtiny

    “It’s the American accent that’s loud.”

    Which one?

  • yuna

    The nasal one.

  • Yu Bum Suk

    “The black English teacher has gone back to teaching kids, and the Hagwon spokesman says he’s very sorry about this.”

    Almost every contract has something about ‘disgraceful conduct’ being grounds for a dismissal. Surely if anything qualifies for that, this is it. It’s always astounded me what teachers do and don’t get fired for. Surely the parents would be complaining if he didn’t get the sack asap???

  • hardyandtiny

    Nasal is not an accent. Which American accent are you referring to?

  • YangachiBastardo

    Since we are on the subject of stereotyping, i don’t find Americans particularly obnoxious, even cos there are very small numbers of them around where i live. They honestly seem to me dressed in an absurd way and they sport absurd facial hair but sure that’s not a big concern.

    English and Russians instead i can’t fuckin stand ‘em. At least English tourists are non-existent around here (thanks God at least we’re not Spain or Cyprus and the pound is a piece of shit currency), Russians instead pretty much own us and it ain’t pretty. In some expensive resort areas they own pretty much all the villas cos well they have the money and they cluster next to eachother as nobody wants them as neighbours.

    Say what you want about them but the French instead are close to ideal tourists: mostly well behaved, happy-looking families, a bit introverted and absolutely respectful, Garmans are pretty much the same i have to admit.

    Asian tourists (except Mainland Chinese) are truly the best, they never ever cause half a problem, if anything they’re often victims of boorish behaviour. The thing that impress me is how they photograph even sites that look insignificant to me. I live in a very run down, ugly, dirty non-descript city, with pretty much nothing artistic in it and often i see scores of Japanese and Koreans filming like crazy, i mean like they landed in the middle of the Vatican Museums or something

  • yuna

    Say what you want about them but the French instead are close to ideal tourists

    Very unusual to see French tourists anywhere, they are such homebodies. They don’t need to travel, they have the best wine, women, everything.. Except, I once saw more number of French tourists in one day than I’d seen in my entire life and that was in Baden Baden, the spa resort, in one of the spa baths.

  • yuna

    Though, whether day-trippers qualify as tourists I’m not sure.

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  • _OZ_

    Sad that the mention of a word can put someone into such a rage. No matter what the Korean man said and no matter if he knowingly said “nigger” to the American, the American is completely wrong for physically assaulting an old couple. He had the power to keep the situation under control and he chose not to.
    Sad. I can say one word to a black man that has not ever been a slave, that has not had to worry about being lynched, and has been given the same opportunities to succeed as the majority of Americans and that word is 90% guaranteed to start a rage.

  • cm

    #210, “He simply didn’t like that the Ajjussi was trying to assert his authority over him and overacted.”

    Yes, that’s correct. And the African American isn’t the only one that this happened to. Koreans complain privately all the time about older Koreans asserting their authority in public. But they usually don’t lead to confrontations, because the older people are given a leeway. But I think we’re starting to see a breakdown in this social system, as more and more public conflicts between the young and the old are reported. Two cases this year brings to mind: One involved a 15 year old girl getting beat up in subway by a grandmother for using “banmal”. Another case was more recent where a mother of a young toddler beat up a grandmother for touching her young daughter (the grandmother found her cute and she was cooing over her), in a subway train. These videos were uploaded to streaming sites and caused a big ruckus in the news, while viewers ended up choosing sides. More and more public etiquette issues like these are cropping up and it’s making debates as to what is the appropriate behavior.

  • Charles Tilly

    English and Russians instead i can’t fuckin stand ‘em.

    Agree with regards to English tourists. God, what a foul, god damn fucking filthy little breed of vermin (English tourist: “Oh, but in jolly ol’ England….”; Me (thinking to myself): SHUT THE FUCK UP!!! Nobody give a shit you god damn TWIT!!!). But we’ll have to disagree when it comes to Russian tourists. At least the female variety. They’re not the only ones sight seeing ;)

  • john in la

    #197 @R. Elgin
    No matter what, the physical assault is inexcusable.

  • john in la

    #221
    The younger Koreans better bow down before the older Koreans. That single generation managed to lift a nation out of extreme poverty, the kind of poverty younger Koreans are clueless about.

  • shiweibo

    I’m not going so far as to blame the Ajjussi, but to be honest, he should have thought twice.
    If he really told that expat to shut up, he obviously knew what it meant. He had to. I’m not saying he deserved to be hit, but if you’re going to go around telling people what to do in such a manner…well, it’s just a matter of time.
    I remember riding the subway in Shanghai and literally being pushed out of the opening door because the person behind me was too impatient to wait for me to move…I turned to my friend and told him that if that guy had done that in the US (or, to the wrong American), he’d likely find himself with a black eye. Several YouTube videos later, he eventually believed me.

  • john in la

    #225
    Maybe. But the dude should’ve thought about talking loudly (no clip of that but witness tell he was talking loudly on his phone) in a confined space, late at night, at the hour of 11PM.

  • YangachiBastardo

    I turned to my friend and told him that if that guy had done that in the US (or, to the wrong American), he’d likely find himself with a black eye. Several YouTube videos later, he eventually believed me

    And if you’re an American and you try to pull that badass wannabe tough Yankee shit in say Brazil or Serbia very likely your life comes to an abrupt end….don’t you guys realise how mild (civilised) Asia is comparing to most places on this planet ?

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  • shiweibo

    #227 That was my point…

  • 8675309

    rolypoly@ 15:

    “It is such a unfortunate thing that no one can speak good English to explain to this man what is going on.”

    It would be nice too if the esteemed African-American “gentleman” in question spoke English as well. As far as I know, Ebonics hasn’t been recognized as English yet. (What was needed was an Ebonics-to-English-Korean translator, e.g., how exactly do you translate “boo0-yahh” in English, let alone Korean?)

  • ogunsiron

    I’m a black male myself and am extremely disappointed to see that even in Korea there are
    people in the group that I belong to who are acting exactly like they do in the USA,Canada,Europe
    and elsewhere.
    I also would like to take this opportunity to tear apart the following lame arguments, from
    another black male I suppose, who even living in Korea can’t find the courage to view things through a
    different lens than the usual “I’m a poor person of colour victim of discrimination” one.

    iNeville August 29, 2011 at 3:36 pm

    It’s a sad situation all around and I wish it hadn’t come to that. He makes black people look bad for the

    obvious reason that he’s a young man assaulting (verbally and physically) an elderly couple. But I find it also

    sad for reasons presumably not so obvious.
    1) It’s a sad because it’s a social commentary on how much has NOT changed in the world. I’d contend not

    much has changed when it comes to accepting others who are different from ourselves. And I loathe the term

    tolerate. I’m talking about acceptance not just putting up with or bearing with.

    The Koreans are AT HOME. In their own country. A country where they’ve been living for thousands of years. A country that they have themselves built. Blacks didn’t build it. You know how you may, if you want, let people into your home but you don’t HAVE to ? It’s the same
    with people in their own country. What makes you think koreans in their own damn country have this obligation to put you and your ways on an equal footing with their ways ?
    I’m not advocating being rude to foreigners at all but I am a firm believer in the difference between
    a native and a foreigner in a given country. Foreigners should be treated with respect and may even enjoy priviledges but they’re not
    home and have no business demanding “acceptance” from everyone.

    I also can’t help thinking that if black people had real countries that they could be proud of, they wouldn’t need to be “accepted” all the time. Think about iNeville.

    2) It’s sad because, Koreans are people of colour too and have been (and continue to be) subject to racism in a

    similar fashion although not as severe as blacks have been. So why inflict stereotypical judgments on other

    minorities? The common experience of prejudice should unite us rather than divide us

    That is pathetic !
    As far as I know, Koreans have a real identity. They have a recorded history that stretches several centuries if not millena. I’m no specialist but they seem to have a very rich and sophisticated culture.
    What i mean is that Koreans would have to be INSANE or grossly ignorant of their own identity to embrace that empty, fictitious, vacuous, made up identity (“people of colour”) that was spawned from ( I guess) the diseased mind of Frantz Fanon.
    Oh sure! Koreans, Blacks, Pakistanis, Australian aborigenes, Pygmies, amazon indians, lebanese people with blue eyes, armenians all the same! Hey, some people think even Spaniards belong in that group too!We’re all

    people of colour and our whole identity can be summed by “we’re oppressed by white racism and priviledge”. N*gga please !
    Please let the Koreans and other East-Asians be themselves ! They have historically been on par with Europeans
    and only in the past 150 years or so may have been somewhat outclassed by them. That phase didn’t even last very long. That “people of colour” identity is for losers. Black people should imitate east-asians, not drag
    them down into a grossly inferior level of identity like that of “oppressed people of colour”!

    It’s a human condition to fear what we don’t understand.


    Poor Koreans who don’t understand anything while us wise black folks undertand everything and everyone right ?

    Must be that oppression thing that gives us an incredibly keen insight into the human condition everywhere and in every country. We black people understand something about every other people. But it’s funny how other people seemingly can never perceive anything about black people. Whatever opinion they may form about us is always, by its very nature, inaccurate. right ?

    Are you sure that koreans don’t understand anything about black people ?

  • ogunsiron

    continued :

    It’s part of our primitive brain. But just like we’ve learned it’s not okay clobber a woman over the head, take

    her back to our cave and essentially rape her, I have faith that our cerebra will also learn to overrule our

    primitive and cerebellar fear of the unknown by simply seeking to make the unknown cerebrally known.

    Have you ever thought this through ?
    You really seem to believe that once one makes the effort to know foreigners/the Other, one always ends
    up appreciating said Others. Can you really not even imagine cases where the values of the Others are in

    complete opposition to one’s values ? Seriously ? Can you not imagine cases in wich a black african will
    get to know intimately the culture of some Europeans and conclude that they don’t like that culture ?
    Why is it so difficult for you to understand that not everyone is going to like you and that it’s
    normal and acceptable ?

    3) It’s sad because, some people (Koreans and Foreigners alike) will generalize, in their ignorance, that

    all black people are easily angered and violent.
    —-
    It doesn’t need to be ALL black people or even a majority. You just need a minority that’s noxious enough
    to taint the reputation of the whole group. I’m not violent but I know damn well that blacks
    tend to punch way above their weight when it comes to violent criminality.
    Unfortunately for you and for me that is well known pretty much all around the world.
    The difference between me and you is that I’m ashamed of it and I don’t blame non blacks
    for being weary of the presence of large black populations. It’s rational, plain and simple.
    When black behaviour stops fitting the well known patters, perceptions will change.
    Observed Behaviour shapes perceptions, much more than the reverse.
    —-
    I must say when people tell me to “calm down” when I’m passionately expressing a point, does set me off.


    Maybe you should adjust. I’m sure that a lot of Hong Kong chinese who live in north-america or europe
    learn that they should adjust in order not to sound rude to people. The often sound very very rude ! Maybe it’s

    normal to them but it’s not normal to us in north-america so if they’re, say, on the job and they care about the

    image they project, they adjust.

    To my mind it’s a loaded statement. To me it’s a generalization that blacks need to calm down because they are

    so violent and easily angered.

    —-
    Where does the stereotype come from ? Of course you don’t ask yourself such questions but many people do
    —-
    It sounds like mindless noise, frustrations rise and the situation becomes explosive. I hope no one was

    seriously injured as a result of this, that the subject in question feels remorse for his actions and corrects

    his ways and that blacks are not systematically ill-treated in a knee-jerk reaction because of the actions of

    one man.
    —–

    That black guy was just thuggin it out, probably like he does at home.
    Kick him out of Korea. When i travel abroad I don’t like seeing blacks like him around.

    and last :
    Please, Koreans, don’t let weasels like iNeville guilt trip you into accepting multiculturalism
    in your country. You guys have a real culture and a real identity, unlike us canadians ( I’m canadian too, hehe)
    who seem to have nothing else to show to the world than “there’s lots of different cultures in Canada”. Lame.
    Be vigilant ! Promoters of the multicult are sneaky and you guys are probably not used to that language at all.
    Keep Korea Korean ! That’s what makes it interesting after all. Don’t let Seoul become another Toronto ( lame,

    boring, utterly soulless).

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  • YangachiBastardo

    I’m a black male myself and am extremely disappointed to see that even in Korea there are
    people in the group that I belong to who are acting exactly like they do in the USA,Canada,Europe

    In all fairness in Europe the situation seems a bit more relaxed, the real issues are with islamic communities and, to a lower degree, with the South Americans and the Roma. Black folks, both citizens and African immigrants, seem well adjusted or at least no more angry and miserable than the average Euro.

    I wholeheartedly agree with the idea of keeping Korea Korean, i really don’t see why every place needs to be “cosmopolitan”, which often means a rundown, ultra expensive, soulless maelstrom

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  • phajej

    This is an example of why Americans are the most hated people in the world!!! We go to foreign countries and show no respect to their ways, then get offended when someone tries to be helpful to us. We think we can push our weight around anywhere and get away with it. We take our rights, freedoms, and beliefs with us to foreign countries and practice it openly.

    This video just goes to show how much respect he has for Koreans/Asians himself, because he apparently knows a little Korean himself. If you are a English Teacher in South Korea, you would think the first thing you learn is how to tell students simple commands like: Sit down, be quiet, no running… He must’ve not been a very great teacher anyways.

    The escalation between African-Americans and Korean-Americans were escalated during the L.A. riots. Most Mom and Pop stores that were looted were owned by Korean-Americans and the depiction of Korean-Americans in movies is an added blow to them too. Even through all this they keep their cool and go about their own business.

    This man embarrasses me as an American. You would think that as an college graduate he would have the general knowledge to appreciate and accept foreign cultures.

  • jessman

    This Guy is a shame..he is here working in a foreign country and do not embrace the custom..Is this really an English Teacher in korea? which korean parents are proud of them that there sons and daughter are their students.. can you imagine teaching a foul language to your sons and daughter..teaching simple ABCD.. my name is john doe..wow wow said the dog..how how said the Carabao..

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