≡ Menu

Interesting use of pixelization

Not that I feel terribly bad for a bunch of Somali pirates, who should probably count themselves lucky they were hung from the radar mast of the ROKS Choi Young, but just out of curiosity, why are the faces of the cops in this photo pixelated but the faces of the accused aren’t?

As expected, the trial is running into linguistic difficulties:

The first session included identification of the defendants, which took 14 minutes longer than the usual two because of three-way interpretation from Korean to English to Somali and back again. Legal analysts say the language barrier could be a stumbling block for both prosecutors and the Somalis’ four-member defense team.

None of this would have been a problem if they’d just hung ‘em at sea. As Fulbright scholar Dolph Lundgren said in “The Expendables,” “It’s good to hang pirates.”

Oh, and props to this guy:

“I came here to see what pirates look like and talk about them with my friends later,” said Jeong Yun-jin, a 75-year-old Busan citizen, who was in the courtroom. “It [piracy] is not something we are supposed to do as human beings. They should make a living from their labor.”

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • holterbarbour

    Perhaps it’s because They All Look Alike™.

  • gbnhj

    Or, rather, the face of one of the accused was pixelated, while those of the other two pictured weren’t. Now, what’s up with that?

  • http://www.bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    It would be explained by the police requesting pixelation because they are afraid of retribution against the police officers by other Somalis, and the one Somali guy whose face is pixelated is a cooperating witness rather than an accused in this trial.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Those would be some very good reasons.

  • http://gypsyscholarship.blogspot.com/ jefferyhodges

    “I came here to see what pirates look like and talk about them with my friends later,” said Jeong Yun-jin, a 75-year-old Busan citizen, who was in the courtroom. “It [piracy] is not something we are supposed to do as human beings. They should make a living from their labor.”

    Most people just don’t appreciate how much labor goes into criminality!

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

  • SomeguyinKorea

    I think the defense attorney is right on the dot by bringing into question whether South Korea has the jurisdiction to put these people on trial or not.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    SomeguyinKorea

    Every nation has the right to apprehend, prosecute, and punish piracy under “international law”. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piracy#Law_of_nations

    So-called civilized nations these days tend to give pirates and terrorists caught in the act far too much attention. A rope or a bullet is a far better method of discouraging piracy than either paying them off or making them celebrities and global martyrs…

  • CactusMcHarris

    Robert,

    They were hung or they weren’t from the mast? I didn’t remember any street justice being rendered on-the-spot by the ROKN….

    #7,

    And given Somalia is a failed state (but they do have very interesting succulent plants!), I’d say the law’s on Korea’s side.

  • http://www.bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    I think the defense attorney is right on the dot by bringing into question whether South Korea has the jurisdiction to put these people on trial or not.

    Nope. I mean, if that’s all you’ve got then of course — play the cards you can play. But Korea’s Criminal Code clearly extends Korean jurisdiction to crimes of piracy committed both on Korean vessels and against Korean nationals at sea. And the pirates were, I believe, apprehended in international waters. Extradition applies to the removal of an accused from one state to another — these guys had already removed themselves, from a state which, as Cactus McHarris notes, has no recognized central government to petition for extradition. So they weren’t “extradited” in the first place, and even if they were, there is no one to ask for the extradition.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #7,

    You’re argument is a link to an article which is little more than an attempt at justifying American law (and its interpretation of international law)? Sorry, but that’s not the best way to convince a non-American.

    #9,
    “But Korea’s Criminal Code clearly extends Korean jurisdiction to crimes of piracy committed both on Korean vessels and against Korean nationals at sea.”
    How is this seen by international law?

    “So they weren’t “extradited” in the first place, and even if they were, there is no one to ask for the extradition.”

    Excellent point.

    A bit of an aside, but what are your thoughts on South Korea’s extra-territorial application of its laws for victimless crimes? I’m sure you’ve heard of how Koreans are being arrested by the local government for victimless crimes, such as gambling (in Vegas) or smoking pot (in Amsterdam) despite the fact that these acts are very much legal where they occurred.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com setnaffa

    Yeah. Wikipedia is a part of the vast right wing conspiracy. Sure. That’s the ticket…

    SomeguyinKorea then neatly tries to change the subject to victimless crimes, because we all know the pirates are just victims of Samsung or LG… And the violent death of the Korean ship captain is just an expression of their frustration with Korean drug laws, not an attempt to profit by robbery and murder…

  • cmm

    @11 violent death of the Korean ship captain?

    Anyway, the pirate who’s face was blurred out was a minor. That’s why the hid him.

  • http://www.bcarr.com Brendon Carr

    A bit of an aside, but what are your thoughts on South Korea’s extra-territorial application of its laws for victimless crimes?

    I’m agin’ it. But not as much as I oppose the United States’ extraterritorial application of its income tax law.

  • cmm

    they**

  • http://vmphotography.com.au hoju_saram

    None of this would have been a problem if they’d just hung ‘em at sea…

    You mean hanged ‘em, surely? Or was it diction?

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #11,

    Nah, far from it. Didn’t notice how I praised Mr. Carr’s point? I just feel that arguing a matter of international law by placing the US as an authority is simply distasteful and arrogant on your part.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #13,

    Yeah, I agree that you’re getting screwed with that one.