So… it turns out that Osama Bin Laden was executed while he was unarmed:

Osama bin Laden was unarmed when Navy commandos shot him, the White House said Tuesday in a revised version of how the world’s most notorious terrorist was killed.
[...]
Although others at the compound were involved in a firefight with the U.S. commandos, bin Laden “was not armed,” Carney said Tuesday, adding that it doesn’t mean he didn’t resist in some way.

Additionally, the unarmed wife, who rushed the assailants as they moved toward her husband, was shot in the leg but not killed, Carney said. Another woman on a lower floor of the compound was killed when she got caught in the crossfire between the SEALs and the men living at the compound with bin Laden.

This apparently bothers some people (see, too, the analysis in the Guardian here). Personally, I find the thought of Osama being double-tapped in the head by a Navy SEAL much more appealing than him going out in a blaze of glory, and both alternatives infinitely more appealing than the circus of a trial. Still, I suppose opinions differ.

Also, there’s apparently a war of words going on between the United States and our valiant (and well-paid) allies in the War on Terror, Pakistan, with CIA director Leon Panetta making some very frank comments about why Pakistan was kept in the dark about the operation. I read an interview this morning with former Pakistan president Pervez Musharraf that nearly made me spew coffee on my monitor:

Musharraf: “I do agree that (the news about bin Laden in Pakistan) is surprising and a lot of people in Pakistan are not believing that. This is unfortunate. It needs to be investigated. Who slipped up? Why this negligence?”

Logan: “You are really asking people to believe that this all happened without the knowledge of the intelligence services and the military and that it came as a complete surprise?”

Musharraf: “Yes, yes, I am saying that and I mean every word of it.”

Logan: “It’s just very hard to believe that Osama bin Laden could have spent all this time in Pakistan, living right under your noses and nobody would have known about it?”

Musharraf: “Why you continuously saying that? I think instead of wasting time on this issue, let us agree to disagree on this point. I don’t agree.”

The Pakistani foreign minister reportedly finds some of the comments coming from Migukistan “disquieting.” What I find disquieting is this observation by Chris Hitchens:

If you tell me that you are staying in a rather nice walled compound in Abbottabad, I can tell you in return that you are the honored guest of a military establishment that annually consumes several billion dollars of American aid. It’s the sheer blatancy of it that catches the breath.

Things are about to get very, very interesting with Pakistan.