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‘Korean Tea Classics’

For fans of Korean tea culture:

Three ancient texts expressing the essence of the Korean Way of Tea are here translated into English for the first time. The oldest, ChaBu Rhapsody to Tea, by Hanjae Yi Mok (1471-1498), is a sophisticated and delicate celebration of tea. The author was a scholar of considerable attainments who died far too early. The 19th century saw a tea revival among Korean literati. Its main guide was the Venerable Cho‐ui (1786-1866). The first of his tea texts, ChaSinJeon Chronicle of the Spirit of Tea, he copied from a Ming Chinese work to serve as a practical guide to tea. The great poem, DongChaSong Hymn in Praise of Korean Tea, for which Cho‐ui is chiefly celebrated, is a set of formal poetic stanzas celebrating tea with notes by the author to elucidate the references.

This volume offers an English translation of these three remarkable works, with explanatory notes and biographies of the two great masters of Korean tea. It gives readers who are unfamiliar with Classical Chinese access to the essential texts of the Korean Way of Tea.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

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  • http://www.san-shin.org sanshinseon

    This is an excellent achievement and advancement that provides access to crucial knowledge about Han-guk Chado that has remained hidden from all of the tea-interested outside world, and even most Koreans themselves. I will buy this one soon, and ask Brother Anthony to sign it — he deserves all the allocades and awards he has recently received.

  • beatnix

    I know that many Korean cultural traditions and arts were suppressed, banned, and eventually lost to history during the Japan’s Colonial rule of the Korean peninsula.
    I wonder if the tradition of Chado suffered the similar fate?

  • cm

    Posts like this will only aggravate Chinese claims of Koreans trying to steal Chinese culture.

  • http://www.san-shin.org sanshinseon

    > beatnix
    > I know that many Korean cultural traditions and arts
    > were suppressed, banned, and eventually lost to history
    > during the Japan’s Colonial rule of the Korean peninsula.

    Well no, i don’t think much of that really happened. Nationalist sorrta stuff was supressed, sure, but only the most politically-inspiring was banned — and not much was “lost” — Koreans revived much, either out of the J’s sight or after Liberation. Read up on the “Cultural Nationalism” surge of the 1920s.

    > I wonder if the tradition of Chado suffered the similar fate?

    I’m not aware that anybody tried to revive it in that era, other than those who quietly carried on the royal, aristocratic and monastic variations. Han-guk Chado was mainly revived after Liberation by Master Hyodang-seunim, and Ms Myeongwon also deserves strong mention…

  • Robin Hedge

    Very nice post. Look forward some calm moments to read this book.