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Police Investigating Allegations of Abuse of Jang Ja-yeon

Against the wishes of Jang Ja-yeon’s family, her former manager Yoo (full name not released) has gone public with allegations that Jang was beaten and coerced into sex with a producer-director. Yoo claims that Jang left behind notes with details of the abuse that she wanted made public after her death. He has been admitted to hospital after a failed suicide attempt. The Bundang police have assembled a team of investigators, who have taken computers and other evidence from Jang’s home and other locations.

  • kimchi2000

    I’m not too surprised. The Korean entertainment industry is so dirty and corrupted. I wonder just how many female stars were forced (or more than willing) to have sex with producers and directors to have 5 minutes of screen time.

  • wjk, 검은 머리 외국인

    let’s ask an important question.

    Do Americans do this in the American industry as well? Acting, modeling, singing, etc.

    Can you honestly say they don’t?

    I doubt rape, coercion.

    But, “consensual to get ahead”, I think is probably there.

    this investigation is a good thing, nonetheless.

  • http://yeomso.blogspot.com/ The Goat

    wjk,

    Stay on topic.

    You’re welcome.

  • wjk, 검은 머리 외국인

    one thing to note is that, I’ve never heard of “Ms. Something” on a nudie magazine saying, “I want to show my tits and vaJJ to perverts all over the world.”

    No, no, no. It’s always something like,

    “I want to model, I want to act, etc.”

    I wonder what % of actually got to do THAT.

  • wjk, 검은 머리 외국인

    this IS on topic, Canadian idiot. I’m expanding it to the US market.

  • http://yeomso.blogspot.com/ The Goat

    wjk,

    The topic at hand is the investigation of this sad incident and subsequently the potentially seedy side of the Korean entertainment industry. Your question was not important nor was it relevant.

    Nobody suggested that it is a problem specific to the Korean entertainment industry yet you felt compelled to bring up the tired “well it happens somewhere else too” load of horseshit.

    If you cannot see the absurdity and inherent contradiction in

    this IS on topic, Canadian idiot. I’m expanding it to the US market.

    then I am truly in awe of your seemingly infinite asshattery.

    On the other hand, perhaps any knowledgeable folks out there can enlighten us on the state of the entertainment industry in other completely irrelevant to the story countries.

    By the way, my being Canadian has no bearing on whether or not I am an idiot.

    You’re welcome.

  • JW

    Potentially? You mean you didn’t already know this kind of stuff was going on in Korea among women wanting to be celebrities? Yeah, it’s pretty bad.

  • http://yeomso.blogspot.com/ The Goat

    Understated. I think this happens pretty much everywhere (and not just limited to the entertainment industry).

    But that…is a different topic. Or perhaps I could expand this one to include it…dunno.

  • R. Elgin

    The producer/director is a slimebag and should be put in jail, if not have his legs broken with axe handles. Considering the effect upon Ms. Jang, I simply do not understand her family’s unwillingness to see justice done — this more than just a petty matter of kibun.

  • Pohang

    Lest we miss an important point:

    This investigation is taking place “against the wishes of Jang Ja-yeon’s family.”

    Now…why is that? Wouldn’t you want to have justice if anyone had a hand in pushing your family member over the edge like this? Well, you might, unless you yourself had a large part to play. Maybe she broached these problems with her family, but was hushed?

    If so, the most salient reason for all of this might be that her family values its ‘reputation’ more than it valued her. It would be a little less hard to understand a suicide in light of that sort of callous selfishness. What do you do when you have nowhere to turn?

    Of course I could be totally off base here. But if it were my family member, I certainly wouldn’t be opposing any investigation of abuse.

  • mashimaro

    Which part of her family? Her parents are already dead. There’s only a sister and maybe uncles and aunts. I think the police have a duty to investigate any wrong doing here. Famous or not famous, you need to have an investigation.

  • Pohang

    Elgin beat me to it. :)

  • Benicio74

    WJK, you are correct that many wannabe starlets sleep their way to the top (or even 15 minutes of fame) everywhere — it’s well known as the “casting couch”. However, you are an idiot for implying that 1) because it happens everywhere, that lessens the seriousness of this case and 2) immediately implying that we all think this only happens in Korea- we don’t.

    Yes, it is common for wannabe stars to spread their legs for better opportunities. However, their have been numerous stories in Korea that this is industry standard — if a female wants to make it, she’s gotta give it up to the entertainment industry bosses. How do you think Baek Ji Young ended up on video tape with her manager?

    I knew a guy with connections to the entertainment industry here and he told me many stories about the bigwigs demanding sex from up & coming stars.

    The other major factor is the use of physical abuse, from school teachers all the way to Olympic athletes, there are serious problems with those in power using physical abuse as a means to control their “subjects”.

    In this story, it is being said that Jang was being abused and forced into sex by those who had power over her and that is why she ended her life. That is very shameful!

    Her family wishing to keep it a secret in order to “save face” is just cowardly and stupid. If someone f***ed with my family like that, I would want to burn them in every way possible.

    We can think about one possibility that would make someone not want to reveal a damaging secret — hush money!

  • colontos

    I doubt rape, coercion.

    But, “consensual to get ahead”, I think is probably there.

    I’d agree with this, probably.

    The Goat: you are being an idiot. To see an example of someone saying something similar in a slightly less idiotic way, see Benicio’s response. Benny still has a way to go, though.

  • http://yeomso.blogspot.com/ The Goat

    colontos,

    Yeah…you are probably right. wjk was correct in “expanding” the topic based on his own insecurities.

    Expand away people…expand away.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    Well, based on what my wife’s friend told us (she had a supporting role in a TV drama), it’s not that they sleep with producers in order to get ahead, but rather that they won’t get ahead if they don’t. The moment she started appearing on TV, he manager received late night phone calls from TV producers. She quit after the production on her show had ended because her manager kept pressuring her to accept and she wouldn’t.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    …Not saying that’s the only way to make it in the Korean industry…there’s also nepotism.

  • SomeguyinKorea

    #2,

    You’d be surprised. Even the American porn industry if far more conservative/professional than you’d think.

    It’s no secret that the casting couch was one of the seedier sides of Hollywood in the past. I even remember seeing Tony Curtis say, “We all did it back then”, when asked about whether there was any truth in rumors that Nancy Reagan had been a favorite of Hollywood producers (wink, wink, nudge, nudge).

  • wjk, 검은 머리 외국인

    i never said it was less important because it happened elsewhere. That is YOUR own prejudice.

    you interestingly bring up a tradition of beatings, expected sex, etc. On that, I think Japan can be legitly blamed. A lot of the school beatings, military beatings, expectant sex, etc probably are eerily similar to the Japanese colonial era in education, etc. I maintain the position that the boys took their bullets and the girls took their dicks. We sort of have a right to hate them. And who was South Korea’s architect in modernization? A Japanese army lieutenant !

    the Japan thing is admittedly a derailment. Happy?

    this gyop never got to see baekjiyong’s video. I think for Baek’s case, she was actually in love with her manager. He’s not high enough to demand sex and be powerful enough to pull strings. The guy was simply a douche. I can think of at least one other prominent Korean female entertainer who fell in love with her manager, had sex with him, and the dude tried to use the sex encounter to his own advantage. Common, and consensual in that context.

    with gamdoknim or sajangnim, with no hair and pot belly, it’s a different manner. No woman in her right mind would be getting wet over that.

    I’ll give you this to think about. Paris Hilton has a sex tape. She becomes a proud star due to it. Baek has one. She is ALMOST buried for it. Haven’t seen either, and don’t care to. Paris is way dumber than Baek, by the way. Her stupidness kind of bothers me, and I think Britney Spears probably has a higher IQ than her.

  • wjk, 검은 머리 외국인

    oh yeah, Hwanj soojung was not only buried, but only served jail time, deemed as not marryable, after she was

    caught to have been having sex with some rich guy and doing illegal drugs. Which I presume to be no more serious drugs than what American teenagers use everyday.

    what a way to ruin a woman’s life. Amazingly, she came back to tv, but apparently, no one likes her anymore. Not a great place for females in the industry, Korea.

  • WeikuBoy

    “Not a great place for females, Korea.”

    Fixed that for you, wjk.

  • Won Joon Choe

    #16:

    “Well, based on what my wife’s friend told us (she had a supporting role in a TV drama), it’s not that they sleep with producers in order to get ahead, but rather that they won’t get ahead if they don’t.”

    This locates the nerve of the problem, except I would refine it further by saying that “they won’t get roles if they don’t.”

    Not only have I heard this from reliable sources, but even pre-eminent Korean actresses have said as much in public (e.g. most recently, Han Hye-Jin–of “Jumong” fame–has explicitly said she faced numerous pressures in this regard, and further implied she did not get the plum roles earlier in her career because she did not accede to those pressures).

    As for wjk’s deflection of the issue by declaring that the same thing happens in the U.S., of course this is a genuine debate stopper, because there is no precise, quantifiable way to prove this. But common sense tells me that:

    1. The pressure to whore among actresses is far more endemic in Korea than the U.S., because of the vastly greater degree of sexism in Korea;

    and

    2. The actresses’ refusal results in violence far more frequently in Korea, because of the greater social sanction for violence–esp. against women.

  • JW

    Korean society telling a woman, you must not do such a thing, because there will be severe consequences when it becomes public, directly translates to, men in power having to force it out of the same women when they feel like getting it.

    Well, they’re gonna have more women lawyers and prosecutors and judges. Is it ok to hope for a better future?

  • Mizar5

    Sleeping your way to the top is, I believe, a rather basic move in any country and probably more rampant in the entertainment industry than in other industries. Here, the stakes are much higher – fame and recognition – and these things don’t come free.

    HOWEVER, what is being discussed specifically is RAPE. That is certainly not acceptible, even within the sleep-around standards of the entertainment industry. If this is true, it should be prosecuted.

  • Acropolis7

    When all else fails blame Japan like pawi, sorry, I mean like wjk said…

  • http://koreanamerican431.blogspot.com/ baduk

    Does a bear shit in the woods?

    “Who do I have to sleep with to get somewhere?” is not only in Western society but in the East as well.

    Do not even think about going into entertainment industry. It is a den of thieves.

    Used, abused and thrown away to committ suicide.

    Another actress bites dust.

  • http://koreanamerican431.blogspot.com/ baduk

    Now his manager wants to blackmail some big shot.

    He’d better be careful.

    He could die. Or, go to prison.

    Big shots have goons on the payroll.

  • http://koreanamerican431.blogspot.com/ baduk

    Mizar5,

    Rape? Wake up and smell the coffee.

    These girls know too well which meeting involves “the seconds”. To the motel with no panties on, that is.

    You can claim rape when you went there with no panties on.

  • http://koreanamerican431.blogspot.com/ baduk

    Won Joon Choe,

    Your wife’s friend tells the truth.

    And, your observation about Korean men and violence against women is correct as well.

    The reason,however, comes from the fact that Korean society is not Christianity-based. In Asian society, violence against women are not only condoned but welcomed as manliness.

    Alcoholism, frivolous suicide (as Jang is guilty of) and violence are major Korean problems.

  • Acropolis7

    “In Asian society, violence against women are not only condoned but welcomed as manliness”–

    To compensate for what? In Middle Eastern societies it seems to be the same, so it is not just an Asian thing.

  • Won Joon Choe

    #30 says:

    “To compensate for what? In Middle Eastern societies it seems to be the same, so it is not just an Asian thing.”

    I don’t think there is a “compensation issue” here, given that Middle Eastern men are supposedly just as well-endowed as Caucasians. The simpler explanation is that the more traditional the society, the more it tends to be patriarchal.

    And Baduk, sir, I am un-married, as much as I wish it were otherwise.

  • Acropolis7

    Well women in Africa are also beaten by their husbands and endowment on that continent is not even worth discussing so to speak. My point is that it doesnt matter which culture, men hit women, period. I think its a human illness not racial.

  • JW

    In Asian society, violence against women are not only condoned but welcomed as manliness.

    I’m not so sure about this. Not that korean men aren’t frequently violent towards their wives — they obviously seem to be — but I think generally these same men do believe that it is cowardly for the stronger to strike the weaker. I think maybe the only major difference between east and west is that there’s not enough successful legal backlash.

  • Won Joon Choe

    #32,

    Of course, all cultures have their share of wife-beaters; but that’s not the point. The point is rather that the phenomenon is far more widespread in some cultures.

    #33,

    Yes, the relative weakness of legal restraints explain part of the problem; but I think culture is a better explanation. Besides, how do legal practice emerge?

  • JW

    Hey Won Joon, this is pretty interesting. Does stronger belief against hitting women tend to give rise to legal mechanisms against hitting women? Is it possible that opposite might be true? That is, the stronger the belief, the less it is felt that legal mechanisms will be necessary?

    Two other major factors, I would guess, is the relative difficulty in getting a divorce in Korea, and the relative lack of career options for women in korea. Of course whatever makes the women more dependent on the men will matter, I think.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    WJK, that paragon of moral reasoning, syas:

    let’s ask an important question.

    Do Americans do this in the American industry as well? Acting, modeling, singing, etc.

    Let’s ask an even more important question.

    The tribesmen in Irian Jaya who are generally credited with having killed and eaten Michael Rockefeller and his companions on an anthropological mission practice pederasty. Boys are taken away from the women’s lodge when they are quite young and then are systematically initiated into men’s society by being systematically used sexually by all the warriors until being assigned to one for special attention until their training is complete.

    Based on WJK’s perspective, I guess this would thus be OK in Korea too, right? Or only if the practice is carried on in some more powerful society?

    I don’t know any other place besides Korea where the whingeing “But Johhny did it, too” is rolled out with such frequency and with such confidence that it’s an ethical winner.

  • Pohang

    Yeah, I’ve mulled this one over quite a few times myself. It’s complicated.

    Culture is the determining factor, I think, when you consider the traditional taboo regarding divorce. In the past when a woman married, well that was it. Come what may, you were stuck, and that lack of leeway, that absence of choice, basically gave a free hand to abusive men, leading to tacit acceptance of wife beating.

    But, that’s changing quickly. The divorce rate in Korea now is comparable with the West, if not more prevalent, though it was almost non-existent 15 years ago. Modern Korean women are less likely to put up with the nonsense of a backward, conservative husband.

    However, until the process of empowerment for women is more complete, in the workplace and in society in general, abuse will continue to be a big problem. Lack of a strong voice makes it unlikely that strong laws will be passed or enforced any time soon.

    I personally know lots of Korean guys who would never hit a woman. They are disgusted by it, and know it is wrong, yet they see it as part of Korean social reality. This is a case where Korean women need to stick up for themselves and make their voices heard.

    Demand more laws, better enforcement, and harsher punishments for offenders. Just as importantly, Korea needs to do a lot more to create support systems and institutions geared towards assisting battered women. No point in getting out if you have nowhere to go.

  • JW

    I don’t know any other place besides Korea where the whingeing “But Johhny did it, too” is rolled out with such frequency and with such confidence that it’s an ethical winner.

    I know of no other expat site as this one where Koreans are disparaged so frequently out of a pathetic desire to categorize Korea as a uniquely diseased society. And since this is the most popular Korean expat site, that should tell you something.

  • http://www.korealawblog.com Brendon Carr (Korea Law Blog)

    Yes, the relative weakness of legal restraints explain part of the problem; but I think culture is a better explanation. Besides, how do legal practice emerge?

    If the legal restraints do not match the culture, ultimately they will be a hollow joke.

    For example, in Korea it’s supposedly “illegal” to give or take bribes, yet bribery is basically socially mandatory. Prostitution is “illegal” but comprises 6% of GDP. Dog meat is against the law, too, but we all know where to go to get it. These things are ingrained in society — why is there an effort to make them unlawful?

    In the United States, it’s “illegal” to smoke pot. There is even a “war on drugs”. Yet we can see that the war is a losing effort, because the culture in the US is one that favors getting high on various drugs.

  • wjk, 검은 머리 외국인

    Sperwer, you shouldn’t have married a Korean, then, you pathetic fool.

  • wjk, 검은 머리 외국인

    i never said he did it, so it’s okay.

    you said that.

    YOU !

    some Canadian idiot, and another American nemesis of mine.

    wow, is the trend now to accuse me of saying things I never said, because YOUR brain said it?

    YOUR brain sucks.

  • wjk, 검은 머리 외국인

    WeikuBoy
    Posted March 15, 2009 at 8:18 pm | Permalink
    “Not a great place for females, Korea.”

    Fixed that for you, wjk.

    I disagree. I don’t have tits and a VaJJ, but I think Korean women in Korea got a pretty good deal in South Korea.

    1/ no military service.
    2/ I think 1/2 and 1/2 status has been reached in the most lucrative higher education spots, referring to MD, JD, MBA programs.
    3/ it’s pretty much accepted now that South Korean males do not have balls anymore to live with his parents, when he is married. That’s because no Korean woman will put up with it. This is a gross violation of Korean family tradition.
    4/ Jaesa culture is dying. I don’t support it anyway, because it’s pagan religion, but the backbone of the Jaesa culture was the woman working her back and butt off the kitchen. This is disappearing rapidly.

    if Korean women are able to READ English, let it be known that very frequently people like WeikuBoy come to Korea, looking for ‘obedient women’, and ‘tight Xussies’. And they claim they are ‘liberating’ Korean women by taking them OUT of Korea.

    Sounds pretty damn chauvinistic to me.

    1/ freeing Korean women from Korean men
    2/

  • Won Joon Choe

    JW at #35,

    I think Brendon at #39 answered your question directed at me.

    I would emphasize one thing, here, however. I think the larger problem is a culture of socially-sanctioned violence in general rather than socially-sanctioned violence against women in particular.

    To be blunt, beating the crap out of people is not a big deal in Korea, as much as it is in the West. You can see this from things as different as the fact that corporal punishment is encouraged in the primary schools to the fact that violent political (esp. student) protests are condoned, as long as the Molotov-throwing lunatics don’t kill any policemen or by-standers.

    Personally, I got an emphatic, indelible lesson on this cardinal cultural difference as a fresh-off-the-boat immigrant 6th grader in West Hartford, Connecticut. I pummeled a fat kid who had relentlessly made racist cracks at me–without a second thought–and I was the one held culpable by the class teacher and the principal! I was absolutely stupefied. Back home, insulting someone gave you a carte blanche power to do whatever you wanted with the perpetrator. In fact, a few months before in Kangnam, prior to emigration, I had re-arranged the face of someone who made light of the fact that my father had passed away during my childhood, and the teacher told the unfortunate fellow that she could not do anything for him because she “started it.”

    At any rate, what explains this difference? Crudely, but not inaccurately, I think much explanatory power lies in the fact that Korea is a “shame” culture (as pre-modern West had been) that emphasizes the sanctity of one’s “face,” whereas the West is more corporealist and emphasizes bodily integrity more and dismiss non-tangible goods like “face” or honor. Moreover, I can trace that momentous transformation in the West back to Hobbes and the emergence of liberal corporealism, but then I’d get bogged down into another tendentious argument about whether thinkers actually influence society–as well as deal with snipes that I am engaging in meaningless name-dropping.

  • wjk, 검은 머리 외국인

    we need more white men riding white horses to rescue our Korean women and de-sexify our entertainment industries. By doing that, you will also eliminate sexism in all of Korea. Please start at the hagwon level. Date the math teacher. If she’s girl, bang her. Please come to Korea and take all of our pretty women. Just give us your ugly women or leave us the ugly Korean women.

  • wjk, 검은 머리 외국인

    the only ‘fag’ you discriminate against is the mythical ‘Korean fag’.

    How interesting, indeed.

  • http://www.sperwerslog.com Sperwer

    I would emphasize one thing, here, however. I think the larger problem is a culture of socially-sanctioned violence in general rather than socially-sanctioned violence against women in particular.

    To be blunt, beating the crap out of people is not a big deal in Korea, as much as it is in the West.

    I dunno; there are several overly aggressive drivers (2 taxi; one civilian) here whom I’ve bitch-slapped into unconsciousness in the past six months (in each case after letting them each have a free shot), whose subsequent recourse, and mewling and incredulous complaint, to the police of having been hit “in their own country” suggests otherwise.

    I think the difference in the States is that name-calling alone is not enough to justify a physical response. Here causing someone to lose face by simply calling them on their own prior misconduct apparently is a physically actionable offense, except that, in true bully fashion, the shamed person isn’t likely to have the requisite physical courage unless they are facing someone demonstrably weaker than himself (as women are categorically deemed to be) or someone over whom they believe they have some other advantage (i.e., the foreigner) that they can exploit in a dishonorable way.

    Imagine the shock on their faces when they discover my brother-in-law is a colonel in the National Police (although I’m running through my balance of chits rather quickly).

  • Sonagi

    I pummeled a fat kid who had relentlessly made racist cracks at me–without a second thought–and I was the one held culpable by the class teacher and the principal!

    Both of you should have received consequences. At my school, a racial remark earns the offender a half-day excursion to ISS (In School Suspension). Not surprisingly, racial insults are a rare occurrence.

  • Won Joon Choe

    Sperwer at #46,

    As you imply yourself, in your case there was the xenophobia angle in your case to cancel out the violence-is-no-big-deal angle.

    Sonagi at #47,

    I’d assume racial insults may is actionable in the West Hartford school systems, too, now. Don’t forget that I was a 6th grader in the proverbial “when tigers used to smoke” times. Politically correctness had yet seep into then a small, mono-cultural (actually, bi-cultural, as in WASPS and Jews) New England town.

  • http://yeomso.blogspot.com/ The Goat

    Lose your meds wjk?

  • misuda

    @ Sperwer #46
    Did I hear you right in that you ‘bitch slapped three people (drivers) to an unconscious state in the last 6 months?” or was that an exaggeration?
    Can we know more?
    Perhaps we all need to credit you with singlehandedly improving driving culture in this country.

  • Sonagi

    Politically correctness had yet seep into then a small, mono-cultural (actually, bi-cultural, as in WASPS and Jews) New England town.

    Imposing consequences of hurling racial slurs is not PC. Insults or inappropriate language of any kind usually results in some consequence, depending on the severity and frequency.

  • misuda

    Sonagi, is it inappropriate to call your teacher a cunt?

  • colontos

    Imposing consequences of hurling racial slurs is not PC.

    You mean in school, or in general?

    In school, ok.

    In general, no, this is the very definition of PC.

    It’s good that you became a teacher; it suits you. That’s not a compliment.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    Sonagi, is it inappropriate to call your teacher a cunt?

    Don’t know, misuda, but your avatar is. Please change it.

  • http://www.korealawblog.com Brendon Carr (Korea Law Blog)

    I dunno; there are several overly aggressive drivers (2 taxi; one civilian) here whom I’ve bitch-slapped into unconsciousness in the past six months (in each case after letting them each have a free shot), whose subsequent recourse, and mewling and incredulous complaint, to the police of having been hit “in their own country” suggests otherwise.

    Still experiencing increased testosterone levels from the workout regime, eh?

  • misuda

    What? My (me?) avatar is a cunt? What’s not to like, the Hitler moustache? The faux hilts glasses?
    I don’t like to argue with the blogmaster but could you please state your reason for requesting me to change my (very inoffensive) avatar.
    Did Mizar5 complain?

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    I think you know the reason. So please change it — it’s easier than me simply banning you.

    Thanks for your cooperation.

  • misuda

    Ok boss. I’ll look for something more appropriate.

  • misuda

    How’s this?
    Nobody can recognize me, right?

  • misuda

    Damn, I still look like Nora.

  • globalvillageidiot

    #60 – “Damn, I still look like Nora.”

    That’s who I thought it was!

  • WeikuBoy

    WJK, in re your post on March 16 at 9:43am: When I first read it, I assumed you were serious. I now am convinced you are putting me/us on. Korea, which perenially ranks below the entire rest of the First World and barely above the Arab Islamic countries in its treatment of women, is actually a paradise, because Korean women need not serve in the military and no longer have to sleep in the next room from their mothers-in-law. Funny stuff, dude!

    Brandon Carr: Your irony quotes might be appropriate for Korea, where bribes and prostitution are “illegal” – yet (reputedly) ubiquitous. I assure you, however, there is a very real war on drugs being waged in the U.S., where many, many lives have been ruined by the criminal justice system, even over very minor pot charges. If you think the war on drugs is a joke (in addition to being cruel, hypocritical, a failure, and a waste of resources), then what more would you do that isn’t already being done?

  • Darth Babaganoosh

    is it inappropriate to call your teacher a cunt?

    That all depends. Is she?

  • http://sungnyemun.org/wordpress/ dda

    WJK [...] When I first read it, I assumed you were serious.

    Silly wabbit.

  • Arghaeri

    “I think 1/2 and 1/2 status has been reached in the most lucrative higher education spots, referring to MD, JD, MBA programs.”

    Doesn’t mean a lot when they still have to make the tea, book the restaurants, and flights etc…

  • JW

    Hey Won Joon, thanks for your story. I agree that intellectual tradition can matter, but the key question I think is, can its influence wane in the absence of things like legal and marriage restraints, and if so, how fast? My guess would be yes of course it will wane, and will wane relatively quickly, considering how tempting it is for the physically stronger to take advantage of the weaker regardless of the fact that such actions are generally accepted to be cowardly.

  • http://www.jdlink.co.kr Linkd

    Has swlee broken in again? I’m not sure. misuda also reminds me of NES. We’ll see how things develop, but a banning can’t be too far in the future.

  • http://www.jdlink.co.kr Linkd

    Imagine the shock on their faces when they discover my brother-in-law is a colonel in the National Police

    I found it funnier to imagine the shock on their faces when they realized you really were going to kick the shit out of them.

  • funkoffan

    Just copying this from a blog:

    Korea is classified a “danger country” in terms of women’s public safety by the 30-member OECD. According to the OECD’s Social and Welfare Statistics for 2007, the homicide rate for Korean women is 1.7 per every 100,000 people, the third highest after the U.S. (2.7) and Iceland (2.2).

    #38 – I agree and it’s worrying. This may seem strange after posting what’s above – however, I think that a lot of the negative comments from any reader here is based on frustration with their lives in this country. Whether it be wjk, who is obviously bitter about his life in Korea or a foreigner who sites “language barriers” as an issue. People need to be happy with what they have and stop b*tching about what others have.

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