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Changgyeonggung Palace

One of the nicest places to stroll around in Seoul is the Changgyeonggung Palace, one of Korea’s five major palaces.

Rear Garden, Changgyeonggung Palace

The Changgyeonggung has a rather odd history. It was originally built in 1484 as a retirement home for a former king. The place was torched during the Imjin War of 1593, and rebuilt in 1616. In 1907, when Emperor Sunjong moved from the Deoksugung to the Changdeokdung, the Changgyeonggung was turned into a park, complete with a zoo and botanical garden. This “parkification” was completed by the Japanese in 1910, when they renamed the place from the Changgyeonggung (“Changgyeong Palace”) to the Changgyeongwon (“Changgyeong Garden”) and opened it to the general public.

In 1983, the zoo was removed and the compound restored to “palace” status. But it still feels like a park, and the botanical garden is still there.

Okcheon-gyo Bridge

When you enter the the palace, there is a beautiful stone bridge that crosses a small stream. If you look at the side of the bridge, there is a goblin face carved into the side. This goblin was carved to ward off evil spirits. The carvings on the railings, meanwhile, are meant to prevent fire.

Okcheon-gyo Bridge

Okcheon-gyo Bridge

Okcheon-gyo Bridge

Okcheon-gyo Bridge

Main Courtyard, Myeongjeongjeon Hall

Like Korea’s other palaces, there is a broad courtyard just in front of the main throne hall. In the case of the Changgyeonggung, the peaks of Mt. Bukhansan are visible in the background.

Main Courtyard, Changgyeonggung Palace

The Myeongjeongjeon, or main throne hall, is smaller than the throne halls of the Gyeongbokgung or Changdeokgung, but it’s beautifully designed with some particularly intricate corridors to its left and right. The carvings on the stone steps are also worth looking at.

Myeongjeongjeon Hall

Stone Steps, Myeongjeongjeon Hall

Inside, Myeongjeongjeon Hall

Rear, Myeongjeongjeon Hall

Rear, Myeongjeongjeon Hall

Rear Garden

One of the things I like about the Changgyeonggung is the contrast between the palace and the skyline. This is truly where the modern and the traditional meet:

Rear Garden, Changgyeonggung Palace

Chundangji Pond

The area where the Chundangji Pond is was originally a royal farm plot, but in 1909, a Japanese-style pond was dug, complete with a Japanese-style pavilion and boats. You can see a photo of it from the 1950s here. In 1986, it was redone in Korean style — see below:

Chundangji Pond

Nice sky yesterday:

Chundangji Pond

Chundangji Pond

Chinese 7-Story Pagoda

If this pagoda doesn’t look Korea, there’s a reason.

Chinese Pagoda

The pagoda, which shows definite Lamanist influence, was built in 1470 in China. In 1911, the Japanese purchased the pagoda from an antique dealer and placed it on the side of the Chundangji Pond. Basically, it’s a really nice garden ornament.

Botanical Garden

OK, I admit it… this is what I really came to photograph.

Now, people often say to me, “You know, Marmot, all those photographs of old Japanese public buildings, American missionary schools and French Catholic churches are all well and good, but you know what I’d like to see? One of those Victorian-style glasshouses, like at Kew Gardens or London’s old Crystal Palace from the Great Exposition of 1851. You know, some serious steampunk stuff.”

Well, children, here you are:

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

The glasshouse of the Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden was built in 1907 as Korea’s first such wood, iron and glass glasshouse. The building was designed by Hayato Fukuba, who was in charge of the Shinjuku Imperial Garden in Tokyo, and constructed by a French company. The glasshouse housed (and still houses) rare flora, including tropical plants.

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

The glasshouse was a symbol of the Victorian Age, the Industrial Revolution and the technological, economic and cultural might of the British Empire. The father of the glasshouse was Joseph Paxton, the 19th century gardener and architect whose masterpiece was the Crystal Palace of the Great Exhibition of 1851. The Victorian glasshouse was in some ways the Art Deco of its day — a cutting-edge, futuristic design that symbolized a bright future that, arguably, never came.

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

An interesting feature here is the influence of Moorish design on Victorian architecture. This influence is clearly visible in the Changgyeonggung Glasshouse, especially the windows. Paxton also found inspiration for his glasshouse design in the organic structure of the waterlily.

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Here are some shots of the interior:

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Changgyeonggung Botanical Garden

Trams and Trains

The North Gate of the Changgyeonggung Palace leads out into the National Science Museum. On display there, for those who are interested, are an old Seoul tram and an old steam locomotive.

Seoul’s tram system was founded by American businessmen, Henry Collbran and Harry Bostwick, in 1899. Tram service continued in the until November 1968, when tram service when increasingly viewed as a relic of the early industrial past. For an excellent look at the history of Seoul’s tram system, see this piece by Dr. Andrei Lankov.

These trams were built in Japan.

Seoul Tram

Seoul Tram

Work on Korea’s first railroad, which linked Seoul’s Noryangjin with Jemulpo (now Incheon), was begun by American J.R. Morris in 1897. Work stopped, however, due to lack of funds. A Japanese then bought the railroad rights, the on Sept. 18, the line was opened.

This Mogul-type steam engine, imported from Japan in 1934, ran from Suwon to Incheon and Suwon to Yeoju, playing a major part in the development of those regions.

Steam Locomotive

Don’t forget the Flickr slideshow.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • http://www.tomcoyner.com TomCoyner

    For a photo essay of Changgyeonggung, but in winter, please go to http://www.tomcoyner.com/Winter_Light_Palace.htm

  • http://www.law4u.net/winnie ●~*

    The proper names here make me think of VAT tax, which is redundant with tax in VAT(value added tax) tax.

    Changgyeonggung Palace
    gung(궁, 宮)=palace
    Okcheon-gyo Bridge
    gyo(교, 橋)= bridge
    Myeongjeongjeon Hall
    jeon(전, 殿)= hall
    Chundangji Pond
    ji(지, 池)= pond

    No, I don’t assert that I be correct. It’s awkward to call Changgyeonggung Palace as Changgyeong Palace for Changgyeonggung is one unit.

  • globalvillageidiot

    Great photos. This palace seems to be overlooked by a lot of people in favor of the more central – and seemingly more famous – palaces. I used to work nearby, and it was usually possible to head over for an hour or so during a break and not be bothered by crowds.

    1. Tom, your winter shots are very nice, and bring back some memories. I brought my father, sister, and some friends who came over for my wedding to Changgyeonggung during a December snowstorm. All were impressed. It looked even better with a dusting of snow, and the outing provided an excellent excuse to head over to Insadong and warm up with some makoli and snacks.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert Koehler

    ●~* — I agree it’s redundant. Unfortunately, that’s the way Seoul City wants it done, and I don’t want to use one system for work and another for here.

  • kafka2k

    I would really like to check this place out. Can you tell me where it is located? I followed the link to the cultural heritage site, and found no such info there.

  • globalvillageidiot

    “I would really like to check this place out. Can you tell me where it is located? I followed the link to the cultural heritage site, and found no such info there.”

    If you are traveling W to E from Anguk Station along Yulgokno, keep on going past the gate of Changdeokgung (and entrance to Biwon) for another 500 m or so. You will be able to see a wall along the left hand side as you go. When you reach the intersection (Yulgokno and Changgyeonggungno) turn left and walk another couple of hundred m. The gate will be on your left. Can’t miss it.

  • Ut videam

    #5 -

    Seoul City Tour Bus also stops right in front of the gate.

  • http://21cseonbi.blogspot.com sewing

    Utterly fantastic stuff. Wow, I have so got to check out that glasshouse—seriously!

    For anyone who cares, there are working, somewhat scaled-down replicas of the Seoul streetcars running in the Fantastic Studio outdoor movie/TV set out in Bucheon—along with Cheonggyecheon as it used to be (not covered over, uncovered, and gussied up), the Hwashin Department Store, the Jongno Police Station (?), and various other buildings, storefronts, and whatnot from the 1910s or so through to the 1970s.

    There’s also a working excursion steam train down in South Jeolla somewhere, along an old alignment of the Jeolla-seon that has since been bypassed by the Korail mainline.

    There used to be a Sunday steam run along the Gyooe-seon north of Seoul, but it appears to have been discontinued a few years ago.

    Hmmm, sounds like the material for a Marmot’s Hole post of its own….

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