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My deepest condolences

UPDATE: It saddens me to post that it appears the news was true. I really don’t know what to say. Shawn was an inspiration to many of us Korea bloggers, and his tragic death comes as a great, great shock. Again, I send my heartfelt condolences to his friends and family. He will be dearly missed, even by those like me who knew him only as an incredibly talented writer and blogger.

ORIGINAL POST: I don’t know whether to believe this or not, but if it’s true, it’s a tragedy and my condolences go out to his friends and family.

About the author: Just the administrator of this humble blog.

  • http://hojuin.net/blog/ Hojuin

    I have no words – it’s not like I knew the man in any form more than his blog(s) but my god I feel like I’ve lost a friend.

    RIP mate, what a blood tragedy.

  • R. Elgin

    Depression does not fool around.
    I’m very sorry to hear of this.

  • http://eflgeek.com EFL Geek

    I’m sure it didn’t help that a number of expat sites in Korea where harrassing him online.

    Anyhow it is a tragedy and my condolences to his family and friends.

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert

    Now’s not the time to start playing the blame game, but yeah, I was disgusted by some of the stuff I read today.

  • Brendon Carr

    Shawn was pretty clearly bi-polar. It’s too bad this mental health problem is stigmatized to such an extent that it prevents expatriates from getting proper medical care. I’ve known a number of bi-polar individuals and from his writing it was very obvious. Anyway, it’s a life-long struggle for such people and the only good thing to say about Shawn’s suicide is it finally brought him release from a very heavy load.

    There are a lot of bi-polar individuals amongst the English teachers in Korea. We don’t want to lose you — please take care and stay on your meds!

  • http://nathanbauman.com/seoulhero/nfblog NathanB

    That was eloquently and disarmingly put, Brendon.

  • Luke

    I haven’t read much of Shawn’s China blog for a while now, but I’ve read his stuff off an on now for years. I still remember reading his early tales about coming to Korea for the first time. He really captured the expereince well, and his writing resonated with a ton of people.

    The Internet is a weird place… I’m now sitting in Canada feeling sad because some guy I’ve never met killed himself, but it does feel like I’ve had a relationship with this guy — even though he has no idea I even exist.

    Rest in Peace Shawn. I hope things are better now.

  • http://plungepontificates.blogspot.com Plunge

    What a shock, I had no idea. I wish I was able to read things as well as Brendon. This certainly puts your own problems into perspective.

    My prayers are certainly with his family and close friends.

  • Sonagi

    Your comments are interesting, Brendon. My brother, breadwinner with a a stay-at-home mom and four young children, was diagnosed as bi-polar last year after disappearing for 2-3 days at a time on numerous occasions over several months. On one of his trips, he parked his car on a bridge and thought repeatedly about driving over the edge. His wife, an amazingly strong woman who has held the family together, finally got the cops to take him to the hospital after he came back from his last ‘trip;’ He took three months of medical leave and worked with a specialist to find the proper medication and dosage. I’m happy to say he is much better, and he just found a great job to support his family, after his Fortune 500 company mysteriously started giving him bad performance evals citing “misspellings in emails” and “not smiling enough” and the company doctor asked him,”Have you ever thought of looking for another job?” Bi-polar is only treatable, not incurable, so I worry about him, and when I ask his wife, “How’s he doing?” she knows what I mean.

  • macdonaldduck

    For Shawn, a faultless friend:

    Evening into midnight–midnight and beyond.

    The truth came unannounced,

    a strange and uncouth visitor,

    unexpected,

    death came to our door.

    mere words, all this–

    a friend has gone,

    and tears–yes, tears–I’ve cried just now, as have you and she, and so many,

    tears of strange grief, for a friend never known nearly well enough,

    and so dear Shawn,

    whom we loved so much,

    no mere platitude, that, no cheap greeting card,

    for we loved you indeed,

    so many of us, each singly, some from afar–we love you, man–our hearts revolting against grammar. Present tense, past, future perfect: you’re with us.

    And we’re with you forever: count on it, friend!

    forever

    though the form does not exist–it cannot–to contain the content of our sorrow.

    May God receive you, and may you never again know any sorrow,

    but be at peace and in happiness forever.

    “Si me Dryhten freond”:
    MAY THE LORD BE MY FRIEND.
    –from The Dream of the Rood

  • http://lostnomad.blogs.com/ Nomad

    Yeah pretty unbelievable and shocking. For those that can read Chinese, someone left a link to a news article .

  • http://kushibo.blogspot.com kushibo

    Brendon Carr wrote:
    There are a lot of bi-polar individuals amongst the English teachers in Korea. We don’t want to lose you — please take care and stay on your meds!

    I think you may be right, but whether the number is higher, about the same, or even lower than with the same group “back home,” I think getting help is not just a matter of stigma, but also of access to someone here (in Korea; perhaps in China and Japan, too) who can properly diagnose you and then properly treat you.

    Even if an international resident might be able to cut through the stigma that Korean-Koreans often can’t, the question is: who can you go to who will know that it’s bipolar disorder that you’ve got? Among the things possibly in play, there’s a language barrier, a cultural barrier, plus a knowledge barrier (frankly, since psychiatric doctors have so few cases to work with — particularly non-native Korean-speaking patients — they might not always see the signs).

    I really didn’t read Shawn’s blog more than once or twice, so I don’t know if he sought treatment or not, but I know of people with serious problems who sought help and were eventually told, “Oh, this is just the stress of being in a new culture,” or “Give it time, and you’ll get over him/her.” Needless to say, it didn’t always help, and it certainly wasn’t what was needed.

  • Brendon Carr

    Every one of us knows someone who is struggling with bi-polar disease. It affects about 1% of the population. Sonagi is right: It’s treatable but never “curable”. Apparently the medications aren’t the same for each patient — which is why having a stable relationship with a health-care provider is important, to be able to “fine tune” the treatment regime. Unfortunately here in Korea (and, as Sonagi noted, in the United States too) there is a strong stigma associated with the disease which keeps expats, particularly English teachers, from seeking treatment; it also doesn’t help that they usually don’t know where to find English-speaking medical professionals with mental-health experience, and (correctly or incorrectly, it doesn’t matter) they don’t trust Korean physicians to respect their privacy.

    The medications often make the bi-polar individual “feel funny” and after an extended period without an episode a lot of these individuals decide to discontinue the medications and breathe free. They imagine themselves cured. Then they flip out again. Twenty percent of untreated bi-polar individuals kill themselves. That’s why it’s so important if a friend or acquaintance exihibits manic behaviors to steer that person toward mental health treatment.

  • http://www.occidentalism.org shakuhachi

    Shocking. Obviously what was written about Shawn was deliberately vague, but it seems like he was hung up on one woman, probably the one who was in every second post he wrote. Of course mental problems played a role in this, but if a man finds himself in this situation it is a good idea to meet other women and then see if you still feel the same way about the one you are fixated on.

    Anyway. Rest In Peace.

  • http://timurileng.blogspot.com Zhang Fei

    Nomad: For those that can read Chinese, someone left a link to a news article .

    The gist of the article is that – based on forensic evidence (fingerprints, etc – things I file under “too much information”) – the police think he jumped from the roof of his apartment building. The reporter interviewed a convenience store proprietress who said that she was friendly with him and had invited him over for dinner with her family that evening. She said he mentioned that he had taken some leave from teaching because of some bad news from home about his mother. After taking a stateside phone call, he indicated to her that it was more bad news about his mother. That was the last time she saw him alive.

    I have no idea if any of this is true, but that’s what the article says. RIP.

  • railwaycharm

    Sad story. I hope this chap has found his peace.

  • Remort

    I had never met Shawn in person, I had known him only through exchanging emails and reading his blogs over the last several years. He was a very talented and gifted writer, one that made you really feel as if you were there sharing his experiences with him through his writings.

    I’m really torn up over his sudden departure from this earth. I can only hope that he now has the peace he so much deserves.

    Good bye my friend, thank you for the laughs and for your friendship.

    –Remort

  • Brendon Carr

    I don’t want to be too specific here, but there is a non-ethnic Korean doctor in Seoul who does not respect the privacy of his Western patients.

    Hmm. Now, who could that be?

  • michael

    Very sad.

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  • http://eflgeek.com EFL Geek
    I don’t want to be too specific here, but there is a non-ethnic Korean doctor in Seoul who does not respect the privacy of his Western patients.

    Hmm. Now, who could that be?

    Actually I would really like to know. Maybe this is common knowledge, but I certainly don’t know.

  • MrChips

    I’m relatively new to the blogging world but I spent the greater part of yesterday reading through the archives of korealife blog. It makes me wonder again if there is any connection between a troubled mind and gifted pen. Simple eloquence like what I read could have only come through a jagged filter. I saw he has published much of his blog material. Does anyone know if and where that might be available still? That part of this young man’s contribution to the world should live on.

    Lay down your burden friend, and God speed…

    C.S. Lewis “The pain now lies in the joy then.”

  • Sonagi

    I’m not going to name names. That would be unfair to the doctor since my allegations are hearsay. Just ask around the expat community, but not on this blog.

  • Sambek_ZX

    Why is this diagnosis of bi-polar disorder being accepted so unquestioningly? Do people here really know what this guy went through? If not, I find it to be demeaning speculation.

  • Remort

    MrChips:

    I believe you can buy both of his books in PDF (downloadable) and print form (bound book) still at lulu.com, I have provided the links for both of his books below. I don’t want to speak for Jake, but I assume he’d be willing to email out copies of Shawn’s China Life Blog (e-book) for the asking.

    Island of Fantasy – A memoir of an English Teacher in Korea

    Korea Life Blog – Special Edition

    Also, over on Jake’s site in the comments sections of “Shawn’s Final Story”, the posters of some nasty comments about Shawn on Dave’s ESL Site in the past have been recanted very recently.

  • Brendon Carr

    Sambek_ZX is partly correct. I am not a mental-health professional and not formally qualified to make mental-health diagnoses. At best I am an armchair psychiatrist. But I have known so many bi-polar individuals personally and professionally (they have a higher-than-average incidence of legal problems) that the signs stood out quite prominently in his writings — the highs and lows coming cyclically. Especially the abrupt move to China, abandonment of his blog, and the intense focus he had on the girl, seem to me to fit the pattern as well.

    Anyway, I don’t think it’s demeaning to Shawn at all. Bi-polar helps explain why someone with an obviously sweet spirit, great talent (he was an engaging and productive writer), and enthusiasm for life would suddenly end it all. I have to believe that there was something really wrong, something beyond human control, to prompt the dire step of suicide — because otherwise a guy who commits suicide is just a prick (as Kevin Kim has written on his blog). Shawn Matthews was not a prick.

  • Sambek_ZX

    Mr. Carr, there is no doubt in the tone of your posts that you meant it to be respectful speculation, but it was speculation nonetheless (as you acknowledge) that IMHO might have disserviced Shawn had he lived. And the reason originated in your own need to remember him as a “non-prick” (“I have to believe that there was something really wrong…”), or to understand the events according to your own moral compass.

    Some people would rather be labeled a wilful prick and be respected than a victim of circumstance and be pitied. The bi-polar theory makes perfect sense, but I’m not so sure Shawn would have appreciated everyone’s sympathy.

    What if, being in full control of his faculties, he had a strong belief in the afterlife, and wanted to really meet the father whom he had missed so much, albeit at the cost of everything else. This line of speculation sounds plausible to me, and doesn’t require me to take pity on him. I don’t agree with the theology or the morality of the decision, but at least I would have respected him for going after what he believed. That is what I meant by “demeaning,” in relative terms. At the very least, I say, let the guy have all the fries in his Happy Meal in his death.

  • Brendon Carr

    Respect the decision? Respect for going after what he believed? Yikes. The bi-polar individuals I have known and worked with (like I said, they have a higher-than-average incidence of legal entanglements) also believed in conspiracies against them, and some believed in devils plaguing them. I cannot respect someone’s acts taken on such beliefs.

  • http://kushibo.blogspot.com kushibo

    Sambek_ZX wrote:
    Mr. Carr, there is no doubt in the tone of your posts that you meant it to be respectful speculation, but it was speculation nonetheless (as you acknowledge) that IMHO might have disserviced Shawn had he lived.

    In fairness to Brendon Carr, he does seem to have some foundation for thinking so, and even if his speculation about Shawn is wrong, Brendon is offering up something that is useful to others who might be in as dire straits.

    And the reason originated in your own need to remember him as a “non-prick” (”I have to believe that there was something really wrong…”), or to understand the events according to your own moral compass.

    Or to understand it in the world around him/us, which we are still in. Again, Brendon is offering up something very helpful to others in the wake of this tragedy.

    Some people would rather be labeled a wilful prick and be respected than a victim of circumstance and be pitied. The bi-polar theory makes perfect sense, but I’m not so sure Shawn would have appreciated everyone’s sympathy.

    Well, at the risk of sounding extremely insensitive, Shawn doesn’t own the aftermath of this. Whether he is a prick or he is, as I believe, a too-often tormented soul who took his life, we are left here to interpret his actions and make sense of it all, and perhaps see to it that others don’t do the same.

    What if, being in full control of his faculties, he had a strong belief in the afterlife, and wanted to really meet the father whom he had missed so much, albeit at the cost of everything else. This line of speculation sounds plausible to me, and doesn’t require me to take pity on him.

    It sounds a bit like you are the one trying to interpret this to make yourself feel better about it, according to your own moral compass.

    I don’t agree with the theology or the morality of the decision, but at least I would have respected him for going after what he believed. That is what I meant by “demeaning,” in relative terms. At the very least, I say, let the guy have all the fries in his Happy Meal in his death.

    Nonsense. Of the people I know who seriously attempted suicide, none of them really wanted that as their final solution, even if at the time they thought they had no choice.

    This reminds me of what I think is a seriously twisted take on suicide that is not uncommon in Korea, where those who succeed are considered “brave” for going through with it (when in fact they are often cowardly for not being able to face the problems before them, especially the problems they faced, and they leave behind others who are in a much worse state because of the loss).

    Shawn’s death is a tragedy. If he had received proper help for what was tormenting him, would he still have killed himself? I’m guessing the answer may be no. Maybe others can learn from this, and see the signs in themselves and others, and therefore seek help or help others seek help. To suggest that we have no business doing this, that his suicide was all good, is quite wrong-headed, to say the least.

    I admit I know very little about Shawn, but I’m reasonably familiar with the problems being laid out here, so I think my two cents is worth at least that.

  • Haisan

    > This reminds me of what I think is a seriously twisted take on suicide
    > that is not uncommon in Korea, where those who succeed are considered
    > “brave” for going through with it

    I have encountered this more than once. Very depressing and scary thought. When a friend of a friend killed himself a few years back (giving of screaming warning signs in the process… just like in those AFN spots… that everyone missed), my friends talked about how “selfless” it was “giving oneself to the great nothingness.”

  • Sambek_ZX

    Quotes:

    “Respect the decision?…”

    “It sounds a bit like you are the one trying to interpret this to make yourself feel better about it, according to your own moral compass….”

    You guys are missing my point (which was most likely due to my sucky rhetorical skills). I wasn’t offering up the afterlife bit as the way I was envisioning his intent. I certainly wasn’t intending to champion some Korean self-sacrificial ideal. I have no theory. My mind is truly blank on this guy and I keep it that way because I frankly never knew him. I was offering it up as a plausible alternative to the “mental” theory. So my point was, seeing as no one really knows went on with this guy, why speculate (while prefacing them with words like “clearly” or “of course mental problems played a role”) in a way that brings the guy down a notch or two, or even speculate at all?

    Not only was the speculation going full steam ahead, but people were accepting it as near-fact. Which makes Kushibo’s comment all the more enlightening/damning. We pick apart this guy’s mental health and life history to make judgments for the purpose of consoling ourselves. The self-centeredness of it all just doesn’t seem appropriate in this context.

    But I said enough. I shall get off my soapbox out of respect for this blog and you long-timers.

  • http://kushibo.blogspot.com kushibo

    I wrote:
    when in fact they are often cowardly for not being able to face the problems before them,especially the problems they faced, and they leave behind others who are in a much worse state because of the loss

    Should have been: especially the problems they caused.

    Sambek,

    I didn’t miss your point; I rejected it.

    And yeah, I know you weren’t championing the “self-sacrificial ideal” of suicide (which was Haisan’s description, not mine; I was describing it as cowardliness romanticized as bravery, though Haisan’s take on it easily interweaves with mine). But your description of a respectful reason for the suicide certainly echoed a similar sentiment.

    You suggest that talking about him as possibly having an untreated (?) mental illness is “bringing the guy down a notch or two,” and I would submit that that is exactly what part of the problem is: the stigma of seeking help when you need it. In my mind, there is no going down a notch or two in either needing or seeking help. If anything, when I see such things, it is the opposite.

    And again, this is not about consoling myself. For me, this is about seeing this as an opportunity to help people who may be in similar dire straits.

  • http://yankabroad.blogspot.com yankabroad

    I didn’t know Sean Matthews at all, apart from a few brief email exchanges.

    He struck me as a man who was busy. Busy contributing to the great pile of thought, information and emotion that is life.

    He wrote books, and created blogs. He inspired people.

    He had strengths, he had weaknesses. Like us all, he was human.

    Was Sean a postiive player? Yes.

    Did he have a dark side?

    Yes.

    As Neil Young said: “It’s better to burn out, than to fade away.”

  • http://www.occidentalism.org shakuhachi

    I’m not going to name names. That would be unfair to the doctor since my allegations are hearsay. Just ask around the expat community, but not on this blog.

    Is calling this hearsay mean that you did not overhear the remarks yourself? If that is so, then you really should not have made the claim. I myself had someone claim that they *know* me on another blog, and write defamatory and untrue claims about me. Considering the small foreign community, there are people that are bound to know who you are talking about. It is not enough to make throw away remarks about people that will affect their personal and professional lives unless you are willing to put your money where your mouth is. Given that you said that you will not “name names” it seems to me that you are aware of the libelous nature of your claims, and are trying to back out without retracting them.

    No, I am not the person in question. After my experience I am very sensitive about the issue.

  • macdonaldduck

    Quoting Brendon Carr:

    “Respect the decision? Respect for going after what he believed? Yikes. The bi-polar individuals I have known and worked with (like I said, they have a higher-than-average incidence of legal entanglements) . . .”

    Case closed right there.

    End of story.

    Only idiots and buffoons and semiliterates use “like” as a conjunction (“like I said”).

    Brendon Carr is quite clearly a preposterous bozo who obtained a degree or two more than what his native intelligence should have allowed.

    Now he makes the big bucks here in Korea (of all places),

    while looking down his long, pompous nose at those of us English teachers who make the not-so-big bucks here in Korea (of all places).

    You’ve got the George W. Bush Syndrome written all over you, Brendon Carr! Just like the Chimapanzee-in-Chief, you are overentitled, pseudo-overeducated, too self-proud by a mile, and just plain out of touch generally.

    No need, really, even to touch on Carr’s obesely out-of-range moral deficiency. Those of us with more-or-less functioning minds and hearts have mourned Shawn’s death. We’ve taken it hard, or in some cases not so hard–to various degrees, depending upon various factors. Carr, meanwhile–nothing if not the perfect lawyer, nothing if not a would-be ambulance chaser back home if he weren’t too incompetent to work anywhere but in Korea (see how we teachers can play the same game. bozo?)–looks for an angle to exploit. (“Take your meds, all you clod-hopping, beer-swilling, paycheck-to-paycheck English teachers”–a rough quote from another of his vomitous effusions above.)

    Sorry, folks, but there’s a time for peace, and there’s a time for war. Carr is not civil, not decent, not intelligent, not caring, and so deserves and in fact requires to be shot down. Or this issue, anyway.

    macdonaldduck

  • http://kushibo.blogspot.com kushibo

    macdonaldduck,

    You are letting your biases (about lawyers, among others) affect your judgement here. I think your caricatured condemnation of Carr is way off base.

    I only know Mr. Carr through on-line forums, but I have had actual voice-to-voice interactions with him over the legal matters (of others whom I was trying to help out).

    Mr. Carr is sounding the bell of preventing unmanageable problems before they become unmanagable problems, whether they be related to English teaching, drugs in Korea, or now mental health issues.

    I am not a lawyer, but Mr. Carr’s sentiments here jive almost perfectly with my own, so I am inclined to assume his admonitions, exhortations, and forewarnings on such issues come from a desire to see people not get in trouble, rather than an innate predisposition to chase emergency medical vehicles.

    Mr. Carr spoke of what he believes to have been Shawn’s untreated or improperly treated bi-polar disorder because he would prefer not to see others suffer the same or fate or something nearly as bad.

    Maybe you don’t see that as proper mourning of Shawn, but Mr. Carr is trying to take this tragedy and maybe help others, and that hardly makes him deserving of what you just laid down.

  • railwaycharm

    macdonaldduck, Misplaced venom.

  • http://www.san-shin.org sanshinseon

    macdonaldduck,

    that was the most ridiculous and mis-directed flame
    i’ve seen on this blog for quite a while…

    cool down, dude — take your meds, whatever they be :-)

  • Brendon Carr

    I’m excited to hear about all the money I’m making, though.

  • http://kushibo.blogspot.com kushibo

    that was the most ridiculous and mis-directed flame
    i’ve seen on this blog for quite a while…

    And that’s saying a lot!

  • railwaycharm

    Maybe it’s the money that got panties in a twist?

  • Sambek_ZX

    Yeah, holy crap. What the hell was that diatribe about?

  • dogbertt

    Let me get this straight.

    Someone (or two) supposedly knows of an unethical physician. These people (unbidden) coyly mention such a danger is out there, but when pressed for details, claim it’s just “hearsay” and encourage us to go a-rumormongering among other expats.

    Either you know something or you don’t. If you have facts and want to do more than coyly claim to be in the know, spill them. If it’s just supposition and you aren’t actually willing to assist those of us who aren’t perhaps as “connected” as you are, then it would be better not to dangle such gossip at all.

  • railwaycharm

    Blog tease, Blue blogs

  • gbnhj

    Macwhat?

    I took no insult by what Brendon Carr wrote, and continue to regard his comments as welcome. To my mind, he is knowledgeable, experienced and opinionated – a perfect combination for blogging.

    Sounds like someone is self-medicating already, and should possibly consider down-dosing.

  • mook

    Didn’t know Shawn or even know about his blog, but condolences to his family and friends. Always sad to hear this kind of thing.

  • macdonaldduck

    Can it possibly be that I’m the only one here who’s been following Carr online for about three or so years?

    His blog, while it ran, was amusing and informative. I read every post–”whoop-dee-damn-doo!” The one about a missionary, or evangelist (or whatever), caught by the police in one of Itaewon’s back alleys with an illicit drug, and having then to turn to Carr’s office for help, sticks in my mind above all others.

    And by the way, yes, Carr went out of his way to inform readers of the blog that “you CANNOT afford my services,” words very much to that effect, anyway, though I’m not exactly quoting. Yeah, hotshot. You are so very, very, drippingly hot. Who could possibly afford you? Whoop-dee-damn-doo indeed!

    Throughout almost all that he writes, Carr exudes a haughty superiority. It’s just so plain-as-day clear that he views himself as inhabiting a world above: superior in every way to us mere English teachers; superior to Koreans in general–and yes, I can back this bit up with a quote about “the usual Korean bullshit,” going back a few years; superior to the unwashed and untutored masses who don’t hold law degrees.

    Did I overreact against the man’s arrogance in my rant (quite possibly misplaced) upwards in this thread?

    Quite possibly, if not very likely.

    Take that back: He insulted English teachers in Korea generally, if only by insinuation, in what he wrote above. And THAT, I firmly believe, is ENTIRELY bogus.

    I won’t even begin to list my own credentials here. I’m not going to give you my IQ, my SAT and GRE scores, my GPAs, or anything else of the kind. I won’t tell you the names of some of my former students here in Korea (you’d likely recognize some of them from the news and probably wouldn’t believe me)–no, not of all us here teach kindergarten. And even if we do, aren’t we performing a job that needs doing?

    Join the human race, Carr, please. You ARE human, as it happens. You are NOT so very different that you can pronounce judgment on Koreans, trash English teachers generally, diagnose mental illness without the appropriate credentials, and/or generally carry on as though you were somehow not . . . one of us.

    Self-medicating while evangelizing? Yeah, just like that wine-swilling Jesus. Sobriety is overrated. Drink, read, look at things as they are. Tell it like it is (heh, heh, “like” as a conjunction, whaddya know?). In vino veritas and VODKA TO THE END OF THE LINE!

    macdonaldduck

  • macdonaldduck

    Quote:

    “There are a lot of bi-polar individuals amongst the English teachers in Korea. We don’t want to lose you — please take care and stay on your meds!”

    See what I mean?

    Carr doesn’t want to lose us. He NEEDS us low-lifes to verify his position higher up.

    Any English teacher in Korea who isn’t hugely insulted by this assault on all of us:

    I don’t know what to say to you.

    macdonaldduck

  • railwaycharm

    macdonaldduck,
    Why do you let it get to you? Are you feeling like you have small pecker syndrome?

  • Brendon Carr

    And by the way, yes, Carr went out of his way to inform readers of the blog that “you CANNOT afford my services…”

    I’ll leave it to other readers’ discretion whether macdonaldduck is off his rocker or has a small pecker. But by point of clarification, yes, I have told — and continue to tell — English teachers that they cannot afford my services. Businesses can, because they budget for the expenditure. But which individuals, other than athletes, rock stars, or movie stars, or multimillionaire executives have a budget for legal services? I know I surely don’t.

    A small encounter with the penal system will set the English teacher back W10,000,000 at minimum, and possibly double that. We’ve got a criminal defendant in our offices now whose repeated appeals of his pot-possession bust have set him back W35,000,000. To my understanding, that’s up to a year’s savings for any hardworking teacher. When I say “you CANNOT afford” it, that advice is offered as a caution to avoid an easily-avoided legal entanglement — that advice was offered in the context of “Just say no to drugs” while overseas. Gee whiz, just pass the dutchie on down the line. Or give me all your money. Frankly that advice goes against my financial interests.

  • Haisan

    Even after 15 years online, I’m still surprised by the ability of the Internet to destroy basic reading comprehension (ie, Macdonaldduck). Don’t know why, but I still am.

    I just wish Carr did not need to defend himself from every brainless troll that comes posting by…

  • http://rjkoehler.com Robert

    I just wish Carr did not need to defend himself from every brainless troll that comes posting by…

    And I just wish a post about a tragic death of a fellow blogger didn’t have to become a comment thread on whether or not Mr. Carr disrespects English teachers.

  • Brendon Carr

    Maybe I should stay away from topics concerning English teachers. There seems to be some sensitivity concerning that topic. Anyway, hopefully people will take from it the message that it’s far better to make sure your possibly-crazy friend gets treatment than to box up his belongings to ship home with his corpse.

  • judge judy

    it’s not the english teachers per se, it’s the trolls-maybe one and the same at times. surely the duckster is in need of a friend and perhaps some counselling. either way, give a fool a chance to speak and he’ll always validate his foolishness.

  • Remort

    Look people, Shawn was a great guy. I don’t understand why some idiots needs to continuously denigrate Shawn’s memory by trolling the folks here that want to discuss the inspiration he provided to others through his writings, the circumstances surrounding his death, and his friends that loved him.

    Grow up please.

    –Remort

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